Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

what's the best way to make main thread to wait until all threads are finished?

for(int i=0;i<n;i++){
   Thread t=new Thread();
   t.start();

}

//wait for all threads to finish

share|improve this question
    
tried waitFor()? –  Nishant Feb 21 '11 at 12:51
8  
use Thread.join(). –  Harry Joy Feb 21 '11 at 12:51
    
@Harry its thread.join(); –  Jigar Joshi Feb 21 '11 at 12:57
1  
@Jigar: yes I know. I just gave him a hint. He can then search on.. for more details. –  Harry Joy Feb 21 '11 at 12:58
    
@Nishant, waitFor is a method on process, right? –  user121196 Feb 21 '11 at 13:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Create a list and wait for the all.

List<Thread> threads = new ArrayList<Thread>();
for(int i=0;i<n;i++){
    Thread t=new Thread();
    t.start();
    threads.add(t);
}

for(Thread t: threads) t.join();

However using an ExecutorService can be a more elegant way to handle a pool of threads.

ExecutorService es = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();
for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
   es.submit(new Task(n));
es.shutdown();
es.awaitTermination(timeout, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
share|improve this answer
List<Thread> threads = new ArrayList<Thread>();

for(int i=0;i<n;i++){
   Thread t=new Thread();
   threads.add(t);
   t.start();

}


for(Thread t:threads){
t.join();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Exactly what I tried to suggest. –  Harry Joy Feb 21 '11 at 12:56
    
this works, interestingly I made the mistake earlier by making t.start();t.join() in the same code block. –  user121196 Feb 21 '11 at 13:03
    
why down vote?, please let me know the reason –  Jigar Joshi Feb 21 '11 at 13:04

It can be done using thread.join( );.

It is also answered here already. Have a look.

Example :

class MyThread implements Runnable {
  String name; // name of thread

  Thread t;

  MyThread(String threadname) {
    name = threadname;
    t = new Thread(this, name);
    System.out.println("New thread: " + t);
    t.start();
  }

  public void run() {
    try {
      for (int i = 5; i > 0; i--) {
        System.out.println(name + ": " + i);
        Thread.sleep(1000);
      }
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
      System.out.println(name + " interrupted.");
    }
    System.out.println(name + " exiting.");
  }
}

public class MainClass {
  public static void main(String args[]) {
    MyThread ob1 = new MyThread("One");
    MyThread ob2 = new MyThread("Two");
    MyThread ob3 = new MyThread("Three");

    System.out.println("Thread One is alive: " + ob1.t.isAlive());
    System.out.println("Thread Two is alive: " + ob2.t.isAlive());
    System.out.println("Thread Three is alive: " + ob3.t.isAlive());

    try {
      System.out.println("Waiting for threads to finish.");
      ob1.t.join();
      ob2.t.join();
      ob3.t.join();
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
      System.out.println("Main thread Interrupted");
    }

    System.out.println("Thread One is alive: " + ob1.t.isAlive());
    System.out.println("Thread Two is alive: " + ob2.t.isAlive());
    System.out.println("Thread Three is alive: " + ob3.t.isAlive());

    System.out.println("Main thread exiting.");
  }
}    

Although the question is tagged under "java", it can be also done in C# in following ways

share|improve this answer

I think for your requirement the best solution is the CyclicBarrier look at http://download.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/CyclicBarrier.html

or

at this example

share|improve this answer
    
Your API link is to an old version of Java. Use Java 6 instead. –  jzd Feb 21 '11 at 13:02
    

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.