Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using Racket contract system, and I want to export a function of no arguments, which returns a lambda expression with no arguments, e. g.:

#lang racket
(define (foo)
  (do-somthing)
  (lambda ()
    (do-other things)))

Does anyone know how to write contract for this kind of function?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I suspect it would look something along the lines of:

#lang racket/load

(module m racket
  (provide/contract [foo (-> (-> any/c))])
  (define (foo)
    (+ 10 3) ; do something
    (lambda ()
      (+ 40 2) ; do other things
      )))

(module n racket
  (require 'm)
  ((foo)))

(require 'n)

(-> (-> any/c)) is a contract that matches functions that returns another function, which, when evaluated, returns a single integer value.

But if you'd like to relax return values of foo, you'd use just any instead of any/c, which allows any number of return values, not just a single value. Consider:

(module m racket
  (provide/contract [foo (-> (-> any))])
  (define (foo)
    (+ 10 3) ; do something
    (lambda ()
      (values (+ 40 2) 666); do other things
      )))

See Contracts on Higher-order Functions in Racket documentation.

share|improve this answer
    
Oops, to be precise, the contract in the first example should've been written like (-> (-> integer?)) to match a function without arguments, which in turn returns another function without arguments before finally returning an integer. The contract any/c, in contrast, accepts any single value, including integer?; for instance, symbol?, list? etc. –  Yasir Arsanukaev Feb 21 '11 at 8:04
    
Note that one possible problem of any/c is that it introduces a wrapper layer and some cost, whereas any does not. –  Eli Barzilay Feb 21 '11 at 8:18
    
Thanks for the reply! It works, I used the (-> (-> any)). Then I am starting to suspect, 1. The contract like above, it doesn't say much about the function, especially using "any" ? 2. I may be wrong, but currently, using the contracts is like explicitly imposing type info on functions, data structures and then the contract system checks violation in runtime. However, recall the imperative programming language, like C, those information need to be specified when you write code, and compiler can check it in compile time, which I think it is more efficient than FP, like Racket..... –  user618815 Feb 21 '11 at 18:31
1  
@freezdom: It's not only about type, it's also about a value. Consider, for example, a predicate positive?; a contract (-> positive?) would check that function returns positive values. In C, you would check this explicitly using conditions if .. then .. else. Though there are tools and libraries for C to use contracts. –  Yasir Arsanukaev Feb 21 '11 at 18:51
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.