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I am on AIX system. But grep on AIX does not support -B, -A, -M on AIX system. Are there other solutions like awk or sed which can do the same job?

For example:

str1
str2
str3
str4
str9
str8
str1
str3
str2

I try to run grep str3 -m 1 -B 1 -A 1 to get:

str2
str3
str4

but it does not work on AIX. Is there any solution for sed or awk?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted
 awk 'c&&c--;/str3/{print p;print $0;c=1}{p=$0}' file
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thx! Could you please explain the command a little bit. which parameter is set up for line number before the matching like -B in grep. which one is set up for line number after the matching like -A in grep –  EeE Feb 21 '11 at 6:43
    
use c to set up after the line. (you can use any number for c). use p for before the line. However, for this I only give you answer for the equivalent of -A 1. Have to do it another way if you want to specify the number. –  kurumi Feb 21 '11 at 6:58

You can use a circular buffer which you print when the match is found, followed by the matched line, followed by the additional lines.

#!/usr/bin/awk -f
BEGIN {
    B = 4              # set these values like you would use for grep -B, -A, -m
    A = 2
    m = 3

    patt = "999"       # set this to your regex

    i = 0
    B++                # the buffer will hold B lines plus one for the match
}

{
    a[i] = $0          # accumulate B (+1) lines in a circular buffer
    i = (i + 1) % B
}

$0 ~ patt {            # if the pattern is found print the contents of the buffer
    for (j=1; j<=B; j++) {
        print a[i]
        i = (i + 1) % B
    }
    split("", a)
    for (i=1; i<=A; i++) {    # print the next A lines
        getline
        print
    }
    if (--m == 0) exit        # output m matches then quit
    print "---"
}

A more sophisticated script would accept options and arguments rather than having to edit it to change them.

As a compromise, you could rearrange things a little and pass arguments using AWK's -v option.

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By the way, congratulations and +1 for providing sample input and output. You would be surprised how many questions are missing such obvious specifications...

This can be done with ed(1).

so ross$ cat >> cg.ed
/str3/-1;.+2p
so ross$ ed - cg.txt < cg.ed
str2
str3
str4
so ross$ 

You can make a script out of this that will take the filename and pattern as arguments:

so ross$ cat > cg.sh
#!/bin/sh
ed - $1 << eof
/$2/-1;.+2p
eof
so ross$ sh cg.sh cg.txt str3
str2
str3
str4
so ross$ 
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thank you for ur reply. i never use ed command before. i will try that. How about awk or sed? –  EeE Feb 21 '11 at 6:33
    
can you please elaborate how the above script works. –  user1292831 May 3 '12 at 7:25

I have a 78-line shell script that does the job. I later replaced it with a 114-line Perl script, but normally port GNU grep where I need the facility. The shell script follows - it uses a different nomenclature for the options (AFAIK, it predates the options on GNU grep; it was certainly developed independently of the options in GNU grep).

#!/bin/ksh
#
# @(#)$Id: old.sgrep.sh,v 1.5 2007/09/15 22:15:43 jleffler Exp $
#
#   Special grep
#   Finds a pattern and prints lines either side of the pattern
#   Line numbers are always produced by ed (substitute for grep),
#   which allows us to eliminate duplicate lines cleanly.  If the
#   user did not ask for numbers, these are then stripped out.
#
#   BUG: if the pattern occurs in in the first line or two and
#   the number of lines to go back is larger than the line number,
#   it fails dismally.

set -- `getopt "f:b:hn" "$@"`

case $# in
0)  echo "Usage: $0 [-hn] [-f x] [-b y] pattern [files]" >&2
    exit 1;;
esac

# Tab required - at least with sed (perl would be different)
# But then the whole problem would be different if implemented in Perl.
number="'s/^\\([0-9][0-9]*\\)   /\\1:/'"
filename="'s%^%%'"      # No-op for sed

f=3
b=3
nflag=no
hflag=no
while [ $# -gt 0 ]
do
    case $1 in
    -f) f=$2; shift 2;;
    -b) b=$2; shift 2;;
    -n) nflag=yes; shift;;
    -h) hflag=yes; shift;;
    --) shift; break;;
    *)  echo "Unknown option $1" >&2
        exit 1;;
    esac
done
pattern="${1:?'No pattern'}"
shift

case $# in
0)  tmp=${TMPDIR:-/tmp}/`basename $0`.$$
    trap "rm -f $tmp ; exit 1" 0
    cat - >$tmp
    set -- $tmp
    sort="sort -t: -u +0n -1"
    ;;
*)  filename="'s%^%'\$file:%"
    sort="sort -t: -u +1n -2"
    ;;
esac

case $nflag in
yes)    num_remove='s/[0-9][0-9]*://';;
no)     num_remove='s/^//';;
esac
case $hflag in
yes)    fileremove='s%^$file:%%';;
no)     fileremove='s/^//';;
esac

for file in $*
do
    echo "g/$pattern/.-${b},.+${f}n" |
    ed - $file |
    eval sed -e "$number" -e "$filename" |
    $sort |
    eval sed -e "$fileremove" -e "$num_remove"
done

rm -f $tmp
trap 0
exit 0
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this little coding will highlight the regexp and works like grep -A -B -m Hope this helps.

Christian Knauer

#!/bin/bash
[ $# -lt 2 ] && printf "usage: %s <regex> <file> [[[back]forward]occurrence] \n" "$0" && exit 0
REGEX=$1
FILE=$2
BACK=${3:-1}
FORWARD=${4:-1}
STOP=${5:-1000000000}
awk -v bold=$'\e[1m' -v norm=$'\e[0m' -v back=$BACK -v forward=$FORWARD -v stop=$STOP 'BEGIN {cnt=0} { array[i++]=$0 }
     END {
       maxI=++i
       for (j=0;j<maxI; j++) {
         if (array[j] ~ /'"${REGEX}"'/) {
           for (z=back;z>0; z--) {
             print array[j-z]
           }
           printf bold > "/dev/stderr"
           printf("%s\n", array[j])
           printf norm > "/dev/stderr"
           for (x=1;x<=forward; x++) {
             print array[j+x]
           }
           cnt++
           if (cnt == stop) {
             break
           }
         }
       }
     }
   ' "$FILE"
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You could use the ksh script that I wrote for AIX some time back. The script uses egrep, awk and shell scripting to achieve the desired results as would be got by using -A, -B or -C option of GNU grep.

Details are posted in the below link.

http://www.sangeek.com/day2dayunix/2013/07/ksh-script-to-print-lines-beforeafter-grep/

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