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I know we can

INSERT INTO "Table1" VALUES(X'57A00F3015310D4081AD4ADEF3EBDB5E');

But this little endian format is difficult to compare to the original Guid

300FA057-3115-400D-81AD-4ADEF3EBDB5E

How to use the original Guid in the SQL statement instead of the little endian one?

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you want to easily compare to the original without converting then store it as text. It'll take more storage space and will be slower to read/write/compare, but it'll be more human readable.

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I was looking for a SQLite script using CONVERT, CAST or REPLACE that could convert it for me. –  Jader Dias Feb 25 '11 at 16:10
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@Jader Dias, SQLite doesn't natively support guids, so you won't find one. You can write custom functions though easily enough. –  Samuel Neff Feb 25 '11 at 19:37
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try this:

INSERT INTO [Table1] ([UID]) VALUES ('{57A00F30-1531-0D40-81AD-4ADEF3EBDB5E}');

I always do in this way, didn't find any problem.

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forgot to tell, i write in this way with sqlite. hope mssql works. –  Grammy Feb 21 '13 at 8:28
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protected by Jader Dias Mar 3 '13 at 15:46

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