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I am writing a simple application that uses Threads to increase the performance. The problem is, that this application runs fine on windows, using the 2 cores that my CPU has. But When I execute on Linux, It seems that only uses 1 Core.

I can't understand why this happens.

These is my code, C++:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <time.h>

void* function(void*)
{
    int i=0;
    for(i=0; i<1110111; i++)
        rand();
    return 0;
}

void withOutThreads(void)
{
    function(0);
    function(0);
}

void withThreads(void)
{
    pthread_t* h1 = new pthread_t;
    pthread_t* h2 = new pthread_t;
    pthread_attr_t* atr = new pthread_attr_t;

    pthread_attr_init(atr);
    pthread_attr_setscope(atr,PTHREAD_SCOPE_SYSTEM);

    pthread_create(h1,atr,function,0);
    pthread_create(h2,atr,function,0);

    pthread_join(*h1,0);
    pthread_join(*h2,0);
    pthread_attr_destroy(atr);
    delete h1;
    delete h2;
    delete atr;
}

int main(void)
{
    int ini,tim;
    ini = clock();
    withOutThreads();
    tim = (int) ( 1000*(clock()-ini)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC );
    printf("Time Sequential: %d ms\n",tim);
    fflush(stdout);

    ini = clock();
    withThreads();
    tim = (int) ( 1000*(clock()-ini)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC );
    printf("Time Concurrent: %d ms\n",tim);
    fflush(stdout);
    return 0;
}

Output on Linux:

Time Sequential: 50 ms
Time Concurrent: 1610 ms

Output on Windows:

Time Sequential: 50 ms
Time Concurrent: 30 ms
share|improve this question
    
minor nit: this doesn't look like c++ –  Sam Miller Feb 21 '11 at 17:17
1  
@Sam Miller: but it is valid C++ though. –  rubenvb Feb 21 '11 at 17:58
    
This question's title does not describe the question. In addition "uses Threads to increase performance" potentially signifies a red herring. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 1 '11 at 18:19
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3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

clock() works different on windows vs linux, so don't use that to measure time. On linux it measures CPU time, on windows it measures wall clock time. Ideally these would be the same in this test case, but you should use something consistant between the platforms to measure the time. e.g. gettimeofday()

rand() serializes your threads on linux. rand() holds an internal lock as to be thread safe. The rand() manpage states rand() is not threadsafe nor reentrant, however at least the code in recent glibc aquires a lock around the call. I'm not sure how windows handles this, either it's not thread safe at all, or it uses thread local variables.

Use rand_r on linux, or find some better CPU utilization function to measure.

void* function(void*)
{
    unsigned int seed = 42;
    int i=0;
    for(i=0; i<1110111; i++)
        rand_r(&seed);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
And when it measures CPU time on Linux it measures it across all the threads in the program. –  Zan Lynx Feb 21 '11 at 18:51
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The problem is that Linux multi-threaded version or rand() locks a mutex. Change your function to:

void* function(void*)
{
    int i=0;
    unsigned rand_state = 0;
    for(i=0; i<1110111; i++)
        rand_r(&rand_state);
    return 0;
}

Output:

Time Sequential: 10 ms
Time Concurrent: 10 ms
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That sounds like an OS scheduler implementation to me. Not per se a problem in your code. The OS decides which thread will run on what core and if the rules of thread/CPU affinity are adhered to, it will stick that thread on the same CPU each time.

That is a simple explanation for a fairly complex subject.

share|improve this answer
1  
Simple and incorrect. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Feb 21 '11 at 17:06
    
How is it incorrect? There is no "problem" here. The OS is free to run threads wherever it likes. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 1 '11 at 18:20
    
I think the point is, whilst the OS is free to run all the threads on just one core and nuke the potential performance, the use of rand() appears to be some thing that will cause problems. –  thecoshman Nov 16 '12 at 14:08
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