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This is what I've come up with as a method on a class inherited by many of my other classes. The idea is that it allows the simple comparison between properties of Objects of the same Type.

Now, this does work - but in the interest of improving the quality of my code I thought I'd throw it out for scrutiny. How can it be better/more efficient/etc.?

/// <summary>
/// Compare property values (as strings)
/// </summary>
/// <param name="obj"></param>
/// <returns></returns>
public bool PropertiesEqual(object comparisonObject)
{

    Type sourceType = this.GetType();
    Type destinationType = comparisonObject.GetType();

    if (sourceType == destinationType)
    {
        PropertyInfo[] sourceProperties = sourceType.GetProperties();
        foreach (PropertyInfo pi in sourceProperties)
        {
            if ((sourceType.GetProperty(pi.Name).GetValue(this, null) == null && destinationType.GetProperty(pi.Name).GetValue(comparisonObject, null) == null))
            {
                // if both are null, don't try to compare  (throws exception)
            }
            else if (!(sourceType.GetProperty(pi.Name).GetValue(this, null).ToString() == destinationType.GetProperty(pi.Name).GetValue(comparisonObject, null).ToString()))
            {
                // only need one property to be different to fail Equals.
                return false;
            }
        }
    }
    else
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("Comparison object must be of the same type.","comparisonObject");
    }

    return true;
}
share|improve this question
1  
    
This looks like it may work. Tweaking it now to check. Thank you so much! –  SamuelDavis Jun 10 '13 at 1:28
    
By the way are you aware of this SE site: codereview.stackexchange.com –  wil Mar 20 at 1:55

14 Answers 14

up vote 60 down vote accepted

I was looking for a snippet of code that would do something similar to help with writing unit test. Here is what I ended up using.

public static bool PublicInstancePropertiesEqual<T>(T self, T to, params string[] ignore) where T : class 
  {
     if (self != null && to != null)
     {
        Type type = typeof(T);
        List<string> ignoreList = new List<string>(ignore);
        foreach (System.Reflection.PropertyInfo pi in type.GetProperties(System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Public | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Instance))
        {
           if (!ignoreList.Contains(pi.Name))
           {
              object selfValue = type.GetProperty(pi.Name).GetValue(self, null);
              object toValue = type.GetProperty(pi.Name).GetValue(to, null);

              if (selfValue != toValue && (selfValue == null || !selfValue.Equals(toValue)))
              {
                 return false;
              }
           }
        }
        return true;
     }
     return self == to;
  }

EDIT:

Same code as above but uses LINQ and Extension methods :

public static bool PublicInstancePropertiesEqual<T>(this T self, T to, params string[] ignore) where T : class
{
    if (self != null && to != null)
    {
        var type = typeof(T);
        var ignoreList = new List<string>(ignore);
        var unequalProperties =
            from pi in type.GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance)
            where !ignoreList.Contains(pi.Name)
            let selfValue = type.GetProperty(pi.Name).GetValue(self, null)
            let toValue = type.GetProperty(pi.Name).GetValue(to, null)
            where selfValue != toValue && (selfValue == null || !selfValue.Equals(toValue))
            select selfValue;
        return !unequalProperties.Any();
    }
    return self == to;
}
share|improve this answer

You can optimize your code by calling GetProperties only once per type:

public static string ToStringNullSafe(this object obj)
{
    return obj != null ? obj.ToString() : String.Empty;
}
public static bool Compare<T>(T a, T b, params string[] ignore)
{
    var aProps = a.GetType().GetProperties();
    var bProps = b.GetType().GetProperties();
    int count = aProps.Count();
    string aa, bb;
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
        aa = aProps[i].GetValue(a, null).ToStringNullSafe();
        bb = bProps[i].GetValue(b, null).ToStringNullSafe();
        if (aa != bb && ignore.Where(x => x == aProps[i].Name).Count() == 0)
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer

I think the answer of Big T was quite good but the deep comparison was missing, so I tweaked it a little bit:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Reflection;

