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I am running the below program on 2 different machines with different architectures. The practice in our organization is to build the executable in New York machine and copy it to Singapore machine.

Below is the architecture in New York and Singapore Machine.

New York: SunOS pns15a-5203a 5.10 Generic_137111-04 sun4u sparc SUNW,Sun-Fire-V440

Singapore: SunOS sgs75a-5201b 5.10 Generic_137111-04 sun4v sparc SUNW,SPARC-Enterprise-T5220

#include <cstdio>
#include <sys/time.h>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <cstring>

using namespace std;


int main (int argc, char **argv)
{
        char **p;
        int num_allocations = atoi(argv[1]);

        clock_t start = clock();

        p =  new char* [num_allocations];

        clock_t end1 = clock();

        for (int ii=0; ii< num_allocations; ii++)
        {
                p[ii] = new char [num_allocations];
                memset (p[ii], sizeof(char)*num_allocations, '\0');
        }

        clock_t end2 = clock();


        for (int ii=0; ii< num_allocations; ii++)
        {
                delete[] p[ii];
        }
        delete[] p;

        printf("Time Taken for allocations(%d) = %lf seconds for initialization %.2f seconds \n", num_allocations, (double)(end1 - start)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC, (double)(end2 - end1)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC);

}

I am running the program for different char sizes.

./run_test.csh

#!/bin/csh -f -x

./a.out 1
./a.out 1024
./a.out 2048
./a.out 4096
./a.out 8192
./a.out 16384

The output for Newyork and Singapore machine is given below.

New York Machine:
Time Taken for allocations(1) = 0.000000 seconds for initialization 0.00 seconds
Time Taken for allocations(1024) = 0.000000 seconds for initialization 0.00 seconds
Time Taken for allocations(2048) = 0.000000 seconds for initialization 0.01 seconds
Time Taken for allocations(4096) = 0.000000 seconds for initialization 0.03 seconds
Time Taken for allocations(8192) = 0.000000 seconds for initialization 0.11 seconds
Time Taken for allocations(16384) = 0.000000 seconds for initialization 0.37 seconds

Time Taken for Singapore Machine:

Time Taken for allocations(1) = 0.000000 seconds for initialization 0.00 seconds
Time Taken for allocations(1024) = 0.000000 seconds for initialization 0.00 seconds
Time Taken for allocations(2048) = 0.000000 seconds for initialization 0.02 seconds
Time Taken for allocations(4096) = 0.000000 seconds for initialization 0.05 seconds
Time Taken for allocations(8192) = 0.000000 seconds for initialization 0.18 seconds
Time Taken for allocations(16384) = 0.000000 seconds for initialization 0.53 seconds

How do I start investigating the issue ?

share|improve this question
    
How many times have you run this? Do you have exclusive access to these machines? –  Michael Aaron Safyan Feb 21 '11 at 7:36
    
I kept running it for 10 times or so. The execution speeds are consistent on both of them. –  Jagannath Feb 21 '11 at 7:38
6  
So what is the issue then? V440 != T5220; Indeed it would be very strange if the execution times would be identical! –  janneb Feb 21 '11 at 7:45
1  
Even if the hardware was identical, different implementations of new/malloc could result in differing execution times. –  Thomas Edleson Feb 21 '11 at 7:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When benchmarking a function, it is incredibly important to perform the operation a very large number of times, and then divide the overall time by the number of runs. Otherwise, your timing results will just be too noisy to be meaningful. Also, if the machine is being used by other people, the timing can be impacted by other jobs on that machine. If your goal is to benchmark just the particular function in question (and you aren't necessarily trying to get a feel for the performance when contending for resources with other users on the machine), then it is also common to take the fastest result among several repeated runs (this also gives you an idea of the speed once the cache has warmed up).

If you've really only run what it looks like you've run, it sounds like your result is too noisy to really say anything at all. As a first step, I would suggest wrapping the content of your main function in a loop, and repeat it N times and then divide the total time by N at the very end. Also, are you sure you want to be measuring the number of clock cycles, instead of the wall time (as measured by gettimeofday)?

Assuming that you are following reasonable procedures for measuring the timing, if you notice a difference in timing with increased size where the algorithm is otherwise unchanged, this could be the result of different cache sizes (e.g. L1 and L2 cache or different amounts of RAM). If one machine has larger cache than the other, you would expect the machine with the smaller cache to have noticeably slower timing at the point where it was starting to get cache misses while everything still fit in cache for the other machine. As a starting point, I would look at those machine specs.

share|improve this answer
    
OK.I would run it for some N times and will use gettimeofday. –  Jagannath Feb 21 '11 at 7:45
    
I ran the test again with gettimeofday and repeated the test several times. Still, the server with better hardware is slower. May be there are other factors that are causing the slowdown. Will check. Thanks for the headsup. –  Jagannath Feb 21 '11 at 22:27

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