Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a base class that takes a single generic argument. I then have several classes that inherit from this base class. Is there a simple way for the child classes to inherent a factory from the base class?

Example

class BaseClass<T>
{
     T Value {get; set;}
     string Name {get; set;}

     public static BaseClass<T> Factory(T Value)
     {
        return new BaseClass<T>(Value); 
     }
}

class ChildClass : BaseClass<int>
{
     public void Test()
     {
         // I want this below to work
         // but Factory() returns a BaseClass
         ChildClass bs = ChildClass.Factory(10);
     }
}

I've noted in the code what I want to work. I can think of one way to overcome this, by adding an implicit operator to either BaseClass or SubClass that converts from BaseClass to ChildClass.

I can also just explicitly add the Factory to ChildClass but that defeats the point of inheritance.

Is there a better, more standardized way of doing this?

share|improve this question
    
Why not just type-cast inside of Test()? –  Alastair Pitts Feb 21 '11 at 5:11
1  
I don't want the classes to require casting for functionality. If I'm going to do casting, I'm going to make it an implicit cast. –  Mike Feb 21 '11 at 5:12
4  
Is Factory() supposed to be static? –  Mark Cidade Feb 21 '11 at 5:13
    
@Mark: Probably. Yes. I don't really care though, I don't want it to impede a more nuanced answer. –  Mike Feb 21 '11 at 5:27
    
Your Factory method is declared as an instance method, but is used as though it were a static method. –  Ani Feb 21 '11 at 5:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I would do something like this:

class BaseClass<T, K> where K : BaseClass<T, K>, new()
{
    T Value { get; set; }
    string Name { get; set; }

    public static K Factory(T value)
    {
        return new K { Value = value };
    }
}

class ChildClass : BaseClass<int, ChildClass>
{
    public void Test()
    {
        ChildClass cs = Factory(10);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It wouldn't compile because the compiler cannot infer ChildClass, not to mention you didn't specify BaseClass. In your code, it should be BaseClass<int, ChildClass>.Factory(10) –  Kobi Feb 21 '11 at 5:49
1  
@Kobi: It does compile. I do this kind of thing all the time in generic inheritance hierarchies. –  siride Feb 21 '11 at 5:57
    
@siride - You're right, I missed the part Factory is inherited. Oops (weird, I do remember testing it :P). It does change the class signature though... Seems to work very nicely though, if you call ChildClass.Factory(1), so maybe it doesn't matter. –  Kobi Feb 21 '11 at 6:05
    
This is magical. I don't care that it changes the signature. I'll mark this as answered tomorrow, I'm curious if there are any other ways of doing this. –  Mike Feb 21 '11 at 6:06
    
@Mike: it's a kind of CRTP (Curiously Recurring Template Pattern). The base class does all the work and the type information is passed along via inheritance from more specific child classes. Eric Lippert is against it, but I disagree with his stance and reasoning. –  siride Feb 21 '11 at 6:32

It's a bit hard to answer your question since you have described what you are trying to do, but not why. Hence I got to try to guess what you want.

I would not put the factory method in the same class as in the other answer or your question. How would you handle inheritance for once? It works for the two levels that you have. But what if you want to extend ChildClass?

Instead I would create a generic factory used for the object creation. Implement it has a singleton wrapped around a factory interface to be able to easy extend it or swap the implementation.

class MyFactory
{
    private static IMyFactory _instance;
    public static void Assign(IMyFactory factory) { _instance = factory; }
    public static T Create<T>() { return _instance.Create<T>(); }
}

interface IMyFactory
{
    T Create<T>();
}
class MyFactoryImp : IMyFactory
{
    //do whatever needed in here
    public T Create<T>(){ return new T(); }
}


class BaseClass<T>
{
     T Value {get; set;}
     string Name {get; set;}
}

class ChildClass : BaseClass<int>
{
     public void Test()
     {
         ChildClass bs = MyFactory.Create<ChildClass>(10);
     }
}

// start with this, you can easily switch implementation
MyFactory.Assign(new MyFactoryImp());

The other obvious answer would be to start using a Inversion Of Control container, for example autofac.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.