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This might be a nightmare.

Let's say I have two rows of data in two different tables, each row containing one character each. A is Row1 and B is Row2 in Table1 and is reversed in Table2. B is Row1 and A is Row2.

I also have a third table that contains three columns. The first two are columns to be joined on, and the third is the resulting value, depending on what was joined in the first two columns.

A,A= 1
A,B=.8
A,C=.2
B,A=.8
B,B= 1
B,C=.6
C,A=.2
C,B=.6
C,C= 1

What I'm trying to do, in essence, is try finding the highest-rated pairs from Table1 and Table2 by using associated values within Table3.

A,A= 1
B,B= 1

Because of the matching A's in Table1+2 and matching B's in Table1+2. Instead, I forgot that by just aimlessly joining tables, I get this instead:

A,A= 1
A,B=.8
B,A=.8
B,B= 1

However, I'm getting ALL possible pairs, and that won't work. And the problem here is that I cannot do a direct JOIN between Table1+2, because a value within Table1 might not match up with Table2, for instance...

Row1 and Row2 in Table1 is A,B and Row1 and Row2 in Table2 is B,C. If I do a direct JOIN, values A and C won't line up with each other, leaving me only with the pairs of B.

I thought of one more problem with this, though! In trying to use a subquery, the subquery would be constantly re-run... meaning that previously selected rows would then be up for grabs again the next time, leading to incorrect values.

For instance, with A,B and B,C... I would expect to get this returned via subqueries:

A,B=.8
B,B= 1

Unless, of course, there's a way from disqualifying a row from being used again. Any suggestions or ideas? I'm using Access but I'm sure the concepts apply to any database solution.

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In a relational database, there is no such thing as row 1 or row 2, the only way you can have a row number is with an Id of some sort, but you do not mention an Id. What makes a row row 1 or row 2 in your tables? –  Fionnuala Feb 21 '11 at 10:33
    
There are IDs, I figured that'd be a given. –  Jeffrey Kern Feb 22 '11 at 3:23

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