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I've a piece of code:

using (StreamReader stream = new StreamReader(file.OpenRead(), Encoding))
{
    char[] buffer = new char[chunksize];
    while (stream.Peek() >= 0)
    {
       int readCount = stream.Read(buffer, 0, chunksize);

       yield return new string(buffer, 0, readCount);
    }
 }

Now i have to surround this with an try-catch block

try
{
   using (StreamReader stream = new StreamReader(file.OpenRead(), Encoding))
   {
       char[] buffer = new char[chunksize];
       while (stream.Peek() >= 0)
       {
          int readCount = stream.Read(buffer, 0, chunksize);

          yield return new string(buffer, 0, readCount);
       }
    } 
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    throw ExceptionMapper.Map(ex, file.FullName)
}

I can't see any way to do what i want.

EDIT The method has the signature

public IEnumerable<string> ReadPieces(int pieces)

I need a try catch with a call to the ExceptionMapper in the catch case. The method is used deferred by all callers.

The exceptions i have to catch are coming from these calls

File.OpenRead()
stream.Read()
share|improve this question
1  
Would be helpful if you would describe more detailed what you want to do. Obviously this approach does not work, so the code has to be changed. But how should we guess what your restrictions are? Exception handling is something you have to think about carefully. It's nothing which can just be added. –  Achim Feb 21 '11 at 14:40

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Because you want to keep the Stream open for the duration of the enumeration AND deal with exceptions AND properly close the file handle either way, I don't think you can use a regular enumeration shortcut (the iterator block, yield-return/yield-break).

Instead, just do what the compiler would have done for you and add some:

By implementing IEnumerator yourself, you can also add IDisposable

public class LazyStream : IEnumerable<string>, IDisposable
{
  LazyEnumerator le;

  public LazyStream(FileInfo file, Encoding encoding)
  {
    le = new LazyEnumerator(file, encoding);
  }

  #region IEnumerable<string> Members
  public IEnumerator<string> GetEnumerator()
  {
    return le;
  }
  #endregion

  #region IEnumerable Members
  System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
  {
    return le;
  }
  #endregion

  #region IDisposable Members
  private bool disposed = false;

  public void Dispose()
  {
    Dispose(true);

    GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
  }

  protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
  {
    if (!this.disposed)
    {
      if (disposing)
      {
        if (le != null) le.Dispose();
      }

      disposed = true;
    }
  }
  #endregion

  class LazyEnumerator : IEnumerator<string>, IDisposable
  {
    StreamReader streamReader;
    const int chunksize = 1024;
    char[] buffer = new char[chunksize];

    string current;

    public LazyEnumerator(FileInfo file, Encoding encoding)
    {
      try
      {
        streamReader = new StreamReader(file.OpenRead(), encoding);
      }
      catch
      {
        // Catch some generator related exception
      }
    }

    #region IEnumerator<string> Members
    public string Current
    {
      get { return current; }
    }
    #endregion

    #region IEnumerator Members
    object System.Collections.IEnumerator.Current
    {
      get { return current; }
    }

    public bool MoveNext()
    {
      try
      {
        if (streamReader.Peek() >= 0)
        {
          int readCount = streamReader.Read(buffer, 0, chunksize);

          current = new string(buffer, 0, readCount);

          return true;
        }
        else
        {
          return false;
        }
      }
      catch
      {
        // Trap some iteration error
      }
    }

    public void Reset()
    {
      throw new NotSupportedException();
    }
    #endregion

    #region IDisposable Members
    private bool disposed = false;

    public void Dispose()
    {
      Dispose(true);

      GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
      if (!this.disposed)
      {
        if (disposing)
        {
          if (streamReader != null) streamReader.Dispose();
        }

        disposed = true;
      }
    }
    #endregion
  }
}

I didn't test this, but I think it's close.

used like this:

using (var fe = new LazyStream(new FileInfo("c:\\data.log"), Encoding.ASCII))
{
  foreach (var chunk in fe)
  {
    Console.WriteLine(chunk);
  }
}

EDIT: I had totally forgotten to add the try-catch block placements. Oops.

share|improve this answer
    
Thats look like the way i can go. Wonderfull, great thanks. –  Khh Feb 22 '11 at 6:05
    
Very well done. =) –  Erik Forbes Feb 24 '11 at 18:22

Edit - this answer is actually incorrect, due to the reasons elaborated on in the comments - "ONLY the enumerator generation is wrapped, but not the iteration itself." - but I am leaving this answer here as an example of how sometimes what may appear to work does not due to the intricacies of the language.

