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I am trying to create an exception class. For this I overloaded the << operator. So the code is something like this

class RunAndCheck
{
     opearator << (boost::any given)
     {

         //Here goes the value of the    "given"

     }
};

The usage is like this

RunAndCheck s;
s << file->open() << __FILE__ << __LINE__ ; 

So the problem is that I want to know the type of the FILE, then only I can extract the string out of boost::any. Can anybody invoke your curiosity around this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

__FILE__ expands into a string literal, just as if you had written "/path/to/current/file.cpp" directly. String literals are non-modifiable char array lvalues.

You want to template that << instead of using boost::any:

class RunAndCheck {
public:
    template<class T>
    RunAndCheck& operator<<(const T& value) {
        // ...
        return *this;
    }
};

Or you want to provide overloads for all the acceptable types:

class RunAndCheck {
public:
    RunAndCheck& operator<<(const char* value) {
        // ...
        return *this;
    }
    RunAndCheck& operator<<(int value) {
        // ...
        return *this;
    }
};
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I have to use some if else conditions based on the type, like if(the input is no) cout << " line no " << no, if(is string) cout << " file name " << fileName. Can you say how to achieve that? –  prabhakaran Feb 21 '11 at 11:07
    
the above second code worked like a magic, thank you thomas –  prabhakaran Feb 21 '11 at 11:22
    
@prabhakaran: Make sure you look at visitor's answer. Even though I resolved the syntax/type problem you asked about, the other is the correct semantic solution. –  Thomas Edleson Feb 21 '11 at 13:03

Macros do not have types, they are just text replacements made by the preprocessor (without type checks). The type of the value dropped in by __FILE__ is a constant C string.

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@jdehaan Can you explain me further. Is C String means CString or some other –  prabhakaran Feb 21 '11 at 11:01
3  
he means const char*. –  Stephane Rolland Feb 21 '11 at 11:09
3  
@Stephane Rolland: const char* is incorrect, though you can get that from a string literal. –  Thomas Edleson Feb 21 '11 at 11:10
    
a C string is not a class. it is a const literal, exactly if you typed "c:\path\file.cpp" directly into the source code. The type of that string literal is const char[]. –  tenfour Feb 21 '11 at 11:10
1  
Saying "macros do not have types" is less than useful. The value that a macro expands to has a type, just as all values do. –  Jim Balter Feb 21 '11 at 11:37

__FILE__ is replaced by a string literal, whose type is

const char[length_of_particular_string]

You should really reconsider what you are doing. (Opinion also based on your previous question.)

Firstly, boost::any is no good for such usage (in particular since the type of the string literal will be different in different cases). But even if not for the technical difficulties, you should use normal function overloading.

More importantly, it seems that the functionality that you want is to receive a boolean value and throw an error containing the file name and line number if the value is not true. Since you always require all 3 components (although according to your description it would be possible to have it throw without giving it the file name, or have the class do nothing useful), a function that takes those 3 arguments makes more sense.

Furthermore, you can now wrap calls to this in a macro, so that the file name and line number are automatically provided.

Full example:

#include <stdexcept>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>

void check_result(bool result, const char* line, int line_number)
{
    if (!result) {
        //for example:
        std::stringstream ss;
        ss << line << ' ' << line_number;
        throw std::runtime_error(ss.str()); 
    } 
} 

#define CALL_AND_CHECK(expression) check_result((expression), __FILE__, __LINE__)

bool foobar(bool b) { return b; }

int main()
{
    try {
        CALL_AND_CHECK(foobar(true));
        CALL_AND_CHECK(foobar(false));
    } catch (const std::exception& e) {
        std::cout << e.what() << '\n';
    }
}
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Very good advice, but you might want to change __LINE__ to __FILE__. :) –  Thomas Edleson Feb 21 '11 at 11:53
    
see that previous question's new edit ("stackoverflow.com/questions/5062699/…;). –  prabhakaran Mar 1 '11 at 6:53

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