Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have been looking at this code for a comparator. My question is there a specific benefit of initializing the two private variables inside the constructor(Done here in the default constructor). I know the second constructor can be used to create an instance with supplied values. What difference would it make if I do

private String sortBy = COLUMN_LAST_NAME;
private boolean ascending = true; 

I apologize if its a real simple and generic question.

public class CustomComparator implements Comparator<StudentList>
{   private String sortBy;
private boolean ascending;

public CustomComparator()
{
    sortBy = COLUMN_LAST_NAME;
    ascending = true;
}

public CustomComparator(String sortBy, boolean ascending)
{
    this.sortBy = sortBy;
    this.ascending = ascending;
}
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Actually it matters if you care about object immutability (and you should :-)). If both of your fields are final, you must initialize them like this:

public class CustomComparator implements Comparator<StudentList> {
    private final String sortBy;
    private final boolean ascending;

    public CustomComparator() {
        sortBy = COLUMN_LAST_NAME;
        ascending = true;
    }

    public CustomComparator(String sortBy, boolean ascending) {
        this.sortBy = sortBy;
        this.ascending = ascending;
    }
}

Or even better:

public class CustomComparator implements Comparator<StudentList> {
    private final String sortBy;
    private final boolean ascending;

    public CustomComparator() {
        this(COLUMN_LAST_NAME, true);
    }

    public CustomComparator(String sortBy, boolean ascending) {
        this.sortBy = sortBy;
        this.ascending = ascending;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Tomasz, if I do private final boolean ascending = true; outside the constructor, How would that affect object immutability? –  t0mcat Feb 21 '11 at 21:05
    
@t0mcat To the point that the parametric constructor cannot be used at all. –  Johan Sjöberg Feb 21 '11 at 21:07
    
@t0mcat: Because once assigned final value cannot be changed in constructor or any other place (exactly once semantic) –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Feb 21 '11 at 21:11
2  
final fields can be assigned only one time. If you assign the value outside the constructor then you cannot assign any new value. Think on final fields like photos, you cannot asign any new value –  Franco Feb 21 '11 at 21:13
    
@ Franco, @ Tomasz .. Thanks :) –  t0mcat Feb 21 '11 at 21:46

The best practice i've seen preached everywhere is have one constructor that takes all parameters, even if it means it has to be private, and then just call it from other constructors using this(..,..,...) while supplying appropriate values.

This will make you reuse as much code as possible and future fixes go to one place and one place only - no need to make double maintenance of code.

Your example would look like this:

public class CustomComparator implements Comparator<StudentList> {
    private String sortBy;
    private boolean ascending;

    public CustomComparator()
    {
        this(COLUMN_LAST_NAME, true);
    }

    public CustomComparator(String sortBy, boolean ascending)
    {
        this.sortBy = sortBy;
        this.ascending = ascending;
    }
}

Initialization is generally accepted to be in the constructor as to distinguish easier between static initialization of static members and per-instance init of instance variables. There is no performance difference.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks pnt..... –  t0mcat Feb 21 '11 at 21:03
    
If you don't want to clutter your constructors with initialisation of your private variables, e.g. because they are independent of outside code (assume sortBy is already initialized to the same value independent of the used constructor) and they can't be assigned in a short one liner you could use initializer blocks. –  Voo Feb 21 '11 at 21:30

it's all about what you need, both constructor are good choices, obviuosly if you want to initialize the fields is the best choice but think if you use this class like an Entity on Hibernate or like a bean on Spring framework, if you dont write the empty constructor nothing will run fine...

if you think in DTO patterns, declaring inmutable fields like @Tomasz Nurkiewicz says then the parametrized constructor is the only choice....

but like i say before, it depends on requeriments...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Franco, that cleared a lot :) –  t0mcat Feb 21 '11 at 21:08

I can't think of any difference and I prefer initializing in the variable declaration.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi carlosZ, I am a newbie so even these sort of simple declarations makes me wonder if I am missing something :-) –  t0mcat Feb 21 '11 at 21:02
    
Yeah, I think it's for of a matter of style... –  CarlosZ Feb 21 '11 at 21:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.