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Are regular iterator blocks (i.e. "yield return") incompatible with "async" and "await"?

This gives a good idea of what I'm trying to do:

async Task<IEnumerable<Foo>> Method(String [] Strs)
{
    // I want to compose the single result to the final result, so I use the SelectMany
    var finalResult = UrlStrings.SelectMany(link =>   //i have an Urlstring Collection 
                   await UrlString.DownLoadHtmlAsync()  //download single result; DownLoadHtmlAsync method will Download the url's html code 
              );
     return finalResult;
}

However, I get a compiler error citing "unable to load message string from resources".

Here is another attempt:

async Task<IEnumerable<Foo>> Method(String [] Strs)
{
    foreach(var str in strs)
    {
        yield return await DoSomethingAsync( str)
    }
}

But again, the compiler returns an error: "unable to load message string from resources".


Here is the real programming code in my project

This is very useful when I have an List Task,that task can be download HTML from a URL and I use the syntax "yield return await task", the result is I want IEnumerable<Foo>. I don't want write this code:

async Task<IEnumerable<String>> DownLoadAllURL(String [] Strs)
{
    List<Foo> htmls= new ...
    foreach(var str in strs)
    {
        var html= await DownLoadHtmlAsync( str)
        htmls.Add(item)
    }
    return htmls;
}

But it seems that I have to.

Thanks for any help.

share|improve this question
3  
This question isn't particularly clear, you should elaborate on what it is exactly that you wish to do - its difficult to determine what it is you wish to do from just a code sample alone. –  Justin Feb 21 '11 at 2:46
    
hi how about this my question is clear now –  jiangzhen Feb 21 '11 at 3:25
    
@jiangzhen: no, it's still quite unclear –  John Saunders Feb 21 '11 at 4:48
    
@John Saunders how about now? –  jiangzhen Feb 21 '11 at 5:13
1  
The Ix_Experimental-Async NuGet package includes "asynchronous enumerators" complete with LINQ support. They use the IAsyncEnumerator<T> type as defined by Arne. –  Stephen Cleary Aug 30 '11 at 14:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 18 down vote accepted

What you are describing can be accomplished with the Task.WhenAll method. Notice how the code turns into a simple one-liner. What happens is that each individual url begins downloading and then WhenAll is used combine those operations into a single Task which can be awaited.

Task<IEnumerable<string>> DownLoadAllUrls(string[] urls)
{
    // Note that Task.WhenAll is TaskEx.WhenAll in the CTP.
    return Task.WhenAll(from url in urls select DownloadHtmlAsync(url));
}
share|improve this answer
1  
async/await are not needed in this case. Just remove async from the method and do return Task.WhenAll directly. –  luiscubal Oct 27 '13 at 20:43
    
@luiscubal: Yep, fixed. –  Brian Gideon Oct 27 '13 at 23:53

tl;dr Iterators as implemented with yield are a blocking construct, so as of right now await and yield are incompatible.

Long Because iterating over an IEnumerable is a blocking operation, calling a method marked as async will still execute it in a blocking manner, since it has to wait for that operation to finish.

async Task<IEnumerable<Foo>> Method(String [] Strs)
{
  foreach(var str in strs)
  {
    yield return await DoSomethingAsync( str)
  }
}  

The awaiting Method mixes meanings. Do you want to wait until the Task has an IEnumerable and then block on iterating over it? Or are you trying to await each value of the IEnumerable?

I assume the second is the desired behavior and in that case the existing Iterator semantics will not work. The IEnumerator<T> interface is basically

public interface IEnumererator<T>
  T Current;
  bool MoveNext();
}

I'm ignoring Reset() since it makes no sense for a sequence of asynchronous results. But what you would need is something like this:

public interface IAsyncEnumerator<T>
  T Current;
  Task<bool> MoveNext();
}

Of course, foreach also won't work with this and you'd have to iterate manually like this:

var moveNext = await asyncEnumerator.MoveNext();
while(moveNext) {

  // get the value that was fetche asynchronously
  var v = asyncEnumerator.Current;

  // do something with that value

  // suspend current execution context until next value arrives or we are done
  moveNext = await asyncEnumerator.MoveNext();
}
share|improve this answer

First of all, keep in mind that the Async stuff is not finished. The C# team still has a long way to go before C# 5 is released.

That being said, I think you may want to gather the tasks that are being fired off in the DownloadAllHtml function in a different way.

For example, you can use something like this:

IEnumerable<Task<string>> DownloadAllUrl(string[] urls)
{
    foreach(var url in urls)
    {
        yield return DownloadHtmlAsync(url);
    }
}

async Task<string> DownloadHtmlAsync(url)
{
    // Do your downloading here...
}

Not that the DownloadAllUrl function is NOT an async call. But, you can have the async call implemented on another function (i.e. DownloadHtmlAsync).

The Task Parallel Library has the .ContinueWhenAny and .ContinueWhenAll functions.

That can be used like this:

var tasks = DownloadAllUrl(...);
var tasksArray = tasks.ToArray();
var continuation = Task.Factory.ContinueWhenAll(tasksArray, completedTasks =>
{
    completedtask
});
continuation.RunSynchronously();
share|improve this answer
    
You can also have a 'header' (before the loop) if you define your method as async Task<IEnumerable<Task<string>>> DownloadAllUrl. Or, if you want 'footer' actions IEnumerable<Task>. E.g. gist.github.com/1184435 –  Jonathan Dickinson Aug 31 '11 at 19:14
    
Now that the async stuff is finished and C# 5.0 is released, this can be updated. –  casperOne Dec 5 '12 at 4:23

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