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my Linq query is.

string spouseName="jenny";
var empData = from sData in EmpList
              from member in sData.familyNames
              where string.Compare(member, spouseName, true) == 0
              select new Employee
              {
                  CompanyDept = sData.company,
                  EmpName = sData.empName,
                  FamilyNames.Add(spouse)   //ERROR HERE Not able to access as list
              };

Here empList is List<Employee>

class Employee
{
   private string companyDept
   private string empName
   private List<string> _familyNames = new List<string>();

   public string CompanyDept
   {
      get { return companyDept}
      set { companyDept= value; }
   }

   public string EmpName
   {
      get { return empName}
      set { empName= value; }
   }

   public List<string> FamilyNames 
   {
      get { return _familyNames }
      set { _familyNames = value; }
   }
}

Question:

Here I am trying to get a linq output as of type Employee... but the list familyNames contains only one item spouse name, not list of all family members.??

But I am getting error at familyList. Not able to add items to familyNames List to not able to assign.

Need help, why error is comming or I am wrong somewhere?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The correct translation is:

select new Employee
{
    CompanyDept = sData.company,
    EmpName = sData.empName,
    FamilyNames = { spouse } // 'nested' collection-initializer
};

The reason is that you only need an Add call on FamilyMember, not a full property reassignment to a new list, which is what FamilyNames = new List<string> { spouse } would do.

Loosely speaking, this translates to:

var temp = new Employee();
temp.CompanyDept = sData.company;
temp.EmpName = sData.empName;
temp.FamilyNames.Add(spouse);
return temp; // this is selected.
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1  
I had no idea you could do this! –  saus Feb 21 '11 at 12:35
    
hmm.... this works too. These are 4.0 features. Probably we do assigning new list to Add. –  PawanS Feb 21 '11 at 15:02

You need to initialize the list yourself. Change:

FamilyNames.Add(spouse)

To:

FamilyNames = new List<string>(new []{ spouse })
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Oh thanx... it worked. But why like that. I mean whenever I create any object of employee, I can directly add to familyNames. But why not in this case. –  PawanS Feb 21 '11 at 12:13
1  
@GAPS, that is the way object initializers work. Basically you cannot access a member property while constructing the object, but you can assign to it. –  Klaus Byskov Pedersen Feb 21 '11 at 12:16
    
@Klause that is true. But when we initilize in normal way we can use the member property also right... Employee ee = new Employee(); ee.companyDept="xyz" ee.empName="abc" ee.FamilyName.Add("NameAny") This way we can access. Then what happen to my LINQ case –  PawanS Feb 21 '11 at 15:06

It should be something like

select new Employee
{
    CompanyDept = sData.company,
    EmpName = sData.empName,
   // FamilyNames.Add(spouse)   //ERROR HERE Not able to access as list
     FamilyNames = new List<string> {spouse}
} ;

Although I would have expected sData.spouse or member.spouse

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Since the OP only needs an Add (and not a full reassignment of the list), make the last line: FamilyNames = { spouse } –  Ani Feb 21 '11 at 12:15
    
There is, it's created in the field-initializer. –  Ani Feb 21 '11 at 12:19
    
@Ani, yes, I missed that. I prefer the new inside the select myself. –  Henk Holterman Feb 21 '11 at 12:26
    
Fair enough, but they aren't equivalent. Imagine if a) there was no setter - wouldn't compile b) the list were pre-populated in the constructor - different results. –  Ani Feb 21 '11 at 12:31

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