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I have user table in SQL Server 2008 r2. Nothing there is encrypted yet but I would like to at the least encrypt the passwords until the app is ready that will handle this better. Can i do this and how? to manually make the passwords encrypted.

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6 Answers 6

up vote -3 down vote accepted

yes you should have to do that in code, you could use any algorith to encript, i recommend you the md5 it is very secure and it can not be decrypt. :)

for example:

public string EncodePassword(string originalPassword)
{
//Declarations
Byte[] originalBytes;
Byte[] encodedBytes;
MD5 md5;

//Instantiate MD5CryptoServiceProvider, get bytes for original password and compute hash    (encoded password)
md5 = new MD5CryptoServiceProvider();
originalBytes = ASCIIEncoding.Default.GetBytes(originalPassword);
encodedBytes = md5.ComputeHash(originalBytes);

//Convert encoded bytes back to a 'readable' string
return BitConverter.ToString(encodedBytes);
}
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4  
don't use md5, it isn't secure. Reliable collision creation is working for some time now. SHA1 is also broken, but the collision creation takes longer. If you want a secure hash algorithm, use SHA2. It is reliable, at least for the time being. –  Femaref Feb 20 '11 at 23:58
1  
MD5 is broken and is not advisable to use. –  user479911 Feb 20 '11 at 23:59
3  
MD5 is not "very secury." If you're concerned about security, use a SHA-256 algorithm and a salt. –  Paul Schreiber Feb 20 '11 at 23:59
    
it depends on the scurity needs, I think MD5 is enought on the 90% of the cases and it is really easy to use. –  JAiro Feb 21 '11 at 0:01
1  
Sha1 and Sha2 are easily useable as well and way more secure. –  Femaref Feb 21 '11 at 0:14

You can encrypt columns using SQL Server, ( see: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms179331.aspx for a walk-through).

You can also use a key given out from the server itself.

The risk of using this is if you had to do data recovery and move the DB to a different server it would be impossible to decrypt the column (reset passwords would be required).

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Note: password hashing is not meant for 2-way encryption (where a rogue dba can decrypt it). It is meant for hashing it in a way that allows validation without trivially showing the password to anyone. A low or even moderate level of collisions is in some ways desirable so that it allows the password through (and unfortunately other variants) but with collisions you can never tell what the real password actually was.


A simple implementation would be to run HashBytes over the password. You compare the (hash of) password provided to the hash stored. Unless someone has a rainbow table ready, they will not be able to find the original password.

INSERT INTO <tbl> (..., passwd) values (...., HashBytes('SHA1', @password))

When validating passwords, you take the hash of the password

SELECT HashBytes('SHA1', @password);

And compare it against the input.

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There are mathematical weaknesses with SHA-1. Please use SHA-2. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SHA-2 –  rushonerok Apr 6 '12 at 13:21
2  
When the tag sql-server-2008 is removed, you can use SHA-2, but not before. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms174415%28v=sql.105%29.aspx –  RichardTheKiwi Apr 6 '12 at 15:05

You actually don't want to encrypt it, but rather use a hash function on it. Unless there is an strong requirement to gain access to the unencrypted password.

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We can Create some simple sql function to encrypt and decrypt the Password column in your web page:

Code:Encryption

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[ENCRYPT] (
@DB_ROLE_PASSWORD VARCHAR(MAX) ) RETURNS VARCHAR(MAX) AS
BEGIN
DECLARE
@STR_LEN NUMERIC(10),
@ENCRYPTED_PASSWORD VARCHAR(100),
@TRIAL_CHARACTER VARCHAR(1),
@TRIAL_NUMBER NUMERIC(4) SET @ENCRYPTED_PASSWORD = NULL
SET @STR_LEN =LEN(@DB_ROLE_PASSWORD) DECLARE
@I INT
SET @I = 1
DECLARE
@LOOP$BOUND INT SET @LOOP$BOUND = @STR_LEN
WHILE @I <= @LOOP$BOUND
BEGIN
/* * SSMA WARNING MESSAGES: * O2SS0273: ORACLE SUBSTR FUNCTION AND SQL SERVER SUBSTRING FUNCTION MAY GIVE DIFFERENT RESULTS. */
SET @TRIAL_CHARACTER = SUBSTRING(@DB_ROLE_PASSWORD, @I, 1)
SET @TRIAL_NUMBER = ASCII(@TRIAL_CHARACTER)
IF (@TRIAL_NUMBER % 2) = 0
SET @TRIAL_NUMBER = @TRIAL_NUMBER - 6
ELSE
SET @TRIAL_NUMBER = @TRIAL_NUMBER - 8
SET @TRIAL_CHARACTER = CHAR(CAST(@TRIAL_NUMBER + @I AS INT)) SET @ENCRYPTED_PASSWORD = ISNULL(@ENCRYPTED_PASSWORD, '') + ISNULL(@TRIAL_CHARACTER, '') SET @I = @I + 1
END
RETURN @ENCRYPTED_PASSWORD END

Code:Decryption

`CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[DECRYPT] ( @DB_ROLE_PASSWORD VARCHAR(MAX) ) RETURNS VARCHAR(MAX) AS

BEGIN

  DECLARE
     @STR_LEN NUMERIC(10), 
     @DECRYPTED_PASSWORD VARCHAR(100), 
     @TRIAL_CHARACTER VARCHAR(1), 
     @TRIAL_NUMBER NUMERIC(4), 
     @CHECK_CHARACTER VARCHAR(1), 
     @V_DB_ROLE_PASSWORD VARCHAR(100)

  SET @V_DB_ROLE_PASSWORD = @DB_ROLE_PASSWORD

  SET @DECRYPTED_PASSWORD = NULL

  SET @STR_LEN = LEN(@V_DB_ROLE_PASSWORD)

  DECLARE
     @I INT

  SET @I = 1

  DECLARE
     @LOOP$BOUND INT

  SET @LOOP$BOUND = @STR_LEN

  WHILE @I <= @LOOP$BOUND

     BEGIN

        /*
        *   SSMA WARNING MESSAGES:
        *   O2SS0273: ORACLE SUBSTR FUNCTION AND SQL SERVER SUBSTRING FUNCTION MAY GIVE DIFFERENT RESULTS.
        */

        SET @TRIAL_CHARACTER = SUBSTRING(@V_DB_ROLE_PASSWORD, @I, 1)

        SET @TRIAL_NUMBER = ASCII(@TRIAL_CHARACTER) - @I

        IF (@TRIAL_NUMBER % 2) = 0
           SET @TRIAL_NUMBER = @TRIAL_NUMBER + 6
        /*-IE EVEN*/
        ELSE 
           SET @TRIAL_NUMBER = @TRIAL_NUMBER + 8
        /*-IE ODD*/

        SET @DECRYPTED_PASSWORD = ISNULL(@DECRYPTED_PASSWORD,'') + ISNULL(CHAR(CAST(@TRIAL_NUMBER AS INT)), '')

        SET @I = @I + 1

     END

  RETURN @DECRYPTED_PASSWORD

END`

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Encryption & Decryption examples can be found here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms179331.aspx

Hashing example can be found here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms174415.aspx

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