Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to simply test out the initialization safety of final fields as guaranteed by the JLS. It is for a paper I'm writing. However, I am unable to get it to 'fail' based on my current code. Can someone tell me what I'm doing wrong, or if this is just something I have to run over and over again and then see a failure with some unlucky timing?

Here is my code:

public class TestClass {

    final int x;
    int y;
    static TestClass f;

    public TestClass() {
        x = 3;
        y = 4;
    }

    static void writer() {
        TestClass.f = new TestClass();
    }

    static void reader() {
        if (TestClass.f != null) {
            int i = TestClass.f.x; // guaranteed to see 3
            int j = TestClass.f.y; // could see 0

            System.out.println("i = " + i);
            System.out.println("j = " + j);
        }
    }
}

and my threads are calling it like this:

public class TestClient {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++) {
            Thread writer = new Thread(new Runnable() {
                @Override
                public void run() {
                    TestClass.writer();
                }
            });

            writer.start();
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++) {
            Thread reader = new Thread(new Runnable() {
                @Override
                public void run() {
                    TestClass.reader();
                }
            });

            reader.start();
        }
    }
}

I have run this scenario many, many times. My current loops are spawning 10,000 threads, but I've done with this 1000, 100000, and even a million. Still no failure. I always see 3 and 4 for both values. How can I get this to fail?

share|improve this question
1  
Good question, I've been trying to get similar examples to fail due to unsafe initialization as well, but with no luck. It would be great if someone provided an example which actually fails. –  axel22 Jan 26 '12 at 14:42
3  
if you wish to test the JVM for final fields you should run on something that's not x86/x64 as the hardware memory model is too strong. –  bestsss Mar 10 '13 at 18:56
    
@bestsss I understand that the goal is to get a run where y is 0. I would have thought that even on x86, introducing some padding to try to put y on a different cache line could lead to that situation (but I could not make it work, even after adding 7 longs betwen x and y)... –  assylias Mar 11 '13 at 7:22
1  
@assylias, different cache lines will be propagated/made consistent in the same way/order they are written (TotalStoreOrder), i.e. the write to 'y' will predate the write to 'f'. You need a semi-buggy compiler that writes to 'f' the unintialized object first and then calls the c-tor... fat chance. One of the reasons 'f' is not written is a possible error in the c-tor, technically even the c-tor call can cause stack overflow (unless inlined and no safe point generated). –  bestsss Mar 11 '13 at 8:19
1  
@palacsint, here is the reference for you, read it - it shall be enough. To put it simply: a compliant JVM has to ensure that. I think the torture tests for jsr166 include a test: github.com/shipilev/java-concurrency-torture/blob/master/src/… :: The official Oracle JLS: docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-17.html#jls-17.5 :: Another reference by J. Manson who wrote the spec : jeremymanson.blogspot.com/2008/12/… –  bestsss Mar 11 '13 at 8:27

8 Answers 8

I wrote the spec. The TL; DR version of this answer is that just because it may see 0 for y, that doesn't mean it is guaranteed to see 0 for y.

In this case, the final field spec guarantees that you will see 3 for x, as you point out. Think of the writer thread as having 4 instructions:

r1 = <create a new TestClass instance>
r1.x = 3;
r1.y = 4;
f = r1;

The reason you might not see 3 for x is if the compiler reordered this code:

r1 = <create a new TestClass instance>
f = r1;
r1.x = 3;
r1.y = 4;

The way the guarantee for final fields is usually implemented in practice is to ensure that the constructor finishes before any subsequent program actions take place. Imagine someone erected a big barrier between r1.y = 4 and f = r1. So, in practice, if you have any final fields for an object, you are likely to get visibility for all of them.

Now, in theory, someone could write a compiler that isn't implemented that way. In fact, many people have often talked about testing code by writing the most malicious compiler possible. This is particularly common among the C++ people, who have lots and lots of undefined corners of their language that can lead to terrible bugs.

share|improve this answer

From Java 5.0, you are guarenteed that all threads will see the final state set by the constructor.

If you want to see this fail, you could try an older JVM like 1.3.

