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So I am new to ASP.NET MVC and I would like to create a view with a text box for each item in a collection. How do I do this, and how do I capture the information when it POSTs back? I have used forms and form elements to build static forms for a model, but never dynamically generated form elements based on a variable size collection.

I want to do something like this in mvc 3:

@foreach (Guest guest in Model.Guests)
{
    <div>
        First Name:<br />
        @Html.TextBoxFor(???) @* I can't do x => x.FirstName here because
                                 the model is of custom type Invite, and the
                                 lambda wants to expose properties for that
                                 type, and not the Guest in the foreach loop. *@
    </div>
}

How do I do a text box for each guest? And how do I capture them in the action method that it posts back to?

Thanks for any help.

share|improve this question
    
Can you show us how the Guest class looks like? And what is Model.Guests? List<Guest> ? –  ajma Feb 21 '11 at 19:42
    
The guest class is dymaically generated by entity framework. Just has some properties on it such as FirstName, LastName, Id, InviteId, etc –  Alex Ford Feb 21 '11 at 19:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Definitely a job for an editor template. So in your view you put this single line:

@Html.EditorFor(x => x.Guests)

and inside the corresponding editor template (~/Views/Shared/EditorTemplates/Guest.cshtml)

@model AppName.Models.Guest
<div>
    First Name:<br />
    @Html.TextBoxFor(x => x.FirstName)
</div>

And that's about all.

Now the following actions will work out of the box:

public ActionResult Index(int id)
{
    SomeViewModel model = ...
    return View(model);
}

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Index(SomeViewModel model)
{
    if (!ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        return View(model);
    }
    // TODO: do something with the model your got from the view
    return RedirectToAction("Success");
}

Note that the name of the editor template is important. If the property in your view model is:

public IEnumerable<Guest> Guests { get; set; }

the editor template should be called Guest.cshtml. It will automatically be invoked for each element of the Guests collection and it will take care of properly generating ids and names of your inputs so that when you POST back everything works automatically.

Conclusion: everytime you write a loop (for or foreach) inside an ASP.NET MVC view you should know that you are doing it wrong and that there is a better way.

share|improve this answer
    
What if I want a different editor for different areas? i.e. I want a different editor for Guest in the admin section, with more options than the editor for Guest in the public secion. –  Alex Ford Feb 21 '11 at 22:38
    
Nevermind. Html.EditorFor() has an overload with editor name. Thanks for the help! –  Alex Ford Feb 21 '11 at 22:39
    
@Chevex, then in the Admin section provide the corresponding editor template: ~/Areas/Admin/Views/Shared/EditorTemplates/Guest.cshtml. –  Darin Dimitrov Feb 21 '11 at 22:39
    
@Chevex, no, try to avoid this overload. Use conventions instead. It's better and most developers should already be familiar with conventions. –  Darin Dimitrov Feb 21 '11 at 22:40
    
Gotcha thanks for the help. I am now having a different issue. Maybe you can help? I have created another question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/5072905/… –  Alex Ford Feb 22 '11 at 0:42

You can do this:

@for (int i = 0; i < Model.Guests.Count; i++) {
  @Html.TextBoxFor(m => m.Guests.ToList()[i].FirstName)
}

There are more examples and details on this post by Haacked.

UPDATE: The controller post action should look like this:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Index(Room room)
{
    return View();
}

In this example I'm considering that you have a Room class like this:

public class Room
{
    public List<Guest> Guests { get; set; }
}

That's all, on the post action, you should have the Guests list correctly populated.

share|improve this answer
    
I like! Mind showing me how to capture this on the other side in the action method after the POST? –  Alex Ford Feb 21 '11 at 19:44
    
Read up on model binding. It's easier than you think. encrypted.google.com/… –  Daniel Schaffer Feb 21 '11 at 19:46
    
Updated. By the way, the post I linked above had this answer. –  oenning Feb 21 '11 at 19:59

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