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I have a Javascript function with a namespace and I am using Prototype to execute a function. Example code:

GUI.Title = {
 initialise: function() {
  var elements = $$('a');

  this.show(); /* now it refers to the namespace */

  elements.each(function(element) {
   this.show(); /* this refers to the window object, not to the namespace */
  });

},
 show: function() {
  element.show();
 }
}

'this' refers to the namespace outside the each-function and inside the each it refers to the window.

Can someone explain to me how I can use 'this' in the each-loop as a referer to the namespace?

I am using Prototype.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Use Prototype's bind method to modify what this means inside the function.

elements.each(function(element) {
   this.show();
}.bind(this));
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2  
+1, because your answer is prototype specific. -- i edited my answer to indicate that my answer is more a general javascript way of doing it. –  hvgotcodes Feb 21 '11 at 16:43
2  
Note that in the future (not too far, I hope), this will be a valid "javascript way of doing it", bind is now part of the ECMAScript 5th Edition Spec. :) –  CMS Feb 21 '11 at 17:45
    
Many thanks, I knew about 'bind', but I did not know the syntax in relation to solve this issue! Now I know, thanks :) Sometimes the Prototype manual is a little bit hard to understand... –  Sander Feb 21 '11 at 19:40
    
@Sander you're not alone :) @CMS cool, I did not know that. –  Nick Feb 21 '11 at 20:25

replace

this.show(); /* now it refers to the namespace */

elements.each(function(element) {
   this.show(); /* this refers to the window object, not to the namespace */
});

with

var scope = this;
elements.each(function(element) {
   scope.show(); /* this refers to the window object, not to the namespace */
});

what you are doing is creating a closure, the 'scope' var gets 'closed-in' to your each function lexically. Note that this approach is not prototype specific, it's a general javascript technique.

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4  
This would work. Since Prototype is available, bind is a bit neater. Gave you an upvote since it's useful to anyone reading who isn't using Prototype. –  Nick Feb 21 '11 at 16:42
    
Thanks as well! –  Sander Feb 21 '11 at 19:41

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