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Im trying to find a int inside another programs memory (my own little c++ that only holds that variable). The value is 1234, but i cant seem to find it :-(

Ill post what im doing

            for (uint adr = 0x00000000; adr <= 0x7FFFFFFF; adr += 1)
            {
                // we want status...
                uint progress = (adr*100) / 0x7FFFFFFF;
                Console.WriteLine("Progress: {0} %", progress);

                // look for a int
                IntPtr bytes;
                byte[] buffer = new byte[4];

                ReadProcessMemory(process, adr, buffer, 4, out bytes);

                if (BitConverter.ToInt32(buffer, 0) == 1234)
                {
                    // we found it...
                }
            }

There are several errors, for 1 the progress does not work and i never get a hit on found. Help someone? :D

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. Maybe this value 1234 is saved in 2 byte value not 4 byte.
  2. Check readprocess memory not throw you error because you not OpenProcess.
  3. Try big endian reading too, then try reverse bits before reading.
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But the loop looks OK? I did mention that progress is always 0 –  Jason94 Feb 21 '11 at 12:35
    
@Jason94: Loop is ok, progress is always 0 because you saving value to uint, you should use double. –  Svisstack Feb 21 '11 at 12:54
    
@Svisstack: do you mean double progress = (adr*100) / 0x7FFFFFFF; I'm kinda lost in bits and bytes right now :P –  Jason94 Feb 21 '11 at 13:20
    
@Jason94: i mean double progress = (((double)adr)*100) / 0x7FFFFFFF; –  Svisstack Feb 21 '11 at 15:17
    
@Svisstack: thanks for the correction. But with adr++ it takes me ages to get even 1%! is the stop value, 0x7FFFFFFF, valid? In processlist the app takes up 388kB if that helps. –  Jason94 Feb 22 '11 at 9:26

You can compare results from your program with output of some advanced memory scanner, such as cheatengine.

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