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The following seems perfectly logical to me, but isn't valid c++. A union cannot be implicitly cast to one of it's member types. Anyone know a good reason why not?

union u {
  int i;
  char c;
}
function f(int i) {
}
int main() {
  u v;
  v.i = 6;
  f(v);
}

And can anyone suggest a clean alternative (the cleanest I can come up with is f(v.i);, which I admit is very clean, but the above just seems even cleaner)

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1  
Doesn't seem cleaner to me. –  Crazy Eddie Feb 20 '11 at 21:33
3  
It's as you said. You call f(v.i) –  CashCow Feb 20 '11 at 21:39
    
using the union instead of it's members means I can substitute it for any of them without bothering about which one it is actually using. –  baruch Feb 20 '11 at 21:39
1  
And thereby destroying any ability of the compiler to help you with types. I don't think that's a good idea at all. –  Omnifarious Feb 21 '11 at 1:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

While agreeing with Crazy Eddie that it doesn't look that better to me you can actually get an implicit conversion by defining it:

union u {
    int i;
    char c;
    operator int () const { return i; }
    operator char () const { return c; }
};
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I feel inclined to downvote, implicit conversions are a source of more problems than advantages and at the same time it only solves part of the problem, as it will allow f(v) if the argument of f is either an int or a const int& but will fail with int&. Also, if the function stores the reference (case of const int&) that will not refer to v.i, but rather to the temporary --will die at the end of the full expression, will not get updated as u.i gets modified... which might lead to unexpected behaviours –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 20 '11 at 23:12
    
I agree that is a bad idea and I'd never use this stuff but it's what the original poster was asking for (an implicit cast from union to a member) and may be that in his/her use case is a meaningful thing to do. Note that all the problems you list are also present when passing an int to a function expecting a double or a const double&. –  6502 Feb 20 '11 at 23:49
    
Yes, I agree. You've solved the OPs problem, and do not deserve to be downvoted. However, it's highly questionable as to whether or not the OP should be doing that in the first place. –  Omnifarious Feb 21 '11 at 7:54

How would the compiler know which member to use? It would need to keep track of which member was last assigned so it knows what to convert to. This is called a tagged union, and while it's certainly possible for the language to specify such a thing, that's not the case (it's a hold-over from C).

But that's okay, because we have boost::variant. Not only is it safer and more flexible than a union, it's more powerful. You can apply visitors to the variant, and it'll call (visit) the specified function with whichever member is currently active, with no further work from the user.

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No, it wouldn't. It is perfectly legal to assign to one member and read a different one. –  baruch Feb 20 '11 at 22:24
3  
@baruch: You're exactly wrong. In fact, the very first sentence describing unions is: "In a union, at most one of the data members can be active at any time, that is, the value of at most one of the data members can be stored in a union at any time." It's undefined behavior to write to one member than read from another. –  GManNickG Feb 20 '11 at 22:35

The reason why this isn't available implicitly (by default) is that it can be ambiguous. It's completely legal to have more than one member with the same type, and there would be no reason to prefer one or the other.

union u
{
    char c;
    TCHAR t;
    wchar_t w;
    int i;
};
void f(TCHAR);

u v;
f(v); // which member should be used?
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If there was one or more member of the same type, it wouldn't matter which one the compiler used, since they all occupy exactly the same space. –  dreamlax Feb 20 '11 at 22:15
1  
@dreamlax: A valid point, in all practical implementations. Unfortunately according to the standard it does matter. –  Ben Voigt Feb 20 '11 at 22:22

There is no different syntax I am familiar with. To be honest, accessing the union member directly is rather clear and concise as is.

I assume the reason there is no implicit casting is because of some rule whereby it's technically "undefined behavior" to write to one member of a union, then read from another member.

The implicitly casted type may not be the last one written to. While it's perfectly compilable code and it would probably work fine, the compiler, in principle, should not automatically or implicitly do something that is against the very rules it enforces.

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Anyone know a good reason why not?

function f(char c) {
    doStuff(c);
}

Best reason I can think of.

And can anyone suggest a clean alternative?

I'm with Crazy Eddie on this one; f(v.i) is as "clean" as it gets without inviting programmer errors. Two extra characters is an acceptable price to pay for more robust code, no?

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