I wouldn't print out every test, I would only print out the failures. You could get one failure in a million but miss it. But if you only print failures, they should be easy to spot.

A simpler way to see this fail is to add to the writer.

f.y = 5;

and test for

int y = TestClass.f.y; // could see 0, 4 or 5
if (y != 5)
    System.out.println("y = " + y);
share|improve this answer
2  
Java 5.0+ guarentees you will always see y = 4 in another thread unless you start the thread in the constructor. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 21 '11 at 14:44
2  
Reading the specification, I believe you are right that it appears to only guarentee final fields, however individual implementation are free to guarentee non-final fields as well. AFAIK Oracle's Java 5.0+ JVM ensures that all fields are visible to all threads as soon as the constructor completes. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 21 '11 at 16:29
1  
Understood. I'll have to take your word for it on that one because I was unable to find this documented anywhere regarding HotSpot. However, even if that is the case, there is no guarantee in my code that the constructor has completed when the reader thread accesses TestClass.f. The reference is already guaranteed to be written thanks to the null check, but there is no guarantee the constructor is finished or the fields have been defaulted. –  sma Feb 21 '11 at 19:01
2  
OK, I am incorrect in my statement above. Turns out the reference to f is set AFTER the constructor completes. I was able to get this to fail by unsafely publishing a reference in the constructor such as: f = this. In this instance, I saw failures on both variables, which is consistent with the semantics on unsafe publishing. However, I am still unable to get the safe publishing guarantee to fail on variable y. –  sma Feb 21 '11 at 19:22
1  
If you want to see this fail, you could try an older JVM like 1.3. Probably you still need to run on ARM/Power architecture to achieve that. On a side note the answer is correct, so whoever disliked should have dropped a note. –  bestsss Mar 10 '13 at 19:35

I'd like to see a test which fails or an explanation why it's not possible with current JVMs.

Multithreading and Testing

You can't prove that a multithreaded application is broken (or not) by testing for several reasons:

  • the problem might only appear once every x hours of running, x being so high that it is unlikely that you see it in a short test
  • the problem might only appear with some combinations of JVM / processor architectures

In your case, to make the test break (i.e. to observe y == 0) would require the program to see a partially constructed object where some fields have been properly constructed and some not. This typically does not happen on x86 / hotspot.

How to determine if a multithreaded code is broken?

The only way to prove that the code is valid or broken is to apply the JLS rules to it and see what the outcome is. With data race publishing (no synchronization around the publication of the object or of y), the JLS provides no guarantee that y will be seen as 4 (it could be seen with its default value of 0).

Can that code really break?

In practice, some JVMs will be better at making the test fail. For example some compilers (cf "A test case showing that it doesn't work" in this article) could transform TestClass.f = new TestClass(); into something like (because it is published via a data race):

(1) allocate memory
(2) write fields default values (x = 0; y = 0) //always first
(3) write final fields final values (x = 3)    //must happen before publication
(4) publish object                             //TestClass.f = new TestClass();
(5) write non final fields (y = 4)             //has been reodered after (4)

The JLS mandates that (2) and (3) happen before the object publication (4). However, due to the data race, no guarantee is given for (5) - it would actually be a legal execution if a thread never observed that write operation. With the proper thread interleaving, it is therefore conceivable that if reader runs between 4 and 5, you will get the desired output.

I don't have a symantec JIT at hand so can't prove it experimentally :-)

share|improve this answer
1  
@Noofiz I think you don't get the point: this is a legal reordering under the current JLS (v7) - the fact that the reordering is unlikely to happen on a current x86/hotspot combination is irrelevant. –  assylias Mar 14 '13 at 9:51
1  
@Noofiz I don't know but it does not matter: it could happen according to the specifications of the language. –  assylias Mar 14 '13 at 10:07
1  
write fields default values (x = 0; y = 4) //always first -- both should be zero as default values - if 4 is written your example fails; I seriously do not see a point in discussing such stuff on stackoverflow, the audience is really far off the mark and in my opinion most of the people just use as copy source to write their own code. –  bestsss Mar 14 '13 at 11:07
1  
another note: (4) can be satisfied only if publishing w/ race, if using volatile/cas/lazySet (4) has to come last. Edit: Probably [altair.cs.oswego.edu/pipermail/concurrency-interest/2012-August/… best) advice I have seen on writing user-space concurrent code. –  bestsss Mar 14 '13 at 11:41
1  
@Tobia That's not me saying, the reodering I took has been explained by the people who wrote the JLS Chapter 17. This post details a similar example and has been written by one of the major contributor to the new memory model introduced with Java 5. –  assylias Mar 17 '13 at 18:20

