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How can I calculate next dates using Java?

For example, if the user gives me the current date in a field like 2011-02-21, then I want to give back the same day of the month for the next two months: 2011-03-21, 2011-04-21.

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What do you mean by "month by month"? Can you please provide sample data? –  The Scrum Meister Feb 21 '11 at 19:20
4  
joda-time ..... –  Bozho Feb 21 '11 at 19:20
    
Next five date what ? Sounds ambiguous –  Chuck Birkin Feb 21 '11 at 19:21
    
excuse me, i was some fuzzy. Example user give me the current date in a field like 20110221 and i will give back him next two months 20110321, 20110421. –  ulima69 Feb 21 '11 at 19:22
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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using Joda-Time:

    DateTime dt = new DateTime(2005, 3, 26, 0, 0, 0, 0);

    Period everyMonth= Period.months(1);

    DateTime dt1 = dt.plus(everyMonth);
    DateTime dt2 = dt1.plus(everyMonth);
    DateTime dt3 = dt2.plus(everyMonth);
    DateTime dt4 = dt3.plus(everyMonth);
    DateTime dt5 = dt4.plus(everyMonth);

    System.out.println(dt.toDate());
    System.out.println(dt1.toDate());
    System.out.println(dt2.toDate());
    System.out.println(dt3.toDate());
    System.out.println(dt4.toDate());
    System.out.println(dt5.toDate());

OUTPUT

Sat Mar 26 00:00:00 CST 2005
Tue Apr 26 00:00:00 CDT 2005
Thu May 26 00:00:00 CDT 2005
Sun Jun 26 00:00:00 CDT 2005
Tue Jul 26 00:00:00 CDT 2005
Fri Aug 26 00:00:00 CDT 2005
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-1 Regular Java is capable to do this simple task. –  RealHowTo Feb 22 '11 at 0:57
    
I agree with @RealHowTo. There's no point in using an external library for something so simple. –  user238033 Feb 24 '11 at 8:36
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How about using DateTime of YodaTime?

new DateTime().plusDays(nDays)?

See also plusMonths()

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Use Calendar.add(...)

Here is the example:

    Calendar c = Calendar.getInstance();
    c.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, 31);
    c.set(Calendar.MONTH, Calendar.DECEMBER);
    System.out.println(c.getTime());


    c.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR, 1);
    System.out.println(c.getTime());

This prints:

Sat Dec 31 21:25:12 IST 2011
Sun Jan 01 21:25:12 IST 2012

(I just wanted to check that this really gives correct result when the next date is in the next year.)

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Using Calendar like @AlexR said, you can use the add(...) method to add a point in the date.

This:

Calendar c = Calendar.getInstance();
c.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, 21);
c.set(Calendar.MONTH, Calendar.FEBRUARY);
System.out.println("user entered date:");
System.out.println(c.getTime());
System.out.println();
System.out.println("next five months:");
for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
    c.add(Calendar.MONTH, 1);
    System.out.println(c.getTime());
}

Prints out:

user entered date:
Mon Feb 21 15:56:49 EST 2011

next five months:
Mon Mar 21 15:56:49 EDT 2011
Thu Apr 21 15:56:49 EDT 2011
Sat May 21 15:56:49 EDT 2011
Tue Jun 21 15:56:49 EDT 2011
Thu Jul 21 15:56:49 EDT 2011
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Take a look at the Java Calendar, in particular the method add.

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AlexR just said it! –  fastcodejava Feb 21 '11 at 19:29
    
Not to be petty, but if you check the time I said it first ;-P –  Kurt Kaylor Feb 21 '11 at 19:37
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