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You'd take images and mark specific points (for example, mark the region around the eyes, nose, mouth etc of people) and then transform them into the points marked into another image. Something like:

transform(original_image, marked_points_in_the_original, marked_points_in_the_reference)

I can't seem to find an algorithm describing it, nor can I find any libraries with it. I'm willing to do it myself too, as long as I can find good/easy to follow material on it. I know it's possible though since I've seen some incomplete (don't really explain how to do it) .pdfs on google with it.

Here's an example of the marked points and the transformation, since you asked for clarification. Though this one isn't using 2 people as I said earlier.

http://i.stack.imgur.com/KgeJg.jpg
http://i.stack.imgur.com/biwnH.jpg

Edit: I managed to get the im.transform method working, but the argument is a list of ((box_x, box_y, box_width, box_height), (x0, y0, x1, y1, x2, y2, x3, y3)), with the first point being NW, the second SW, the third NE and the fourth SE. (0, 0) is the leftmost upper part of the screen as far as I could tell. If I did everything right, then this method doesn't really do what I need.

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"transform" is a vague word. Can you explain what you mean? Do you want to copy parts of one image and "paste" them directly into another? What kind of region? – Devin Jeanpierre Feb 21 '11 at 20:49

On a similar note, you could use ImageMagick's Python API to do Shepards's Distortion.

koala ears koala ears pull

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This seems similar to what I'm trying to do. I'll give it a try and report back if I manage to get it working. – smln Feb 21 '11 at 21:12
    
ImageMagick works, but the results I got weren't as good as I had hoped. – smln Feb 22 '11 at 17:41
    
Same here. Images are getting blurred. What u used then??? – DivineDesert Aug 23 '11 at 5:02
    
this works pretty well for creating animated gifs. i applied gradual shepard's distortions with changing alpha for two images and the result looks like this: i.imgur.com/1Lh4i.gif thanks for the tip! – Murat Ayfer Dec 11 '11 at 23:34
1  
@GeorgeProfenza in fact here is the final product :) muratayfer.com/morphin all thanks to this thread. – Murat Ayfer Jan 2 '12 at 15:43

Yep, there is. It's a bit low-level, but PIL (the Python Imaging Library) has a function to do this sort of transformation. I've never really had it work for me (as my problem was a bit simpler), but you can play with it.

Here's a good resource for the PIL transformations (you'd want to look at MESH): http://effbot.org/tag/PIL.Image.Image.transform.


From the documentation:

Similar to QUAD, but data is a list of target rectangles and corresponding source quadrilaterals.

im.transform(size, MESH, data)

Data is a tuple of rectangles:

data = [((a, b, c, d), (e, f, g, h)), 
        ((i, j, k, l), (m, n, o, p))]

It transforms the first rectangle into the second.

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I've read that documentation before but I don't understand what goes in that function. Could you explain its parameters? If I'm reading it correctly, all I have to do is create a map with the original coordinates -> new coordinates and pass it as a MESH and it works? – smln Feb 21 '11 at 21:11
    
More or less. The mesh has to consist of pairs of rectangles, but you can make degenerate 1x1 rectangles. The larger the size, the faster it goes. – Blender Feb 21 '11 at 21:15

Sample code given by Blender doesn't work for me. Also, the PIL documentation for im.transform is ambiguous. So I dig into the PIL source code and finally figure out how to use the interface. Here's my complete usage:

import numpy as np
from PIL import Image

def quad_as_rect(quad):
    if quad[0] != quad[2]: return False
    if quad[1] != quad[7]: return False
    if quad[4] != quad[6]: return False
    if quad[3] != quad[5]: return False
    return True

def quad_to_rect(quad):
    assert(len(quad) == 8)
    assert(quad_as_rect(quad))
    return (quad[0], quad[1], quad[4], quad[3])

def rect_to_quad(rect):
    assert(len(rect) == 4)
    return (rect[0], rect[1], rect[0], rect[3], rect[2], rect[3], rect[2], rect[1])

def shape_to_rect(shape):
    assert(len(shape) == 2)
    return (0, 0, shape[0], shape[1])

