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I've having trouble understanding what is the point of Symbolic Constants in C, I am sure there is a reason for them but I can't seem to see why you wouldn't just use a variable.

#include <stdio.h>

main()
{
    float fahr, celsius;
    float lower, upper, step;

    lower = 0;
    upper = 300;
    step = 20;

    printf("%s\t %s\n", "Fahrenheit", "Celsius");
    fahr = lower;   
    while (fahr <= upper) {
        celsius = (5.0 / 9.0) * (fahr - 32.0);
        printf("%3.0f\t\t %3.2f\n", fahr, celsius);
        fahr = fahr + step;
    }

}

Vs.

#include <stdio.h>

#define LOWER   0
#define UPPER   300
#define STEP    20

main()
{
    float fahr, celsius;

    printf("%s\t %s\n", "Fahrenheit", "Celsius");
    fahr = LOWER;   
    while (fahr <= UPPER) {
        celsius = (5.0 / 9.0) * (fahr - 32.0);
        printf("%3.0f\t\t %3.2f\n", fahr, celsius);
        fahr = fahr + STEP;
    }

}
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4 Answers 4

The (pre)compiler knows that symbolic constants won't change. It substitutes the value for the constant at compile time. If the "constant" is in a variable, it usually can't figure out that the variable will never change value. In consequence, the compiled code has to read the value from the memory allocated to the variable, which can make the program slightly slower and larger.

In C++, you can declare a variable to be const, which tells the compiler pretty much the same thing. This is why symbolic constants are frowned upon in C++.

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+1 This is what I was trying to say :) –  alex Feb 21 '11 at 3:49
2  
So #define in C is much like const in C++? Am I right in thinking it is also much like final in Java? –  Peter Feb 21 '11 at 3:53
1  
#define foo 3 would literally take any instance of foo in your code, and then replace it with 3. It would then pass that preprocessed code to the compiler. Therefore, it's a bit more forceful than final in java, because the compiler never really sees a symbol, it just sees the value. –  Bill Lynch Feb 21 '11 at 4:20
    
const should work in C with most compilers. I think it was first added in C89 and also included in C99 and C11, which most major C compilers implement. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ANSI_C#Compilers_supporting_ANSI_C –  David Winiecki Oct 28 '14 at 4:06

One good example of why named constants are beneficial comes from the excellent book The Practice of Programming by Kernighan and Pike.

§1.5 Magic Numbers

[...] This excerpt from a program to print a histogram of letter frequencies on a 24 by 80 cursor-addressed terminal is needlessly opaque because of a host of magic numbers:

...
fac = lim / 20;
if (fac < 1)
    fac = 1;
for (i = 0, col = 0; i < 27; i++, j++) {
    col += 3;
    k = 21 - (let[i] / fac);
    star = (let[i] == 0) ? ' ' : '*';
    for (j = k; j < 22; j++)
        draw(j, col, star);
}
draw(23, 2, ' ');
for (i = 'A'; i <= 'Z'; i++)
    printf("%c  ", i);

The code includes, among others, the numbers 20, 21, 22, 23, and 27. They're clearly related...or are they? In fact, there are only three numbers critical to this program: 24, the number of rows on the screen; 80, the number of columns; and 26, the number of letters in the alphabet. But none of these appears in the code, which makes the numbers that do even more magical.

By giving names to the principal numbers in the calculation, we can make the code easier to follow. We discover, for instance, that the number 3 comes from (80 - 1)/26 and that let should have 26 entries, not 27 (an off-by-one error perhaps caused by 1-indexed screen coordinates). Making a couple of other simplifications, this is the result:

enum {
    MINROW   = 1,                 /* top row */
    MINCOL   = 1,                 /* left edge */
    MAXROW   = 24,                /* bottom edge (<=) */
    MAXCOL   = 80,                /* right edge (<=) */
    LABELROW = 1,                 /* position of labels */
    NLET     = 26,                /* size of alphabet */
    HEIGHT   = (MAXROW - 4),      /* height of bars */
    WIDTH    = (MAXCOL - 1)/NLET  /* width of bars */
};

