Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So ive got an array of size 22, that reads in a number from the console and adds the number to the array. so if 123456 is read in the array will print out

12345600000000... something along those lines.

I need to right justify this number to perform arithmetic operations, but i cant seem to get the loop structure right to output the number!

int[] newlong = new int[22];
String inputline = "";

public void readNewLong()
{
    Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
    inputline = in.nextLine();

    try
    {
         for (int i = 0; i < inputline.length(); i ++)
         {
              char a = inputline.charAt(i);
              String b = "" + a;
              newlong[i] = Integer.parseInt(b);
         }

    }
    catch (NumberFormatException nfe)
    {
        System.out.println("NumberFormatException, you must enter a string of digits. " + nfe.getMessage());
    }
}

This is what reads in the number, inputline and store it in the array newLong.

The method below is what is not working...

public void rightJustify()
{
     printLong();
     System.out.println(inputline.length());

     for(int i = 0; i< inputline.length(); i++)
     {
         for(int j = 0; j < newlong.length; j++)
         {
              newlong[j] = (newlong[j] - (inputline.length() -i));
         }  
     }
     printLong();      
}                     
share|improve this question
    
Would this happen to be homework? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Feb 20 '11 at 22:21
add comment

5 Answers

Why you want justify to right actually you can enter in correct order?

If newlong[] is global then has 0 in all positions

for (int i = inputline.length()-1; i>=0; i--)
{
    char a = inputline.charAt(i);
    String b = "" + a;
    newlong[22 - inputline.length() + i] = Integer.parseInt(b);
}

edited: If you prefer your justify method I recommend you:

public void rightJustify() {
    System.out.println(inputline.length());

    for (int i = inputline.length()-1; i>=0; i--) {
        newlong[22 - inputline.length() + i] = newlong[i];
        newlong[i] = 0;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just want to do it with the loop structure to get a better understanding of array manipulation, but i seem to have gone wrong with my algorithm and i cant figure out why! –  Steven Feb 20 '11 at 21:56
    
@Steven I've modified your rightJustify see my edit –  smas Feb 20 '11 at 22:13
add comment

Why you don't align to the right when you read your data ?

Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
    String inputline = in.nextLine();

    StringBuilder inputData = new StringBuilder();
    try {
        for (int i = 0; i < inputline.length(); i++) {
            char a = inputline.charAt(i);
            inputData.append(a);
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < inputData.length(); i++) {
            newlong[newlong.length - inputData.length() + i] = Integer
                    .parseInt("" + inputData.charAt(i));
        }

        printLong(newlong);
    } catch (NumberFormatException nfe) {
        System.out
                .println("NumberFormatException, you must enter a string of digits. "
                        + nfe.getMessage());
    }

This an output

    123456
    0000000000000000123456
share|improve this answer
add comment

This is a strange way to parse an integer. Be that as it may, you don't need a nested loop to right justify the array:

// len is the number of digits of input.
public void rightJustify(int[] digits, int len)
{
    int off = digits.length() - len;
    for (int i = len; i-- > 0; ) digits[i + off] = digits[j];
    for (int i = off; i-- > 0; ) digits[i] = 0;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Following would work with minor modifications even with other number systems:

    int nrs[] = new int[20];
    char chrs[] = new java.util.Scanner(System.in).nextLine().toCharArray();

    for (int i = 0; i < chrs.length && i < nrs.length; i++)
        nrs[i] = Character.digit(chrs[i], 10);
    for (int i = 0; i < nrs.length; i++)
        System.out.print(nrs[i]);
share|improve this answer
add comment

Ok it's obviously homework which is why we're using for loops, but in practice I'd just use:

// len is the number of digits of input.
public void rightJustify(int[] digits, int len) {
    System.arraycopy(digits, 0, digits, len, digits.length() - len);
    System.fill(digits, 0, len, 0);
}

No reason to reinvent the wheel, even if the function is trivial enough for it imho.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.