Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am about to remove duplicates from my database using

delete from table 
  where id not in (
    select min(id) 
      from table 
      group by foreign_key);

However, I would like to do so with the following conditions:

  • if any of the duplicate rows have a value in fieldA or fieldB
    • if any of the duplicates have a value for fieldA or fieldB, but there is only one unique value in each field, keep that value
    • if there is more than one unique value in each row, report this information along with the id and foreign_key so that the value can be fixed manually.

By default, fieldA and fieldB are NULL, but data have been entered in these fields in some cases.

Here is some sample data:

| id | foreign_key | fieldA | fieldB |
|----+-------------+--------+--------|
|  1 |           1 | NULL   | NULL   |
|  2 |           1 | A1     | B1     |
|  3 |           1 | NULL   | NULL   |
|  4 |           2 | A2     | B2     |
|  5 |           2 | A3     | B2     |
|  6 |           3 | NULL   | NULL   |
|  7 |           4 | A4     | B4     |
|  8 |           5 | A5     | NULL   |
|  9 |           5 | NULL   | B5     |
| 10 |           6 | A6     | B6     |
| 11 |           6 | A7     | B6     |
| 12 |           7 | NULL   | B7     |
| 13 |           7 | NULL   | B7     |

What I want to keep is:

| id | foreign_key | fieldA | fieldB |
|----+-------------+--------+--------|
|  2 |           1 | A1     | B1     |
|  4 |           2 | NULL   | B2     |
|  6 |           3 | NULL   | NULL   |
|  7 |           4 | A4     | B4     |
|  8 |           5 | A5     | B5     |
| 10 |           6 | NULL   | B6     |
| 12 |           7 | NULL   | B7     |

And I would like this information to be returned:

foreign_key 2 has two distinct values of fieldA: A2 and A3
share|improve this question
    
Would you provide sample data for the table and what should be removed? –  outis Feb 21 '11 at 22:12
    
@outis I have included sample data. for it is not necessary that the row with id=4 be returned, only that foreign_key=2 is identified as having > 1 result for fieldA. –  David Feb 21 '11 at 22:22
    
The sample doesn't make sense. There's only one row with foreign_key=2, and no fieldA stores 'A2' or 'A3'. –  outis Feb 21 '11 at 22:24
    
@outis sorry, I forgot to paste one the starting table –  David Feb 21 '11 at 22:28
    
Do you need to have id=2 for the row with fieldA='A1' and fieldB='B1', or could it have the ID of any row where foreign_key=1? –  outis Feb 21 '11 at 23:34
show 5 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've got to run of right now, but here's a query to start with:

SELECT id, foreign_key, 
    group_concat(DISTINCT fieldA) as A, count(DISTINCT fieldA) as `#A`,
    group_concat(DISTINCT fieldB) as B, count(DISTINCT fieldB) as `#B`
  FROM t1
  GROUP BY foreign_key
;

On the test data, this returns:

| id | foreign_key | A     | #A | B    | #B |
+----+-------------+-------+----+------+----+
|  1 |           1 | A1    |  1 | B1   |  1 |
|  4 |           2 | A2,A3 |  2 | B2   |  1 |
|  6 |           3 | NULL  |  0 | NULL |  0 |
|  7 |           4 | A4    |  1 | B4   |  1 |
|  8 |           5 | A5    |  1 | B5   |  1 |
| 10 |           6 | A6,A7 |  2 | B6   |  1 |
| 12 |           7 | NULL  |  0 | B7   |  1 |

Query for rows to keep:

SELECT id, foreign_key, 
    group_concat(DISTINCT fieldA) as A, count(DISTINCT fieldA) as `#A`, 
    group_concat(DISTINCT fieldB) as B, count(DISTINCT fieldB) as `#B`
  FROM t1
  GROUP BY foreign_key
  HAVING `#A` < 2 AND `#B` < 2
;

Query for rows that need operator intervention:

SELECT id, foreign_key, 
    group_concat(DISTINCT fieldA) as A, count(DISTINCT fieldA) as `#A`, 
    group_concat(DISTINCT fieldB) as B, count(DISTINCT fieldB) as `#B`
  FROM t1
  GROUP BY foreign_key
  HAVING `#A` >= 2 OR `#B` >= 2
;

GROUP_CONCAT may not be suitable, depending on the format of data stored in the columns. In combination with #A and #B, however, you could detect when it's not suitable, so it shouldn't be a big problem. It may also have too big a performance impact, but I can't think of another aggregate function that could be used in the same way (a GROUP_COALESCE would be nice).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.