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For example, i see myself doing things like this latley, when i create an object, if it has a logical path of tasks then

public Class Link
{
    public Link(String value)
    {
        callMethodA(value)
    }

    public void callMethodA(String data)
    { 
        CallMethodB(doSomethingWithValue)
    }
    ...
    ...
}

Here you can see, as soon as you instantiate the object, yours tasks get completed automatically.

The other way i can see of doing it is by creating an object, that doesnt link via the constructor, then calling methods individually.

Which was is right and why?

Thanks

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7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Either way we can implement.

Recommended way is to do tasks like initialization stuffs within the constructor and rest of the things can be implemented by way of calling the method with its reference object.

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for such scenario one should go for Factory pattern

for example:

Calendar.getInstance();
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Constructor should do ALL that requires to make an object complete. That is, if without calling method callMethodA , if the object is incomplete then callMethodA must be called from constructor itself. If the callMethodA is optional API then the user of class Link can call the method when he wants.

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I prefer second method. Constructor's job is to initialize the class members. Any modification to change the state of the object needs to be done seperately by member functions.

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As long as the objects that are created do not have nothing in common the current way of creating them is fine. Factory Method or Abstract Factory pattern makes sense when there's similarity between created objects. They'll help you isolate the parts that are always the same and moving parts that define differences between objects.

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It depends on business logic involved. Both ways are practical. If you want to simply initiate instance specific data, then better to do it in constructor method itself which is more logical and simple. It will save calling other methods explicitly unnecessarily. If instanciating your data is based on certain buisiness condition, then it is good to have main functionality in separate method and then conditionally call it from constructor. This is easy to manage in such scenario.

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A constructor is meant to bring the object in the correct initial state. So use it for that purpose. As a general rule of thumb, only use a constructor to set properties. Basic calculations are also ok.

I would not recommend calling very time consuming methods, or methods that are likely to throw exceptions (like calling a webservice or access a file).

When you need to do very special things to bring the object in its initial state, make the constructor private and use a static method to create the object.

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