Here is an example of default values of non final values being observed despite that the constructor sets them and doesn't leak this. This is based off my other question which is a bit more complicated. I keep seeing people say it can't happen on x86, but my example happens on x64 linux openjdk 6...

share|improve this answer

What about you modified the constructor to do this:

public TestClass() {
 Thread.sleep(300);
   x = 3;
   y = 4;
}

I am not an expert on JLF finals and initializers, but common sense tells me this should delay setting x long enough for writers to register another value?

share|improve this answer
    
What about you modified the constructor to do this and nothing will happen (besides needs to throw the InterruperdException) - simple f will be null... –  bestsss Mar 14 '13 at 10:17
    
@bestsss I had a feeling that this would be too simple to be correct –  Jakub Zaverka Mar 14 '13 at 10:24
    
@bestsss: There is no such guarantee when the read is from another thread. It is legal to assign to f before running the constructor if the same thread cannot notice a difference (and some JITs do this). I'm not sure whether the compiler is clever enough to notice that f is not read in Thread.sleep() (a busy-wait might work better), but it requires the JIT to make this optimization, and some of them won't due to broken code. –  tc. Jul 14 '13 at 14:37

What if one changes the scenario into

public class TestClass {

    final int x;
    static TestClass f;

    public TestClass() {
        x = 3;
    }

    int y = 4;

    // etc...

}

?

share|improve this answer
2  
So what did you change? Moved int y = 4; after constructor? Is it a joke? –  Mikhail Mar 12 '13 at 8:06

Better understanding of why this test does not fail can come from understanding of what actually happens when constructor is invoked. Java is a stack-based language. TestClass.f = new TestClass(); consists of four action. First new instruction is called, its like malloc in C/C++, it allocates memory and places a reference to it on the top of the stack. Then reference is duplicated for invoking a constructor. Constructor in fact is like any other instance method, its invoked with the duplicated reference. Only after that reference is stored in the method frame or in the instance field and becomes accessible from anywhere else. Before the last step reference to the object is present only on the top of creating thread's stack and no body else can see it. In fact there is no difference what kind of field you are working with, both will be initialized if TestClass.f != null. You can read x and y fields from different objects, but this will not result in y = 0. For more information you should see JVM Specification and Stack-oriented programming language articles.

UPD: One important thing I forgot to mention. By java memory there is no way to see partially initialized object. If you do not do self publications inside constructor, sure.

JLS:

An object is considered to be completely initialized when its constructor finishes. A thread that can only see a reference to an object after that object has been completely initialized is guaranteed to see the correctly initialized values for that object's final fields.

JLS:

There is a happens-before edge from the end of a constructor of an object to the start of a finalizer for that object.

Broader explanation of this point of view:

It turns out that the end of an object's constructor happens-before the execution of its finalize method. In practice, what this means is that any writes that occur in the constructor must be finished and visible to any reads of the same variable in the finalizer, just as if those variables were volatile.

UPD: That was the theory, let's turn to practice.

Consider the following code, with simple non-final variables:

public class Test {

    int myVariable1;
    int myVariable2;

    Test() {
        myVariable1 = 32;
        myVariable2 = 64;
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) throws Exception {
        Test t = new Test();
        System.out.println(t.myVariable1 + t.myVariable2);
    }
}

The following command displays machine instructions generated by java, how to use it you can find in a wiki:

java.exe -XX:+UnlockDiagnosticVMOptions -XX:+PrintAssembly -Xcomp -XX:PrintAssemblyOptions=hsdis-print-bytes -XX:CompileCommand=print,*Test.main Test

It's output:

...
0x0263885d: movl   $0x20,0x8(%eax)    ;...c7400820 000000
                                    ;*putfield myVariable1
                                    ; - Test::<init>@7 (line 12)
                                    ; - Test::main@4 (line 17)
0x02638864: movl   $0x40,0xc(%eax)    ;...c7400c40 000000
                                    ;*putfield myVariable2
                                    ; - Test::<init>@13 (line 13)
                                    ; - Test::main@4 (line 17)
0x0263886b: nopl   0x0(%eax,%eax,1)   ;...0f1f4400 00
...

