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I was playing around with the Datetime.ParseExact method, and it wants an iformatprovider..

It works inputting null, but what exactly does it do?

Thanks :)

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1  
Note to user: Andrei Rinea's answer is probably what you want. –  stolsvik Apr 18 '12 at 7:02
    
possible duplicate of Why DateTime.ParseExact(String, String, IFormatProvider) need the IFormatProvider?. I'm voting to close with a newer one because it is worded better, and has better answer. –  nawfal Jan 23 at 4:21

7 Answers 7

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Also CultureInfo implements this interface and can be used in your case. So you could parse a French date string for example; you could use

var ci = new CultureInfo("fr-FR");
DateTime dt = DateTime.Parse(yourDateInputString, yourFormatString, ci);
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Passing null as the IFormatProvider is not the correct way to do this. If the user has a custom date/time format on their PC you'll have issues in parsing and converting to string. I've just fixed a bug where somebody had passed null as the IFormatProvider when converting to string.

Instead you should be using CultureInfo.InvariantCulture

Wrong:

string output = theDate.ToString("dd/MM/yy HH:mm:ss.fff", null);

Correct:

string output = theDate.ToString("dd/MM/yy HH:mm:ss.fff", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
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1  
Is there any reason we should use CultureInfo.InvariantCulture instead of CultureInfo.CurrentCulture? –  Stephen Booher Mar 11 '13 at 17:47
3  
InvariantCulture is a special culture which is guaranteed to always exist on any machine and will always convert and parse back to the same values. CurrentCulture is the culture of the current thread. This can vary and if you don't use the same culture to convert to string and parse, you'll get format errors... –  Jim Mar 11 '13 at 22:25

You can see here http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.iformatprovider.aspx

See the remarks and example section there.

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3  
Ironically the sample code for IFormatProvider doesn't use IFormatProvider. –  Ian Boyd Aug 12 '13 at 18:44

The IFormatProvider interface is normally implemented for you by a CultureInfo class, e.g.:

  • CultureInfo.CurrentCulture
  • CultureInfo.CurrentUICulture
  • CultureInfo.InvariantCulture
  • CultureInfo.CreateSpecificCulture("de-CA") //German (Canada)

The interface is a gateway for a function to get a set of culture-specific data from a culture. The two commonly available culture objects that an IFormatProvider can be queried for are:

  • DateTimeFormatInfo
  • NumberFormatInfo

The way it would normally work is you ask the IFormatProvider to give you a DateTimeFormatInfo object:

DateTimeFormatInfo format;
format = (DateTimeFormatInfo)provider.GetFormat(typeof(DateTimeFormatInfo));
if (format != null)
   DoStuffWithDatesOrTimes(format);

There's also inside knowledge that any IFormatProvider interface is likely being implemented by a class that descends from CultureInfo, or descends from DateTimeFormatInfo, so you could cast the interface directly:

CultureInfo info = provider as CultureInfo;
if (info != null)
   format = info.DateTimeInfo;
else
{
   DateTimeFormatInfo dtfi = provider as DateTimeFormatInfo;
   if (dtfi != null)
       format = dtfi;
   else
       format = (DateTimeFormatInfo)provider.GetFormat(typeof(DateTimeFormatInfo));
}

if (format != null)
   DoStuffWithDatesOrTimes(format);

But don't do that

All that hard work has already been written for you:

To get a DateTimeFormatInfo from an IFormatProvider:

DateTimeFormatInfo format = DateTimeFormatInfo.GetInstance(provider);

To get a NumberFormatInfo from an IFormatProvider:

NumberFormatInfo format = NumberFormatInfo.GetInstance(provider);

The value of IFormatProvider is that you create your own culture objects. As long as they implement IFormatProvider, and return objects they're asked for, you can bypass the built-in cultures.

You can also use IFormatProvider for a way of passing arbitrary culture objects - through the IFormatProvider. E.g. the name of god in different cultures

  • god
  • God
  • Jehova
  • Yahwe
  • יהוה
  • אהיה אשר אהיה

This lets your custom LordsNameFormatInfo class ride along inside an IFormatProvider, and you can preserve the idiom.

In reality you will never need to call GetFormat method of IFormatProvider yourself.

Whenever you need an IFormatProvider you can pass a CultureInfo object:

DateTime.Now.ToString(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture);

endTime.ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);

transactionID.toString(CultureInfo.CreateSpecificCulture("qps-ploc"));
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IFormatProvider provides culture info to the method in question. DateTimeFormatInfo implements IFormatProvider, and allows you to specify the format you want your date/time to be displayed in. Examples can be found on the relevant MSDN pages.

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The DateTimeFormatInfo class implements this interface, so it allows you to control the formatting of your DateTime strings.

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