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First of all, I'm assuming this is too complex for CSS3, but if there's a solution in there somewhere, I'd love to go with that instead.

The html is pretty straightforward.

<div class="parent">
    <div class="child">
        Text Block 1
    </div>
</div>

<div class="parent">
    <div class="child">
        Text Block 2
    </div>
</div>

The child div is set to display:none; by default, but then changes to display:block; when the mouse is hovered over the parent div. The problem is that this markup appears in several places on my site, and I only want the child to be displayed if the mouse is over it's parent, and not if the mouse is over any of the other parents (they all have the same class name and no IDs).

I've tried using $(this) and .children() to no avail. Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

$('.parent').hover(function(){
            $(this).children('.child').css("display","block");
        }, function() {
            $(this).children('.child').css("display","none");
        });
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6 Answers 6

up vote 80 down vote accepted

Why not just use CSS?

.parent:hover .child, .parent.hover .child { display: block; }

and then add JS for IE6 (inside a conditional comment for instance) which doesn't support :hover properly:

jQuery('.parent').hover(function () {
    jQuery(this).addClass('hover');
}, function () {
    jQuery(this).removeClass('hover');
});

Here's a quick example: Fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
that code isn't working for me. is it supposed to say ".parent.hover" and not ".parent:hover"?? case i've never seen what you have before. and doesn't a comma indicate multiple selectors taking the same styles? i don't see how that helps here. a little more info on that CSS, por favor 0=] –  Hartley Brody Feb 21 '11 at 3:36
2  
:hover is one of the "Dynamic pseudo-classes" defined by CSS2 (here's the spec). Here's a quick example: http://jsfiddle.net/5FLr4/. it works for me. –  Lee Feb 21 '11 at 4:32
    
ahh thanks so much! i actually had some relative positioning that was pushing the child text out of view... doh! >.< i appreciate the help! –  Hartley Brody Feb 21 '11 at 5:18
    
Apparently this won't work for .child::-webkit-scrollbar-thumb if you want to change the highlight of the scrollbar inside the child element. –  10basetom Oct 18 '12 at 3:03

No need to use the JavaScript or jquery, CSS is enough:

.child{ display:none; }
.parent:hover .child{ display:block; }
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1  
+1 Great answer!! Just what the doctor ordered. –  PeterKA Oct 2 at 4:31

I have what i think is a better solution, since it is scalable to more levels, as many as wanted, not only two or three.

I use borders, but it can also be done with whateever style wanted, like background-color.

With the border, the idea is to:

  • Have a different border color only one div, the div over where the mouse is, not on any parent, not on any child, so it can be seen only such div border in a different color while the rest stays on white.

You can test it at: http://jsbin.com/ubiyo3/13

And here is the code:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<meta charset=utf-8 />
<title>Hierarchie Borders MarkUp</title>
<style>

  .parent { display: block; position: relative; z-index: 0;
            height: auto; width: auto; padding: 25px;
          }

  .parent-bg { display: block; height: 100%; width: 100%; 
               position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 0px; 
               border: 1px solid white; z-index: 0; 
             }
  .parent-bg:hover { border: 1px solid red; }

  .child { display: block; position: relative; z-index: 1; 
           height: auto; width: auto; padding: 25px;
         }

  .child-bg { display: block; height: 100%; width: 100%; 
              position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 0px; 
              border: 1px solid white; z-index: 0; 
            }
  .child-bg:hover { border: 1px solid red; }

  .grandson { display: block; position: relative; z-index: 2; 
              height: auto; width: auto; padding: 25px;
            }

  .grandson-bg { display: block; height: 100%; width: 100%; 
                 position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 0px; 
                 border: 1px solid white; z-index: 0; 
               }
  .grandson-bg:hover { border: 1px solid red; }

</style>
</head>
<body>
  <div class="parent">
    Parent
    <div class="child">
      Child
      <div class="grandson">
        Grandson
        <div class="grandson-bg"></div>
      </div>
      <div class="child-bg"></div>
    </div>
    <div class="parent-bg"></div>
  </div>
</body>
</html>
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Use toggleClass().

$('.parent').hover(function(){
$(this).find('.child').toggleClass('color')
});

where color is the class. You can style the class as you like to achieve the behavior you want. The example demonstrates how class is added and removed upon mouse in and out.

Check Working example here.

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Stephen's answer is correct but here's my adaptation of his answer:

HTML

<div class="parent">
    <p> parent 1 </p>
    <div class="child">
        Text Block 1
    </div>
</div>

<div class="parent">
    <p> parent 2 </p>
    <div class="child">
        Text Block 2
    </div>
</div>

CSS

.parent { width: 100px; min-height: 100px; color: red; }
.child { width: 50px; min-height: 20px; color: blue; display: none; }
.parent:hover .child, .parent.hover .child { display: block; }

jQuery

//this is only necessary for IE and should be in a conditional comment

jQuery('.parent').hover(function () {
    jQuery(this).addClass('hover');
}, function () {
    jQuery(this).removeClass('hover');
});

You can see this example working over at jsFiddle.

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If you're using Twitter Bootstrap styling and base JS for a drop down menu:

.child{ display:none; }
.parent:hover .child{ display:block; }

This is the missing piece to create sticky-dropdowns (that aren't annoying)

  • The behavior is to:
    1. Stay open when clicked, close when clicking again anywhere else on the page
    2. Close automatically when the mouse scrolls out of the menu's elements.
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