def griddify(rect, w_div, h_div):
    w = rect[2] - rect[0]
    h = rect[3] - rect[1]
    x_step = w / float(w_div)
    y_step = h / float(h_div)
    y = rect[1]
    grid_vertex_matrix = []
    for _ in range(h_div + 1):
        grid_vertex_matrix.append([])
        x = rect[0]
        for _ in range(w_div + 1):
            grid_vertex_matrix[-1].append([int(x), int(y)])
            x += x_step
        y += y_step
    grid = np.array(grid_vertex_matrix)
    return grid

def distort_grid(org_grid, max_shift):
    new_grid = np.copy(org_grid)
    x_min = np.min(new_grid[:, :, 0])
    y_min = np.min(new_grid[:, :, 1])
    x_max = np.max(new_grid[:, :, 0])
    y_max = np.max(new_grid[:, :, 1])
    new_grid += np.random.randint(- max_shift, max_shift + 1, new_grid.shape)
    new_grid[:, :, 0] = np.maximum(x_min, new_grid[:, :, 0])
    new_grid[:, :, 1] = np.maximum(y_min, new_grid[:, :, 1])
    new_grid[:, :, 0] = np.minimum(x_max, new_grid[:, :, 0])
    new_grid[:, :, 1] = np.minimum(y_max, new_grid[:, :, 1])
    return new_grid

def grid_to_mesh(src_grid, dst_grid):
    assert(src_grid.shape == dst_grid.shape)
    mesh = []
    for i in range(src_grid.shape[0] - 1):
        for j in range(src_grid.shape[1] - 1):
            src_quad = [src_grid[i    , j    , 0], src_grid[i    , j    , 1],
                        src_grid[i + 1, j    , 0], src_grid[i + 1, j    , 1],
                        src_grid[i + 1, j + 1, 0], src_grid[i + 1, j + 1, 1],
                        src_grid[i    , j + 1, 0], src_grid[i    , j + 1, 1]]
            dst_quad = [dst_grid[i    , j    , 0], dst_grid[i    , j    , 1],
                        dst_grid[i + 1, j    , 0], dst_grid[i + 1, j    , 1],
                        dst_grid[i + 1, j + 1, 0], dst_grid[i + 1, j + 1, 1],
                        dst_grid[i    , j + 1, 0], dst_grid[i    , j + 1, 1]]
            dst_rect = quad_to_rect(dst_quad)
            mesh.append([dst_rect, src_quad])
    return mesh

im = Image.open('./old_driver/data/train/c0/img_292.jpg')
dst_grid = griddify(shape_to_rect(im.size), 4, 4)
src_grid = distort_grid(dst_grid, 50)
mesh = grid_to_mesh(src_grid, dst_grid)
im = im.transform(im.size, Image.MESH, mesh)
im.show()

Before: enter image description here After: enter image description here

I suggest executing above code in iPython then print out mesh to understand what kind of input is needed for im.transform. For me the output is:

In [1]: mesh
Out[1]:
[[(0, 0, 160, 120), [0, 29, 29, 102, 186, 120, 146, 0]],
 [(160, 0, 320, 120), [146, 0, 186, 120, 327, 127, 298, 48]],
 [(320, 0, 480, 120), [298, 48, 327, 127, 463, 77, 492, 26]],
 [(480, 0, 640, 120), [492, 26, 463, 77, 640, 80, 605, 0]],
 [(0, 120, 160, 240), [29, 102, 9, 241, 162, 245, 186, 120]],
 [(160, 120, 320, 240), [186, 120, 162, 245, 339, 214, 327, 127]],
 [(320, 120, 480, 240), [327, 127, 339, 214, 513, 284, 463, 77]],
 [(480, 120, 640, 240), [463, 77, 513, 284, 607, 194, 640, 80]],
 [(0, 240, 160, 360), [9, 241, 27, 364, 202, 365, 162, 245]],
 [(160, 240, 320, 360), [162, 245, 202, 365, 363, 315, 339, 214]],
 [(320, 240, 480, 360), [339, 214, 363, 315, 453, 373, 513, 284]],
 [(480, 240, 640, 360), [513, 284, 453, 373, 640, 319, 607, 194]],
 [(0, 360, 160, 480), [27, 364, 33, 478, 133, 480, 202, 365]],
 [(160, 360, 320, 480), [202, 365, 133, 480, 275, 480, 363, 315]],
 [(320, 360, 480, 480), [363, 315, 275, 480, 434, 469, 453, 373]],
 [(480, 360, 640, 480), [453, 373, 434, 469, 640, 462, 640, 319]]]
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