Field assignments are followed by NOPL instruction, one of it's purposes is to prevent instruction reordering.

Why does this happen? According to specification finalization happens after constructor returns. So GC thread cant see a partially initialized object. On a CPU level GC thread is not distinguished from any other thread. If such guaranties are provided to GC, than they are provided to any other thread. This is the most obvious solution to such restriction.

Results:

1) Constructor is not synchronized, synchronization is done by other instructions.

2) Assignment to object's reference cant happen before constructor returns.

share|improve this answer
3  
The fact java byte code is stack-oriented has nothing in common with the question. Bytecode is compiled in optimized machine's native code, which in turn has no sign of stack origin. –  Alexei Kaigorodov Mar 11 '13 at 17:15
2  
@Noofiz "By java memory model constructor invocation is synchronized. So there is no way to see partially initialized object." is plain wrong... –  assylias Mar 14 '13 at 8:20
2  
"JVM Specification rather clearly says that a partially initialized object can not be seen" => No it does not. The JLS guarantees that a final field will always be visible if the constructor does not let this escape, even the object is published via a data race. There is no such guarantee for non-final fields. –  assylias Mar 14 '13 at 9:36
2  
@Noofiz It only says what it says: an object can't be finalized before it is fully constructed - but finalization only happen when the object is garbage collected. That does not guarantee anything if you use the object after construction. –  assylias Mar 14 '13 at 10:06
2  
Your link (to a very good blog) does not prove that "constructor invocation is synchronized" - only that when the finalize() method runs, any writes made by the constructor will be made visible. It does not say anything about reads that happen before finalization. Actually you will note that Jemery says: "any writes that occur in the constructor must be finished and visible to any reads of the same variable in the finalizer, just as if those variables were volatile." - he implicitly refers to the fact that such a read would not be guaranteed to see the write outside the finalizer. –  assylias Mar 15 '13 at 14:57

What's going on in this thread? Why should that code fail in the first place?

You launch 1000s of threads that will each do the following:

TestClass.f = new TestClass();

What that does, in order:

  1. evaluate TestClass.f to find out its memory location
  2. evaluate new TestClass(): this creates a new instance of TestClass, whose constructor will initialize both x and y
  3. assign the right-hand value to the left-hand memory location

An assignment is an atomic operation which is always performed after the right-hand value has been generated. Here is a citation from the Java language spec (see the first bulleted point) but it really applies to any sane language.

This means that while the TestClass() constructor is taking its time to do its job, and x and y could conceivably still be zero, the reference to the partially initialized TestClass object only lives in that thread's stack, or CPU registers, and has not been written to TestClass.f

Therefore TestClass.f will always contain:

  • either null, at the start of your program, before anything else is assigned to it,
  • or a fully initialized TestClass instance.
share|improve this answer
1  
This definitely make sense to me. But the TestClass of the original poster is actually copied verbatim from the JLS, which do specify that the reader could see y as 0. –  Etienne Miret Mar 17 '13 at 17:14
2  
You are misunderstanding the situation - as soon as a program become multithreaded, most of the JLS becomes inapplicable. This is well summarised in Chapter 17.4‌​: The actions of each thread in isolation must behave as governed by the semantics of that thread, with the exception that the values seen by each read are determined by the memory model. –  assylias Mar 17 '13 at 18:17
1  
In other words, everything you say is correct if there is only one thread, but if there is more than one, all the reads of shared variables in reader are governed by Chapter 17 and most of your post does not apply. –  assylias Mar 17 '13 at 18:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.