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I am trying to use decltype inside a template class as follows:

#include <functional>
template <typename T>
class A
{
    typedef decltype(std::bind(&A::f, std::declval<A>())) some_type;

    void f();
};

That works fine, but now I'd like to add an explicit specialization:

template <>
class A<void>
{
    typedef decltype(std::bind(&A::f, std::declval<A>())) some_type;

    void f();
};

This time g++ gives an error:

test.cpp:14:33: error: incomplete type 'A<void>' used in nested name specifier

What am I doing wrong? I am using gcc 4.5.

EDIT: If I move the declaration of void f(); to above the typedef, as suggested by Johannes, I get (slightly) different errors:

test.cpp:15:62: error: invalid use of incomplete type 'class A<void>'
test.cpp:13:1: error: declaration of 'class A<void>'
test.cpp:15:62: error:   initializing argument 2 of 'std::_Bind<typename std::_Maybe_wrap_member_pointer<_Tp>::type(_ArgTypes ...)> std::bind(_Functor, _ArgTypes ...) [with _Functor = void (A<void>::*)(), _ArgTypes = {A<void>}, typename std::_Maybe_wrap_member_pointer<_Tp>::type = std::_Mem_fn<void (A<void>::*)()>]'
test.cpp:15:62: error: invalid use of incomplete type 'class A<void>'
test.cpp:13:1: error: declaration of 'class A<void>'
test.cpp:15:62: error:   initializing argument 2 of 'std::_Bind<typename std::_Maybe_wrap_member_pointer<_Tp>::type(_ArgTypes ...)> std::bind(_Functor, _ArgTypes ...) [with _Functor = void (A<void>::*)(), _ArgTypes = {A<void>}, typename std::_Maybe_wrap_member_pointer<_Tp>::type = std::_Mem_fn<void (A<void>::*)()>]'
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2  
"A Void" is an incomplete typography, lacking as it does the letter "e". (Too obscure? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Void) –  Steve Jessop Feb 21 '11 at 2:42
    
@Steve LOL... if only humour made code compile... –  HighCommander4 Feb 21 '11 at 2:47
    
yes, sorry I can't actually help with the question. –  Steve Jessop Feb 21 '11 at 2:52
1  
Here is another code showing the same issue, this time with no templates at all, hope it will help: ideone.com/iTyPg –  Suma Feb 21 '11 at 10:03
    
You may already have won a g++ bug! Clang accepts your code, once the declaration order is fixed. –  Richard Smith May 13 '12 at 23:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your order is wrong. Try exchanging it

template <>
class A<void>
{    
    void f();
    typedef decltype(std::bind(&A::f, std::declval<A>())) some_type;
};

In the primary template, the name A::f was dependent and the compiler delayed lookup to a point where f was declared (A::f is not really dependent in C++0x anymore, since A refers to the current instantiation and therefor f to a member of the current instantiation, but as there is a loophole in the current specification (it has to do with dependent base classes), the compiler delayed the lookup nontheless). In the explicit specialization, the name is not dependent and lookup is done immediately, which is the reason you need to declare f before referring to it.

Edit: You are wrongly using std::bind. The second argument you give is of type A<void>, which will be copied/moved by std::bind into its created call wrapper object. This requires a complete type A<void>.

If you want to merely pass a reference to A on which the member function is called, you can pass a declval<A*>(), which the std::bind mechanism equally detects as magical first argument to a member pointer invocation.

But it seems to me you want to look into std::function<>, instead of doing this std::bind and decltype mess. After all you have a powerful toolset given, but by using this doubtful decltype expression, you throw away all the genericity the Standard library gives you and restrict yourself to use of that single std::bind expression. That's no good.

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Does not seem to help: ideone.com/IaKNM –  Suma Feb 21 '11 at 9:17
    
That doesn't solve the problem, but the errors do become slightly different (see edit to question) –  HighCommander4 Feb 21 '11 at 9:37
1  
OK. I think I get it know. Johannes is correct, and after solving this issue another issue is revealed. My experiment with VS 2010 does not show this problem, probably because VS does not implement two phase lookup, therefore only the second problem is shown. –  Suma Feb 21 '11 at 9:39
1  
As for std::function<>, my understanding is that it comes at a cost of a virtual function call per invocation. I'd like to avoid that. –  HighCommander4 Feb 21 '11 at 18:48
1  
@HighCommander4 within member functions, default arguments and the constructor initializer list, the class is regarded as complete, so that you can access all its members and create objects of its type inside them. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 21 '11 at 20:43

std::bind requires A as a complete type (see answer by Johannes) and therefore you cannot use it at this point. As a workaround, if you encapsulate the some_type this will compile:

#include <functional>

template <typename T>
class A
{
  void f();
  struct some_type_helper
  {
    typedef decltype(std::bind(&A::f, std::declval<A>())) some_type;
  };
};

template <>
class A<void>
{
  void f();
  struct some_type_helper;
};

struct A<void>::some_type_helper
{
  typedef decltype(std::bind(&A::f, std::declval<A>())) some_type;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Nice workaround –  HighCommander4 Feb 21 '11 at 19:06
    
Yes, such encapsulation can be useful sometimes. Still, in this case I think using std::declval<A *> as Johannes suggested is easier and works nice as well. –  Suma Feb 22 '11 at 9:10

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