/// <summary>Comparison class.</summary>
public static class Compare
{
    /// <summary>Compare the public instance properties. Uses deep comparison.</summary>
    /// <param name="self">The reference object.</param>
    /// <param name="to">The object to compare.</param>
    /// <param name="ignore">Ignore property with name.</param>
    /// <typeparam name="T">Type of objects.</typeparam>
    /// <returns><see cref="bool">True</see> if both objects are equal, else <see cref="bool">false</see>.</returns>
    public static bool PublicInstancePropertiesEqual<T>(T self, T to, params string[] ignore) where T : class
    {
        if (self != null && to != null)
        {
            var type = self.GetType();
            var ignoreList = new List<string>(ignore);
            foreach (var pi in type.GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance))
            {
                if (ignoreList.Contains(pi.Name))
                {
                    continue;
                }

                var selfValue = type.GetProperty(pi.Name).GetValue(self, null);
                var toValue = type.GetProperty(pi.Name).GetValue(to, null);

                if (pi.PropertyType.IsClass && !pi.PropertyType.Module.ScopeName.Equals("CommonLanguageRuntimeLibrary"))
                {
                    // Check of "CommonLanguageRuntimeLibrary" is needed because string is also a class
                    if (PublicInstancePropertiesEqual(selfValue, toValue, ignore))
                    {
                        continue;
                    }

                    return false;
                }

                if (selfValue != toValue && (selfValue == null || !selfValue.Equals(toValue)))
                {
                    return false;
                }
            }

            return true;
        }

        return self == to;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If performance doesn't matter, you could serialize them and compare the results:

var serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(TheObjectType));
StringWriter serialized1 = new StringWriter(), serialized2 = new StringWriter();
serializer.Serialize(serialized1, obj1);
serializer.Serialize(serialized2, obj2);
bool areEqual = serialized1.ToString() == serialized2.ToString();
share|improve this answer
    
tried this a whila ago, you would wonder how many objects are not serializable ... –  Offler Dec 4 '12 at 10:59

I ended up doing this:

    public static string ToStringNullSafe(this object obj)
    {
        return obj != null ? obj.ToString() : String.Empty;
    }
    public static bool Compare<T>(T a, T b)
    {
        int count = a.GetType().GetProperties().Count();
        string aa, bb;
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            aa = a.GetType().GetProperties()[i].GetValue(a, null).ToStringNullSafe();
            bb = b.GetType().GetProperties()[i].GetValue(b, null).ToStringNullSafe();
            if (aa != bb)
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }

Usage:

    if (Compare<ObjectType>(a, b))

Update

If you want to ignore some properties by name:

    public static string ToStringNullSafe(this object obj)
    {
        return obj != null ? obj.ToString() : String.Empty;
    }
    public static bool Compare<T>(T a, T b, params string[] ignore)
    {
        int count = a.GetType().GetProperties().Count();
        string aa, bb;
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            aa = a.GetType().GetProperties()[i].GetValue(a, null).ToStringNullSafe();
            bb = b.GetType().GetProperties()[i].GetValue(b, null).ToStringNullSafe();
            if (aa != bb && ignore.Where(x => x == a.GetType().GetProperties()[i].Name).Count() == 0)
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }

Usage:

    if (MyFunction.Compare<ObjType>(a, b, "Id","AnotherProp"))
share|improve this answer

The limitations I see in your code:

  • The biggest one is that it doesn't do a deep object comparison.

  • It doesn't do an element by element comparison in case properties are lists or contain lists as elements (this can go n-levels).

  • It doesn't take into account that some type of properties should not be compared (e.g. a Func property used for filtering purposes, like the one in the PagedCollectionView class).

  • It doesn't keep track of what properties actually were different (so you can show in your assertions).

I was looking today for some solution for unit-testing purposes to do property by property deep comparison and I ended up using: http://comparenetobjects.codeplex.com.

