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Is there an easier way of doing this instead of inserting each element into the array manually

stack_of_cards << Card.new("A", "Spades", 1)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("2", "Spades", 2)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("3", "Spades", 3)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("4", "Spades", 4)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("5", "Spades", 5)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("6", "Spades", 6)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("7", "Spades", 7)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("8", "Spades", 8)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("9", "Spades", 9)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("10", "Spades", 10)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("J", "Spades", 11)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("Q", "Spades", 12)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("K", "Spades", 13)

stack_of_cards << Card.new("A", "Hearts", 1)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("2", "Hearts", 2)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("3", "Hearts", 3)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("4", "Hearts", 4)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("5", "Hearts", 5)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("6", "Hearts", 6)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("7", "Hearts", 7)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("8", "Hearts", 8)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("9", "Hearts", 9)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("10", "Hearts", 10)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("J", "Hearts", 11)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("Q", "Hearts", 12)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("K", "Hearts", 13)

stack_of_cards << Card.new("A", "Diamonds", 1)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("2", "Diamonds", 2)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("3", "Diamonds", 3)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("4", "Diamonds", 4)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("5", "Diamonds", 5)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("6", "Diamonds", 6)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("7", "Diamonds", 7)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("8", "Diamonds", 8)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("9", "Diamonds", 9)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("10", "Diamonds", 10)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("J", "Diamonds", 11)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("Q", "Diamonds", 12)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("K", "Diamonds", 13)

stack_of_cards << Card.new("A", "Clubs", 1)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("2", "Clubs", 2)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("3", "Clubs", 3)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("4", "Clubs", 4)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("5", "Clubs", 5)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("6", "Clubs", 6)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("7", "Clubs", 7)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("8", "Clubs", 8)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("9", "Clubs", 9)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("10", "Clubs", 10)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("J", "Clubs", 11)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("Q", "Clubs", 12)
stack_of_cards << Card.new("K", "Clubs", 13)
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Devise a scheme to represent each card with a number, write methods to determine its face and type. Then just populate a array using a loop number from 1 to 52 –  Zimbabao Feb 21 '11 at 11:57

6 Answers 6

Just loop over both ranks and suits.

ranks = %w{A 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 J Q K}
suits = %w{Spades Hearts Diamonds Clubs}
suits.each do |suit|
  ranks.size.times do |i|
    stack_of_cards << Card.new( ranks[i], suit, i+1 )
  end
end
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1  
I might alternatively suggest that the inner loop should be: ranks.each_with_index do |rank,i| allowing one to replace ranks[i] with rank. –  Phrogz Feb 21 '11 at 12:46
    
I'd use suits.product(ranks.with_index.to_a).map do |suit, (rank, index)| –  Andrew Grimm Feb 21 '11 at 21:35

Yes, there is: Create an array of faces and an array of suits then iterate over them in a nested loop. Also change the Card class so that you don't need to specify the face as a string an integer as that is redundant. It's most convenient if you only need to specify the int parameter.

This way the code would look like this:

faces = 1..13
suits = %w(Spades Hearts Diamonds Clubs)
cards = suits.flat_map do |suit|
  faces.map |face_int_value|
    Card.new(suit, face_int_value)
  end
end

Or in ruby before 1.9.2:

faces = 1..13
suits = %w(Spades Hearts Diamonds Clubs)
cards = suits.map do |suit|
  faces.map |face_int_value|
    Card.new(suit, face_int_value)
  end
end.flatten
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+1. Despite my at least superficial familiarity with Scala's for comprehensions and C#'s LINQ query comprehensions, both of which are built on flatMap (or SelectMany as .NET calls it), I always forget that it is also in Enumerable now. –  Jörg W Mittag Feb 22 '11 at 2:22

First off: why do you represent the rank and the value of a card separately? Is there ever an instance where, say, a Jack does not have the value 11? For example, why do you have

Card.new("7", "Spades", 7)

instead of just

Card.new(7, "Spades")

and is there ever an instance where you would have

Card.new("7", "Spades", 42)

If not, then those two should be packaged together into an object.

Also, why are the suits represented as strings and not as Suits or at least as symbols?

I'd probably do something like this:

Rank = Struct.new(:rank, :value) do
  def to_s; rank end
  alias_method :inspect, :to_s
end

Card = Struct.new(:rank, :suit) do
  def to_s; "#{rank} of #{suit.capitalize}" end
  alias_method :inspect, :to_s
end

ranks = %w[Ace 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Jack Queen King].map.with_index {|rank, value|
  Rank.new(rank, value + 1)
}

suits = [:spades, :hearts, :diamonds, :clubs]

deck = suits.product(ranks).map {|suit, rank| Card.new(rank, suit) }
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Building on Mark Rushakoff solution and using Ruby 1.9

Card = Struct.new(:rank, :suit,:rank_id) 
ranks = %w{A 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 J Q K}
suits = %w{Spades Hearts Diamonds Clubs}
stack_of_cards = suits.each_with_object([]) do |suit,res|
  ranks.size.times do |i|
    res << Card.new(ranks[i], suit,i + 1)
  end
end
puts stack_of_cards.inspect
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David A. Black's The Well Grounded Rubyist uses deck initialization as a way to demonstrate the cycle method. I think the resulting code is clever, and very simple:

class Card 
  SUITS = %w{ clubs diamonds hearts spades } 
  RANKS=%w{2345678910JQKA}
  class Deck 
    attr_reader :cards
    def initialize(n=1) 
      @cards = [] SUITS.cycle(n) do |s|
        RANKS.cycle(1) do |r| @cards << "#{r} of #{s}"
        end
      end
    end 
  end
end

Also, the Ruby Quiz #1: The Solitaire Cipher involved using a deck of cards to encode a message. Check out the solutions. You'll see a few different ways used to tackle this problem.

share|improve this answer
Card = Struct.new(:name, :suit,:number) 
stack_of_cards = []
%w{'Spades Hearts Diamonds Clubs'}.each do |suit|
    %w{'A 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 J Q K'}.each_with_index do |name, i|
        stack_of_cards << Card.new(name, suit, i+1) 
    end
end
p stack_of_cards
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