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I'd like to stretch 6 nav items evenly across a 900px container, with an even amount of white space between. For instance...

---| 900px Container |---

---| HOME    ABOUT    BASIC SERVICES    SPECIALTY SERVICES    OUR STAFF    CONTACT US |---

Currently, the best method I can find to do this is the following:

nav ul {
  width: 900px; 
  margin: 0 auto;
}

nav li {
  line-height: 87px;
  float: left;
  text-align: center;
  width: 150px;
}

The PROBLEM with this is two fold. First of all, it doesn't truly justify it, but rather spreads the li tags evenly throughout the ul tag.. creating uneven white-space between smaller menu items like "HOME" or "ABOUT" and larger ones like "BASIC SERVICES".

The second problem is that the layout breaks if a nav item is larger than 150px, which SPECIALTY SERVICES is - even though there is more than enough space for the whole nav.

Can anyone solve this for me? I've been scouring the web for solutions, and they all seem to come up short. CSS / HTML only if possible...

Thanks!

UPDATE (7/29/13): Using table-cell is the best modern way to implement this layout. See felix's answer below. The table cell property works on 94% of browsers currently. You'll have to do something about IE7 and below, but otherwise should be ok.

UPDATE (7/30/13): Unfortunately, there is a webkit bug that impacts this if you're combining this layout with Media Queries. For now you'll have to avoid changing the 'display' property. See Webkit Bug.

UPDATE (7/25/14): There is a better solution to this below now involving text-align: justify. Using this is simpler and you'll avoid the Webkit bug.

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14 Answers 14

up vote 26 down vote accepted

This one really works. Also has the benefit that you can use media queries to easily turn off the horizontal style — for instance if you want to stack them vertically when on mobile phone.

HTML

<ul id="nav">
    <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
</ul>

CSS

​
#nav {
    display: table;
    height: 87px;
    width: 100%;
}

#nav li {
    display: table-cell;
    height: 87px;
    width: 16.666666667%;  /* (100 / numItems)% */
    line-height: 87px;
    text-align: center;
    background: #ddd;
    border-right: 1px solid #fff;
    white-space: nowrap;
}​

@media (max-width: 767px) {
    #nav li {
        display: block;
        width: 100%;
    }
}

http://jsfiddle.net/timshutes/eCPSh/416/

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1  
Not a bad solution. –  jasonflaherty May 16 '13 at 15:42
4  
This solution doesn't solve the problem, putting in a longer title in the li makes the white space bigger again instead of using the same whitespace as between the other items –  Jeroen W Jun 26 '13 at 10:44
    
if the number of items is fixed then in the CSS you can set a percentage width of (1.0/numItems * 100)%. this will give exact evenly spaced cols. –  felix Jun 26 '13 at 10:55
    
This solution is the best modern solution. It doesn't work on ie7 but that can be dealt with. There is one piece of code missing though for the layout described: width: 16.666666667%; or as Felix said above "(1.0/numItems * 100)%. I added this into your answer via an edit since you had it here in the comments. –  timshutes Jul 29 '13 at 18:49

An ideal solution will:

  1. Automatically scale to the width of the navigation container
  2. Support a dynamic number of menu items.

Using a simple ul menu inside of an nav container, we can build a solution that meets the above requirements.

HTML

<nav>
  <ul>
    <li>Home</li>
    <li>About</li>
    <li>Basic Services</li>
    <li>Specialty Services</li>
    <li>Our Staff</li>
    <li>Contact Us</li>
  </ul>
</nav>

First, we need to force the ul to have the full width of its nav container. To accomplish this, we will use the :after psuedo-element with width: 100%.

This achieves our goal perfectly, but adds trailing whitespace from the psuedo-element. We can remove this whitespace across all browsers through IE8 by setting the line-height of the ul to 0 and setting it back to 100% on its li children. See the example CodePen and solution below:

CSS

nav {
  width: 900px;
}

nav ul {
  text-align: justify;
  line-height: 0;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
}

nav ul:after {
  content: '';
  display: inline-block;
  width: 100%;
}

nav ul li {
  display: inline-block;
  line-height: 100%;
}
share|improve this answer
    
If you want really nice thing, you would set nav ul width to something like 90%, and set margin-left, margin-right to auto to have those nice paddings from left and right, check CodePen –  Gabrielius Dec 4 '14 at 16:26
    
works for N items, thanks! :D –  Dane Macaulay Jan 28 at 17:45

Ok in it's simplest form like this i think.