Consider it a cautionary tale - my thanks to uosɐſ. =)


Here's an option - separate your method into two methods, one public and one private. The public method is a wrapper (with try/catch) around a call to the private method, which is your generator. For example:

public IEnumerable<string> YourFunction(...)
{
    try
    {
        return _yourFunction(...);
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        throw ExceptionMapper.Map(e, file.FullName);
    }
}

private IEnumerable<string> _yourFunction(...)
{
    // Your code here
}

This will allow your users to rely on the generator having built-in exception handling. Additionally you could perform more validation on your inputs in the public method, throwing any exceptions as needed due to bad inputs, and have those validations performed immediately when the method is called, rather than waiting for the first time the enumerable is enumerated.

share|improve this answer
3  
This is good and all true, but I think it's important to note for the reader that ONLY the enumerator generation is wrapped, but not the iteration itself. If the file is suddenly unavailable during iteration or cannot be opened in the first place, and exception will be thrown to the consuming code. If you try to open the stream in the generator, then you would have no chance to dispose of it properly at the end of its scope. –  uosɐſ Feb 22 '11 at 14:21
    
@uos - Ah, you're right. The imperative nature of the pre-compilation code in the private generator lulled me into believing that the try/catch in the wrapping method would handle exceptions thrown from the generator. I should have known better. =P –  Erik Forbes Feb 24 '11 at 18:20
    
Yes, I've fallen for this before :) the outer try will never catch because the IEnumerable is returned. Nothing is thrown until it is enumerated - which will not execute the wrapper method. –  Chad Schouggins May 29 at 19:52

You can't use yield constructs in a try/catch block. Restrict the try block to code that can throw, not all of it. If you are unable to do this, you are out of luck - you'll need to catch it further up the stack.

share|improve this answer

Take a look at this question. You can yield break in the exceptional case, yield value after the try/catch clause. I was concerned about performance, but there it is believed that try doesn't have a performance influence while no exceptions are thrown.

share|improve this answer

Here is a code snippet, which works for me (I did not reach the error condition).

while (true)
{
    T ret = null;
    try
    {
        if (!enumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            break;
        }
        ret = enumerator.Current;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        // handle the exception and end the iteration
        // probably you want it to re-throw it
        break;
    }
    // the yield statement is outside the try catch block
    yield return ret;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very good solution, helped us big time! tnx –  MaYaN Jun 30 at 13:48

Unfortunately you haven't described what it is you want to do, but you could try just forcing users of the function you're defining to try/catch themselves:

public IEnumerable<string> YourFunction(...)
{
    //Your code
}

//later:
    //...
    try{
        foreach( string s in YourFunction(file) )
        {
            //Do Work
        }
    }
    catch(Exception e){
        throw ExceptionMapper.Map(e, file.FullName);
    }
share|improve this answer

try this approach :

public IEnumerable<ReturnData> toto()
{
    using (StreamReader stream = new StreamReader(File.OpenRead(""), Encoding.UTF8))
    {
        char[] buffer = new char[1];
        while (stream.Peek() >= 0)
        {
            ReturnData result;
            try
            {
                int readCount = stream.Read(buffer, 0, 1);
                result = new ReturnData(new string(buffer, 0, readCount));
            }
            catch (Exception exc)
            {
                result = new ReturnData(exc);
            }
            yield return result;
        }
    }
}

public class ReturnData
{
    public string Data { get; private set; }
    public Exception Error { get; private set; }
    public bool HasError { get { return Error != null; } }
    public ReturnData(string data)
    {
        this.Data = data;
    }
    public ReturnData(Exception exc)
    {
        this.Error = exc;
    }
}

You just have to be careful with this approach: you will have to filter exceptions based on the severity. Some exceptions will have to stop the whole process, others just can be skipped and logged.

share|improve this answer
1  
throwing within the catch isn't the problem - you simply can't yield out of a try/catch block. It isn't allowed by the C# compiler. –  Erik Forbes Feb 21 '11 at 14:54
    
@Erik Forbes: updated... a bit quick to post –  Steve B Feb 21 '11 at 15:05
    
There could be an error opening the stream too that he's trying to catch. In order to handle that error separately while still disposing of the Stream, you can't use an iterator block at all. –  uosɐſ Feb 21 '11 at 15:14

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