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Is there a way to detect whether a value is a number is MySQL query?

ie. SELECT * FROM myTable WHERE isANumber(col1)=true

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6 Answers 6

up vote 65 down vote accepted

This should work in most cases.

SELECT * FROM myTable WHERE concat('',col1 * 1) = col1

It doesn't work for non-standard numbers like

  • 1e4
  • 1.2e5
  • 123. (trailing decimal)
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Thank you. Unfortunately I need it to recognise that 123 is a number, but 123X is not. –  Urbycoz Feb 21 '11 at 11:42
    
@Urbycoz - have you tried it? It does exactly that –  RichardTheKiwi Feb 21 '11 at 11:43
    
@Richard- I just read the exceptions you gave. Thought you meant the character "e". I see what you mean now. –  Urbycoz Feb 21 '11 at 12:53
    
Now THAT is extremely clever. It works. –  Urbycoz Feb 21 '11 at 12:54
7  
Also doesn't work for leading zeros such as 001 –  Rob G Oct 19 '12 at 23:35

This answer is similar to Dmitry, but it will allow for decimals as well as positive and negative numbers.

select * from table where col1 REGEXP '^[[:digit:]]+$'
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Another alternative that seems faster than REGEXP on my computer is

SELECT * FROM myTable WHERE col1*0 != col1;

This will select all rows where col1 starts with a numeric value.

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What about if the value is zero? –  Urbycoz Nov 3 '14 at 8:30
    
True, won't work, thanks for the observation. –  Stian Hvatum Nov 3 '14 at 9:03
    
I guess you could just add AND col1<>0 to handle that exception. –  Urbycoz Nov 3 '14 at 9:12
    
It is true that it doesn't work for zero values but it perfectly works for padded numbers, e.g. 004. The accepted answer does not work for padded numbers –  Abbas Jan 15 at 1:55
    
I think this is the best way to check for numbers. It's just that we need to add an OR statement for checking zero, as SELECT * FROM myTable WHERE col1*0 != col1 OR col1='0'; –  Binu Raman Apr 20 at 8:25

If your data is 'test', 'test0', 'test1111', '111test', '111'

SELECT * 
FROM myTable 
WHERE col1 REGEXP '^[0-9]+$';

Result: '111'

In regex ^ mean begin, and $ - end.

SELECT * 
FROM myTable 
WHERE col1 REGEXP '^[0-9]+\\.?[0-9]*$'; - for 123.12

But, select all records where number exists:

SELECT * 
FROM myTable 
WHERE col1 REGEXP '[0-9]+';

Result: 'test0' and 'test1111' and '111test' and '111'

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I like this approach better because it's clearer and less "hackish" than the concatenation trick. Thanks! –  CullenJ Oct 22 '13 at 21:57

You can use Regular Expression too... it would be like:

SELECT * FROM myTable WHERE col1 REGEXP '[0-9]+';

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/regexp.html

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26  
SELECT * FROM myTable WHERE col1 REGEXP '^[0-9]+$'; –  Dmitriy Kozmenko Mar 22 '13 at 19:29
1  
The accepted answer is really clever, but this answer is more direct, and I think it should be the accepted solution. –  pedromanoel Oct 30 '13 at 15:50
3  
For the case of "doesn't match": WHERE col1 NOT REGEXP..., and for the case where you might have a decimal point, use regex: ^[0-9\.]+$ –  scrowler Dec 3 '13 at 23:44
    
@DmitriyKozmenko If "number" includes decimals, then the regexp is no longer "more direct" and a solution is not offerred in comments or the answer. –  RichardTheKiwi May 11 at 3:28

Look here : How do I check to see if a value is an integer in MySQL?

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3  
That link is for integer. The question is numeric (literal interpretation) –  RichardTheKiwi Feb 21 '11 at 10:57

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