It is a free library with just one class which you can simply use like this:

var compareObjects = new CompareObjects()
{
    CompareChildren = true, //this turns deep compare one, otherwise it's shallow
    CompareFields = false,
    CompareReadOnly = true,
    ComparePrivateFields = false,
    ComparePrivateProperties = false,
    CompareProperties = true,
    MaxDifferences = 1,
    ElementsToIgnore = new List<string>() { "Filter" }
};

Assert.IsTrue(
    compareObjects.Compare(objectA, objectB), 
    compareObjects.DifferencesString
);

Also, it can be easily re-compiled for Silverlight. Just copy the one class into a Silverlight project and remove one or two lines of code for comparisons that are not available in Silverlight, like private members comparison.

share|improve this answer
1  
Liviu, I noticed your comment about the class not being compatible with Silverlight. I just changed it to be compatible with Silverlight and Windows Phone 7. Do a get latest. See change set 74131 at comparenetobjects.codeplex.com/SourceControl/list/changesets –  Greg ''Wildman'' Finzer Apr 14 '12 at 14:12
    
This looks promising. Gonna try it out –  DJ Burb Feb 20 '13 at 6:12
    
this works great –  DJ Burb Feb 20 '13 at 7:29
    
Thank you for the great example! Also, IgnoreObjectTypes setting might be useful when there are different types. –  Sergey Brunov Oct 1 '13 at 8:31
    
Version 2.0 has a Portable Class Library version that is compatible with Silverlight 5+, Windows Phone 8+, WinRT 8+, Xamarin IOS and Xamarin Droid –  Greg ''Wildman'' Finzer May 22 at 14:43

I think it would be best to follow the pattern for Override Object#Equals()
For a better description: Read Bill Wagner's Effective C# - Item 9 I think

public override Equals(object obOther)
{
  if (null == obOther)
    return false;
  if (object.ReferenceEquals(this, obOther)
    return true;
  if (this.GetType() != obOther.GetType())
    return false;
  # private method to compare members.
  return CompareMembers(this, obOther as ThisClass);
}
  • Also in methods that check for equality, you should return either true or false. either they are equal or they are not.. instead of throwing an exception, return false.
  • I'd consider overriding Object#Equals.
  • Even though you must have considered this, using Reflection to compare properties is supposedly slow (I dont have numbers to back this up). This is the default behavior for valueType#Equals in C# and it is recommended that you override Equals for value types and do a member wise compare for performance. (Earlier I speed-read this as you have a collection of custom Property objects... my bad.)

Update-Dec 2011:

  • Of course, if the type already has a production Equals() then you need another approach.
  • If you're using this to compare immutable data structures exclusively for test purposes, you shouldn't add an Equals to production classes (Someone might hose the tests by chainging the Equals implementation or you may prevent creation of a production-required Equals implementation).
share|improve this answer
    
I ran into problems with overriding .Equals() because i'm trying to implement this on a base class that gets inherited... because I don't know the keys for the class this'll be run against, i can't implement a decent override for GetHasCode() (req'd when you override Equals()). –  nailitdown Feb 3 '09 at 7:07
    
The requirement is that if objA.Equals(objB) then objA.GetHashCode() == objB.GetHashCode(). GetHashCode should not be dependent on mutable state/data of a class... I didnt get what you meant by keys for the class.. Seems like something that can be solved. Doesn't the base type have the 'keys'? –  Gishu Feb 3 '09 at 8:24

I would add the following line to the PublicInstancePropertiesEqual method to avoid copy & paste errors:

Assert.AreNotSame(self, to);
share|improve this answer

This works even if the objects are different. you could customize the methods in the utilities class maybe you want to compare private properties as well...

