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I've got the following task:

Compute x/(2^n), for 0 <= n <= 30 using bit shifting.

Requirement: Round toward zero.

Examples:

divpwr2(15,1) = 7
divpwr2(-33,4) = -2

Legal operators: ! ~ & ^ | + << >>

Maximum number of operators: 15

Here is what I've got so far:

public int DivideByPowerOf2(int x, int n)
{
    //TODO: find out why DivideByPowerOf2(-33,4) = -3 instead of -2
    return x >> n;
}

DivideByPowerOf2(15,1) = 7 is ok.

But DivideByPowerOf2(-33,4) = -3 instead of -2. Why?

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4  
Smells like homework ... –  Јοеу Feb 21 '11 at 0:12
1  
You will be interested to note that 33 >> 4 = 2. So, the question is, what does the >> operator do with negative numbers? –  Noon Silk Feb 21 '11 at 0:14
6  
@Joey perhaps it is. He's not asking us to do his homework for him - he's asking us why is his function not doing what he expects. –  corsiKa Feb 21 '11 at 0:14
    
Hint: Which bit is the sign bit, and what happens to it when you shift? –  David R Tribble Feb 21 '11 at 0:15
    
@glow: It still was very poorly asked. Changed by now, though. –  Јοеу Feb 21 '11 at 0:46
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3 Answers

Pay close attention to the rounding behavior.

  • / (integer divide) always rounds toward zero.
  • What does bit shifting do?
  • How can you compensate for this difference?
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thanks for the help –  Sotelo Feb 21 '11 at 1:10
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Negative numbers work out to be one off in the binary representation due to their two's complement representation. Perhaps reading about two's complement will help.

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thanks, that did help –  Sotelo Feb 21 '11 at 1:10
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up vote 4 down vote accepted
public int DivideByPowerOf2(int x, int n)
    {

        return (x + ((x >> 31) & ((1 << n) + ~0))) >> n;
    }
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1  
Doesn't explain why the C# shift is giving the wrong answer? –  aserwin Oct 18 '12 at 19:26
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