HTML

 <nav>
      <ul>
          <li id="left"><a href="index.html">Portfolio</a></li>
          <li><a href="about.html">About</a></li>
          <li id="right"><a href="contact.html">Contact</a></li>
      </ul>
 </nav>

CSS

nav ul li {
    float: left;
    display: block;
    width: 33.33%;
}  
#left {
    text-align: left;
}  
#right {
    text-align: right;
}

I discussed this with a couple of mentors this evening. They solved this for my situation.

To set to a page width you'd look at wrapping and setting margin. That's a subject on other threads I'm sure.

Obviously width would be 25% for 4 items, 20% for 5, etc etc, you get the idea.

So in answer to the post in question. he would wrap his ul and 6 list items each 16.6666% wide in a wrapper 900 pixels wide. then apply a zero auto margin to the wrapper, aligning his text to suit.

Hope this helps someone.

/Ignore my earlier post I'm still working on that menu. I may update it to correct it later or remove it if it doesn't work/

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The way I achieved what I needed like this where I have an image in middle and odd numbers of menu items each side:

<ul>
  <a href="#"><li id="li-left">About</li></a>
  <a href="#"><li>Care Process</li></a>
  <a href="#"><li>Case Studies</li></a>
  <a href="http://homecare.none of your business.com"><img src="http://homecare.noneofyourbusiness.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/site-logo.png"></a>
  <a href="#"><li>Funding</li></a>
  <a href="#"><li>Q&A's</li></a>
  <a href="#"><li>Jobs</li></a>
  <a href="#"><li id="li-right">Contact</li></a>
</ul>

And here's the CSS:

#header ul {
  width: 100%;
  text-align: center;
  margin: 0 auto;
  z-index: 9999;
}

#header li {
  list-style: none;
  display: inline-block;
  /*padding: 1.5%;*/
  margin: 0 1.9% 0 1.9%;
  color: #756583;
  text-transform: uppercase;
  z-index: 9999;
  text-align: center;
}

#li-left {
  margin-left: 0 !important;
}

#li-right {
  margin-right: 0 !important;
}

#header img {
  margin-top: -10px;
  margin-bottom: 10px;
}

Bit of a rough way to do it but it got me what I wanted. I hope it may helps someone.

Of course you don't need the z-index and other selectors... I just copied those in.

Perhaps you could id and pull your left and right items further with negative margin values ( I didn't try that though).

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if you can, use flexbox:

<ul>
    <li>HOME</li>
    <li>ABOUT US</li>
    <li>SERVICES</li>
    <li>PREVIOUS PROJECTS</li>
    <li>TESTIMONIALS</li>
    <li>NEWS</li>
    <li>RESEARCH &amp; DEV</li>
    <li>CONTACT</li>
</ul>

ul {
  display: flex;
  justify-content:space-between;
  list-style-type: none;
}

jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/RAaJ8/

Browser support is actually quite good (with prefixes an other nasty stuff): http://caniuse.com/flexbox

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Use text-align:justify on the container, this way it will work no matter how many elements you have in your list (you don't have to work out % widths for each list item

FIDDLE

<ul id="nav">
    <li><a href="#">HOME</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">ABOUT</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">BASIC SERVICES</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">OUR STAFF</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">CONTACT US</a></li>
</ul>

CSS

#nav {
    text-align: justify;
    min-width: 500px;
}
#nav:after {
    content: '';
    display: inline-block;
    width: 100%;
}
#nav li {
    display: inline-block;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The :after-style is key :) –  Tim Sep 5 '13 at 18:32
1  
excellent solution. –  Thomasz Sep 10 '13 at 15:39
5  
This works because text-align: justify ensures that all lines are the same length. The :after style being set to display: inline-block with width: 100% creates a full-width child element within the nav for justify to match the length of. –  Anthony DiSanti Oct 23 '13 at 9:00
2  
New question regarding extra unwanted vertical space, along with fiddle, here: stackoverflow.com/questions/20134151/… –  North Krimsly Nov 21 '13 at 23:38
1  
really nice solution. thanks –  Antoine Mouquod May 8 '14 at 11:00

I tried all the above and found them wanting. This is the simplest most flexible solution I could figure out (thanks to all of the above for inspiration).