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

class ObjectA
{
    public string PropertyA { get; set; }
    public string PropertyB { get; set; }
    public string PropertyC { get; set; }
    public DateTime PropertyD { get; set; }

    public string FieldA;
    public DateTime FieldB;
}

class ObjectB
{
    public string PropertyA { get; set; }
    public string PropertyB { get; set; }
    public string PropertyC { get; set; }
    public DateTime PropertyD { get; set; }


    public string FieldA;
    public DateTime FieldB;


}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // create two objects with same properties
        ObjectA a = new ObjectA() { PropertyA = "test", PropertyB = "test2", PropertyC = "test3" };
        ObjectB b = new ObjectB() { PropertyA = "test", PropertyB = "test2", PropertyC = "test3" };

        // add fields to those objects
        a.FieldA = "hello";
        b.FieldA = "Something differnt";

        if (a.ComparePropertiesTo(b))
        {
            Console.WriteLine("objects have the same properties");
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("objects have diferent properties!");
        }


        if (a.CompareFieldsTo(b))
        {
            Console.WriteLine("objects have the same Fields");
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("objects have diferent Fields!");
        }

        Console.Read();
    }
}

public static class Utilities
{
    public static bool ComparePropertiesTo(this Object a, Object b)
    {
        System.Reflection.PropertyInfo[] properties = a.GetType().GetProperties(); // get all the properties of object a

        foreach (var property in properties)
        {
            var propertyName = property.Name;

            var aValue = a.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName).GetValue(a, null);
            object bValue;

            try // try to get the same property from object b. maybe that property does
                // not exist! 
            {
                bValue = b.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName).GetValue(b, null);
            }
            catch
            {
                return false;
            }

            if (aValue == null && bValue == null)
                continue;

            if (aValue == null && bValue != null)
                return false;

            if (aValue != null && bValue == null)
               return false;

            // if properties do not match return false
            if (aValue.GetHashCode() != bValue.GetHashCode())
            {
                return false;
            }
        }

        return true;
    }



    public static bool CompareFieldsTo(this Object a, Object b)
    {
        System.Reflection.FieldInfo[] fields = a.GetType().GetFields(); // get all the properties of object a

        foreach (var field in fields)
        {
            var fieldName = field.Name;

            var aValue = a.GetType().GetField(fieldName).GetValue(a);

            object bValue;

            try // try to get the same property from object b. maybe that property does
            // not exist! 
            {
                bValue = b.GetType().GetField(fieldName).GetValue(b);
            }
            catch
            {
                return false;
            }

            if (aValue == null && bValue == null)
               continue;

            if (aValue == null && bValue != null)
               return false;

            if (aValue != null && bValue == null)
               return false;


            // if properties do not match return false
            if (aValue.GetHashCode() != bValue.GetHashCode())
            {
                return false;
            }
        }

        return true;
    }


}
share|improve this answer
    
That code is not 100% efficient. it does not work in some situations for example if it contains a property of type object. –  Tono Nam Dec 1 '11 at 18:24

here is revised one to treat null = null as equal

 private bool PublicInstancePropertiesEqual<T>(T self, T to, params string[] ignore) where T : class
        {
            if (self != null && to != null)
            {
                Type type = typeof(T);
                List<string> ignoreList = new List<string>(ignore);
                foreach (PropertyInfo pi in type.GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance))
                {
                    if (!ignoreList.Contains(pi.Name))
                    {
                        object selfValue = type.GetProperty(pi.Name).GetValue(self, null);
                        object toValue = type.GetProperty(pi.Name).GetValue(to, null);
                        if (selfValue != null)
                        {
                            if (!selfValue.Equals(toValue))
                                return false;
                        }
                        else if (toValue != null)
                            return false;
                    }
                }
                return true;
            }
            return self == to;
        }
share|improve this answer
    
What if I had a deep object graph what's the best way to use above to return a list of old and new properties that were changed? –  Rod Jul 13 '11 at 18:34

The first thing I would suggest would be to split up the actual comparison so that it's a bit more readable (I've also taken out the ToString() - is that needed?):

else {
    object originalProperty = sourceType.GetProperty(pi.Name).GetValue(this, null);
    object comparisonProperty = destinationType.GetProperty(pi.Name).GetValue(comparisonObject, null);

    if (originalProperty != comparisonProperty)
    	return false;

