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random.Next(0,5)

It never returns the 5 (but sometimes returns the 0.) Why? I thought these are just boundary values that can be returned. Thanks

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1  
If you are using Visual studio, you should start READING the little window with the description of the parameters... like this: "The exclusive upper bound of the random number returned. maxValue must be greater than or equal to minValue." – xanatos Feb 21 '11 at 7:39
    
Why was it done this way? It's needlessly confusing. – user660871 Mar 15 '11 at 15:27
    
Why? Probably because of this: var randomValue = myArray[rand.Next(0, myArray.Length)]; – Brett Allen Sep 27 '12 at 14:24
8  
I found this documentation faster than retyping code and triggering intellisense or searching the MSDN library. You don't usually type code when debugging or reading code. I intuitively read "maxValue" as "maximum possible value", not "maximum value minus one". No need to have told the OP to RTFM. – JonH Apr 24 '14 at 20:37
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I know I'm late here but I'm actually completely flabbergasted by this. Like everyone else in the world, I read "maxValue" as the largest number this function will return. I'm pretty sure I have broken code in production because of this. – Brandon Nov 10 '14 at 20:46
up vote 51 down vote accepted

The maxValue for the upper-bound in the Next() method is exclusive—the range includes minValue, maxValue-1, and all numbers in between.

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1  
Any thoughts on why they chose to make one inclusive, and the other exclusive? Seems kinda peculiar... – Antonio Nakic Alfirevic Mar 7 at 15:52
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One reason of which I can think is array[random.Next(0, array.Length)] – Mark Cidade Mar 7 at 20:10
    
Yea, makes sense for generating collection indices, I can imagine that being an important use case. – Antonio Nakic Alfirevic Mar 8 at 8:37
    
The Name maxValue (as the Parameter is called) is actively misleading. It should be called upper Bound. As the Maximum is always an element of a set. – Harry Berry May 27 at 11:20

The documentation says the upper bound is exclusive. Exclusive means that it is not included in the possible return set. In a more mathematical notation 0 <= x < 5 in this case.

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Straight from the documentation:

 Summary:
   Returns a random number within a specified range.

 Parameters:
   minValue:
     The inclusive lower bound of the random number returned.

   maxValue:
     The exclusive upper bound of the random number returned. maxValue must be
     greater than or equal to minValue.

 Returns:
     A 32-bit signed integer greater than or equal to minValue and less than maxValue;
     that is, the range of return values includes minValue but not maxValue. If
     minValue equals maxValue, minValue is returned.

If you look at the parameters, you will see that minValue is inclusive (which is why your 0 occurs) and maxValue is exclusive (your 5 never occurs).

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When you just look in Google for "c# random" and follow the first links to the method of desire you get here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa329893(v=vs.71).aspx

And there is no hint about the exclusiveness of the upper bound. They must have found the mistake in the code and corrected it with documentation.

So it is important to always check the version of the framework when looking at the documentation. Even when working with old versions of the framework, it is worth to have a look at the newer documentation.

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Followed the link you posted and found this: "Return Value - A 32-bit signed integer greater than or equal to minValue and less than maxValue; that is, the range of return values includes minValue but not MaxValue. If minValue equals maxValue, minValue is returned." – dbasnett Jun 16 '11 at 11:08
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As dbasnett says, the documentation does specify the behaviour here. Not only that, but this is the conventional way of defining a range for something like random numbers. Your guess that this was actually a bug is a poor one, IMO. – Jon Skeet Mar 28 '13 at 16:31

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