HTML

<div id="container">
<ul>
    <li>HOME</li>
    <li>ABOUT US</li>
    <li>SERVICES</li>
    <li>PREVIOUS PROJECTS</li>
    <li>TESTIMONIALS</li>
    <li>NEWS</li>
    <li>RESEARCH &amp; DEV</li>
    <li>CONTACT</li>
</ul>
</div>

CSS

div#container{
  width:900px;
  background-color:#eee;
    padding:20px;
}
ul {
    display:table;
    width: 100%;
    margin:0 0;
    -webkit-padding-start:0px; /* reset chrome default */
}
ul li {
    display:table-cell;
    height:30px;
    line-height:30px;
    font-size:12px;    
    padding:20px 10px;
    text-align: center;
    background-color:#999;
    border-right:2px solid #fff;
}
ul li:first-child {
    border-radius:10px 0 0 10px;
}
ul li:last-child {
    border-radius:0 10px 10px 0;
    border-right:0 none;
}

You can drop the first/last child-rounded ends, obviously, but I think they're real purdy (and so does your client ;)

The container width limits the horizontal list, but you can ditch this and just apply an absolute value to the UL if you like.

Fiddle with it, if you like..

http://jsfiddle.net/tobyworth/esehY/1/

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<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
<style>
#container { width: 100%; border: 1px solid black; display: block; text-align: justify; }
object, span { display: inline-block; }
span { width: 100%; }
</style>
</head>

  <div id="container">
    <object>
      <div>
      alpha
      </div>
    </object>
    <object>
      <div>
      beta
      </div>
    </object>
    <object>
      <div>
      charlie
      </div>
    </object>
    <object>
      <div>
      delta
      </div>
    </object>
    <object>
      <div>
      epsilon
      </div>
    </object>
    <object>
      <div>
      foxtrot
      </div>
    </object>
    <span></span>
  </div>
</html>
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I tried so many different things and finally found what worked best for me was simply adding in padding-right: 28px;

I played around with the padding to get the right amount to evenly space the items.

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I'm hesitant to offer this as it misuses ye olde html. It's not a GOOD solution but it is a solution: use a table.

CSS:

table.navigation {
    width: 990px;
}
table.navigation td {
    text-align: center;
}

HTML:

<table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" border="0" class="navigation">
    <tr>
        <td>HOME</td>
        <td>ABOUT</td>
        <td>BASIC SERVICES</td>
        <td>SPECIALTY SERVICES</td>
        <td>OUR STAFF</td>
        <td>CONTACT US</td>
    </tr>
</table>

This is not what tables were created to do but until we can reliably perform the same action in a better way I guess it is just about permissable.

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This should do it for you.

<div id="nav-wrap">
    <ul id="nav">
        <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
    </ul>
</div>

#nav-wrap {
    float: left;
    height: 87px;
    width: 900px;
}

#nav {
    display: inline;
    height: 87px;
    width: 100%;
}

.nav-item {
    float: left;
    height: 87px;
    line-height: 87px;
    text-align: center;
    text-decoration: none;
    width: 150px;

}
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This is the sort of thing that the CSS flexbox model will fix, because it will let you specify that each li will receive an equal proportion of the remaining width.

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3  
From your lips to God's ears. Sadly, the only recent improvement I have seen in browsers so far is that our major customer recently moved from IE6 to 7. Woohoo! I suspect I will be able to take advantage of flexbox sometime around 2020. ;-) –  BJ Safdie Feb 21 '11 at 0:53

Instead of defining the width, you could just put a margin-left on your li, so that the spacing is consistent, and just make sure the margin(s)+li fit within 900px.

nav li {
  line-height: 87px;
  float: left;
  text-align: center;
  margin-left: 35px;
}

Hope this helps.

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Have you tried setting the li width to, say, 16% with a margin of 0.5%?

nav li {
  line-height: 87px;
  float: left;
  text-align: center;
  width: 16%;
  margin-right: 0.5%;
}

edit: I would set the UL to 100% width:

nav ul { width: 100%; margin: 0 auto; }

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