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I want to know if at least one element in a first list can be found in a second list.

I can see two ways to do it. Let's say our lists are:

List<string> list1 = new[] { "A", "C", "F", "H", "I" };
List<string> list2 = new[] { "B", "D", "F", "G", "I" };

The first approach uses a loop:

bool isFound = false;
foreach (item1 in list1)
{
    if (list2.Contains(item1))
    {
        isFound = true;
        break;
    }
}

The second one uses Linq directly:

bool isFound = list1.Intersect(list2).Any();

The first one is long to write and not very straightforward/easy-to-read. The second one is short and clear, but performances will be low, especially on large lists.

What may be an elegant way to do it?

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2  
I think the second one will be faster for large lists. Since the first one is O(list1.Count*list2.Count) whereas the second is O(list1.Count+list2.Count). Second one takes more memory though. –  CodesInChaos Feb 20 '11 at 22:56
1  
If you really want to use LINQ to search exactly like your first sample, use bool isFound = list1.Any(list2.Contains); –  Ani Feb 20 '11 at 23:02
    
But of course that variant, just like the original code has quadratic performance. –  CodesInChaos Feb 20 '11 at 23:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The second one has better performance on large lists than the first one. Intersect puts the elements of one list into a hash table before checking the other list's elements for membership.

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I thought in the second case, the intersection of two lists will be calculated, and only then Any will be executed. Am I wrong? –  MainMa Feb 20 '11 at 22:58
    
The intersection is calculated lazily. I think it first creates a hashset out of list2 and then goes over list1 returning and adding to the hashset as it goes along. –  CodesInChaos Feb 20 '11 at 23:00
    
@MainMa - yes, you are wrong on that. It will hash the first set, then use an iterator block to spool over the second. At each point you are only returning a single match. Iterator blocks do not run to completion before returning content. There is no need to calculate the full set of matches in a collection. The only time Any() would run to completion is if it returned false - otherwise it would short-circuit the sequence at the first match. –  Marc Gravell Feb 20 '11 at 23:02
1  
Yes, you are wrong. You can imagine it as working in the same fashion that your break does in the loop. The intersection is calculated lazily, and once the first element is found to be present in it, Any() returns and no more are checked. –  mquander Feb 20 '11 at 23:02

It seems odd to critique the performance of LINQ when the original is clearly (worst case) O(n*m); the LINQ approach would I expect use a HashSet<T> on a list, and then use a streaming iterator block - so the performance should be O(n+m) - i.e. better.

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I think the second one will be faster for large lists. Since the first one is O(list1.Count*list2.Count) whereas the second is O(list1.Count+list2.Count). Second one takes more memory though.

And the overhead of linq is typically a constant multiplication factor over handcrafted code. I'd guess the second one is slower than imperative code by at most a factor of two, probably not even that. It uses O(list1.Count+list2.Count) memory which can be cut down to O(Min(list1,list2)) if you carefully write your code for low memory usage whilte retaining linear performance.

This code should be relatively fast on large lists:

bool isFound = false;
HashSet<string> set2=new HashSet<string>(list2);
foreach (item1 in list1)
{
    if (set2.Contains(item1))
    {
        isFound = true;
        break;
    }
}

You can optimize this code further by making the smaller list into a hashset instead of always using list2.

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The accepted answer is great, however it does not work with Linq-to-sql, since there's no mapping for Intersect. In that case you should use :

bool isFound = table.Any(row => list2.Contains(row.FieldWithValue));

This gets compiled to WHERE EXSITS

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