The next suggestion would be to minimise the use of reflection as much as possible - it's really slow. I mean, really slow. If you are going to do this, I would suggest caching the property references. I'm not intimately familiar with the Reflection API, so if this is a bit off, just adjust to make it compile:

// elsewhere
Dictionary<object, Property[]> lookupDictionary = new Dictionary<object, Property[]>;

Property[] objectProperties = null;
if (lookupDictionary.ContainsKey(sourceType)) {
  objectProperties = lookupProperties[sourceType];
} else {
  // build array of Property references
  PropertyInfo[] sourcePropertyInfos = sourceType.GetProperties();
  Property[] sourceProperties = new Property[sourcePropertyInfos.length];
  for (int i=0; i < sourcePropertyInfos.length; i++) {
    sourceProperties[i] = sourceType.GetProperty(pi.Name);
  }
  // add to cache
  objectProperties = sourceProperties;
  lookupDictionary[object] = sourceProperties;
}

// loop through and compare against the instances

However, I have to say that I agree with the other posters. This smells lazy and inefficient. You should be implementing IComparable instead :-).

share|improve this answer
    
I was just looking at IComparable but it seemed like it was for sorting and ordering.. is it really useful for comparing the equality of two objects? –  nailitdown Feb 3 '09 at 7:02
    
Absolutely, because .Equals(object o) is defined as this.CompareTo(o) == 0. So, equals uses ComparesTo() to determine equality. This will be much more efficient (and standard practice) than using reflection. –  Travis Feb 4 '09 at 0:19
    
I may be mistaken assuming that Equals is implemented (or should be implemented) with reference to CompareTo(). You should consider overriding Equals as described here: stackoverflow.com/questions/104158/… –  Travis Feb 4 '09 at 0:34

If you are only comparing objects of the same type or further down the inheritance chain, why not specify the parameter as your base type, rather than object ?

Also do null checks on the parameter as well.

Furthermore I'd make use of 'var' just to make the code more readable (if its c#3 code)

Also, if the object has reference types as properties then you are just calling ToString() on them which doesn't really compare values. If ToString isn't overwridden then its just going to return the type name as a string which could return false-positives.

share|improve this answer
    
good point on the reference types - in my case it doesn't matter but there's a good chance it would. –  nailitdown Feb 3 '09 at 7:14

Do you override .ToString() on all of your objects that are in the properties? Otherwise, that second comparison could come back with null.

Also, in that second comparison, I'm on the fence about the construct of !( A == B) compared to (A != B), in terms of readability six months/two years from now. The line itself is pretty wide, which is ok if you've got a wide monitor, but might not print out very well. (nitpick)

Are all of your objects always using properties such that this code will work? Could there be some internal, non-propertied data that could be different from one object to another, but all exposed data is the same? I'm thinking of some data which could change over time, like two random number generators that happen to hit the same number at one point, but are going to produce two different sequences of information, or just any data that doesn't get exposed through the property interface.

share|improve this answer
    
good points - != ... agreed, point taken. ToString() was an attempt to workaround .GetValue returning an object (thus the comparison always false, as it's a ref compare).. is there a better way? –  nailitdown Feb 3 '09 at 6:05
    
If GetValue is returning an object, can you recurse through this function again? ie, call PropertiesEqual on the returned objects? –  mmr Feb 3 '09 at 6:23

make sure objects aren't null.

having obj1 and obj2:

 if( obj1 == null )
      {
         return false;
      }

 return obj1.Equals( obj2 );
share|improve this answer
    
what if they're both null? aren't they then equal? –  mmr Feb 3 '09 at 5:47
    
good point on nulls, in my case using .Equals() doesn't seem to work, which is why i've come up with this solution –  nailitdown Feb 3 '09 at 5:50
    
Why does it not work ? –  Gishu Feb 3 '09 at 6:11
    
well, the case i'm testing for is two objects, one newly created, one from the session. comparing the two with .Equals() returns false even though both have identical property values –  nailitdown Feb 3 '09 at 7:05

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