    ...     
    fac = (lim + HEIGHT - 1) / HEIGHT;
    if (fac < 1)
        fac = 1;
    for (i = 0; i < NLET; i++) {
        if (let[i] == 0)
            continue;
        for (j = HEIGHT - let[i]/fac; j < HEIGHT; j++)
            draw(j+1 + LABELROW, (i+1)*WIDTH, '*');
    }
    draw(MAXROW-1, MINCOL+1, ' ');
    for (i = 'A'; i <= 'Z'; i++)
        printf("%c  ", i);

Now it's clearer what the main loop does; it's an idiomatic loop from 0 to NLET, indicating that the loop is over the elements of the data. Also the calls to draw are easier to understand because words like MAXROW and MINCOL remind us of the order of arguments. Most important, it's now feasible to adapt the program to another size of display or different data. The numbers are demystified and so is the code.

The revised code doesn't actually use MINROW, which is interesting; one wonders which of the residual 1's should be MINROW.

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1  
+1 for an excellent example of why one should name constants and not scatter them through the code. However, the same benefit can be obtained by declaring variables with those values. The benefit of symbolic constants (or enum constants) over named variables isn't so clear from this. (Actually, I don't like using enum in situations like this where there is no clear class of items being enumerated [aside from "useful constants"].) –  Ted Hopp Feb 21 '11 at 4:38
    
@Ted: It depends on the context. The example is for a fixed 24x80 screen; constants are appropriate. If you take into account current window size, named variables appropriately initialized are clearly better. The OP's code would be most clarified by using a for (fahr = LOWER; fahr <= UPPER; fahr += STEP) loop, where I'm neutral about the relative merits of named constants vs pure numbers. In the example, the values for lower, upper and step are more nearly arbitrary. If the values were FREEZING_POINT, BOILING_POINT and (BOILING_POINT - FREEZING_POINT) / 30, then names are better. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 21 '11 at 5:51
    
I agree completely about using names instead of the raw numbers. I just don't like using enum instead of #define in this particular example. The benefits of using constants (#define and/or enum) instead of variables become much clearer in examples where the compiler can do things like eliminate a series of calculations in an inner loop because it recognizes an expression a compile-time constant. This example doesn't really demonstrate that kind of benefit. (I'm surprised nobody's yet mentioned how useful symbolic constants are for switch statements. Now I have! :)) –  Ted Hopp Feb 21 '11 at 7:51
    
@Ted: I like to use enum rather than #define when I can because the debugger gets to know about enum values, so you can ask it to print HEIGHT (for example), but if you use #define, the name HEIGHT is simply not known. OTOH, you can't do #ifdef on an enum. Your point about switches and case labels is valid. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 21 '11 at 14:00

Variables are scoped locally to the structure they're declared in. Of course you could use variables instead of symbolic constants, but that might take a lot of work. Consider an application that frequently uses radians. The symbolic constant #define TWO_PI 6.28 would be of high value to the programmer.

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Jonathan made a good point in why you would want to use symbolic constants in C (and in any other programming language, BTW).

Syntactically, in C this is different from C++ and many other languages because it is much restrictive on how you may declare such symbolic constant. So-called const qualified variables don't account for this as they would in C++.

  • You may use a macro that is defined to any constant expression: integer or floating point constants, address expressions of static variables, and some forms of expression that you form from them. These are only treated by the preprocessing phase of the compiler and you'd have to be careful when you use complicated expressions in them.
  • Yo may declare integer constant expressions in form of integer enumeration constants such as in enum color { red = 0xFF00, green = 0x00FF00, blue = 0x0000FF };. They are only of some restricted use, because they are fixed to have type int. So you wouldn't cover all ranges of values that you'd might want with them.
  • You might also see integer character constants like 'a' or L'\x4567' as predefined symbolic constants, if you like. They translate an abstract concept (the character value "a") into the encoding of the executing platform (ASCII, EBDIC, whatever).
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