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I have the Loop which generates tasks.

Code:

Task task = null;
foreach (Entity a in AAAA)
{
  // create the task 
  task = new Task(() => {
    myMethod(a);
  },  Token, TaskCreationOptions.None);
  task.Start();
}

As you can see in each iteration task object has new initialization (..new Task(() =>..) How can I know that all tasks done?

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up vote 23 down vote accepted

I f you replace this with a

 Parallel.ForEach(...,  () => myMethod(a), ...)

Then you get an automatic Wait on all tasks at the end of the ForEach.

And maybe run the ForEach from a separate Task.

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Beat me to it. Wish I could upvote several times. This is after all a good example of "don't reinvent the wheel" – Rune FS Feb 21 '11 at 15:07
3  
The thing is, there are some very real performance concerns/difference between a loop that creates tasks, and Parallel.ForEach. While they can be similar in many cases, they should not be blindly substituted for one another to solve unrelated problems. – Andrew Anderson Feb 23 '11 at 15:44
    
@Andrew, you are right. I just blinked over it because of the non-specific 'mymethod(a)` and lack of information about the circumstances. – Henk Holterman Feb 23 '11 at 15:57
var allTasks = new List<Task>();
foreach (Entity a in AAAA)
{
  // create the task 
  task = new Task(() => {
    myMethod(a);
  },  Token, TaskCreationOptions.None);

  // Add the tasks to a list
  allTasks.Add(task);
  task.Start();
}

// Wait until all tasks are completed.
Task.WaitAll(allTasks.ToArray());
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Neat - I think you'll need to type the list List<Task>, though, so that the .ToArray() generates an array of Tasks not objects – Rup Feb 21 '11 at 15:04
    
Thank it made sense! – Yara Feb 21 '11 at 15:20

You'll need to keep references to all the tasks created in the loop. Then you can use the Task.WaitAll method (see MSDN reference). You can either create an array and assign tasks to elements of the array (in C# 2.0) or you can use LINQ:

var tasks = 
   AAAA.Select((Entity a) => 
      Task.Factory.StartNew(() => { myMethod(a); },
         Token, TaskCreationOptions.None)).ToArray();
Task.WaitAll(tasks)

If you don't need to use tasks (explicitly) then Henk's suggestion to use Parallel.ForEach is probably a better option.

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