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This question mentions the Enumerator::Yielder#yield method. I haven't used it before, and I'm wondering under what circumstances it would be useful.

Is it mainly useful when you want to create an infinite list of items, such as the Sieve of Eratosthenes, and when you need to use an external iterator?

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3 Answers 3

It seems to be useful when you have multiple objects you want to enumerate over, but flat_map isn't suitable, and you want to chain the enumeration with another action:

module Enumerable
  def count_by
    items_grouped_by_criteria = group_by {|object| yield object}
    counts = items_grouped_by_criteria.map{|key, array| [key, array.length]}
    Hash[counts]
  end
end

def calculate_letter_frequencies
  each_letter.count_by {|letter| letter}
end

def each_letter
  filenames = ["doc/Quickstart", "doc/Coding style"]
  # Joining the text of each file into a single string would be memory-intensive
  enumerator = Enumerator.new do |yielder|
    filenames.each do |filename|
      text = File.read(filename)
      text.chars.each {|letter| yielder.yield(letter)}
    end
  end
  enumerator
end

calculate_letter_frequencies
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Since Mladen mentioned getting other answers, I thought I would give an example of something I just did earlier today. I'm writing an application that will receive data from multiple physical devices, analyze the data, and connect related data (that we see from multiple devices). This is a long-running application, and if I never threw away data (say, at least a day old with no updates), then it would grow infinitely large.

I've only been learning Ruby for about 7-8 months, so in the past, I would have done something like this:

delete_old_stuff if rand(300) == 0

and accomplish this using random numbers. However, this is not purely deterministic. I know that it will run approximately once every 300 evaluations (i.e. seconds), but it won't be exactly once every 300 times.

What I wrote up earlier looks like this:

counter = Enumerator.new do |y|
  a = (0..300)
  loop do
    a.each do |b|
      y.yield b
    end
    delete_old_stuff
  end
end

and I can replace delete_old_stuff if rand(300) == 0 with counter.next

Now, I'm sure there is a 1) more efficient or 2) pre-made way of doing this, but being sparked to play with Enumerator::Yielder#yield by your question and the linked question, this is what I came up with.

(and obviously, if you see a way to improve this or anything, let me know! I want to learn as much as I can)

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Certainly interesting use of Enumerator. Only thing that bothers me is that counter.next is not really visually suggesting what actually happens and what it's been used for. BTW, for demonstration, I wrapped your approach, along with another two (but for the exact same purpose) here: ideone.com/g1Jgp - performing some code every nth time in an iteration using Enumerator, OO and functional approach. I love Ruby. :) –  Mladen Jablanović Feb 26 '11 at 22:35
    
@Mladen Yeah, the counter.next kind of bothered me too, but it worked. Thank you for posting that demonstration, it's very interesting (and made me realize a couple obvious improvements to my version anyways!) –  phoffer Feb 26 '11 at 23:33

Although it's pretty handy for constructing infinite lists and lazy iterators, my favourite usage is wrapping an existing Enumerable with additional functionality (any enumerable, without needing to know what it really is, whether it's infinite or not etc).

Trivial example would be implementing each_with_index method (or, more generally, with_index method):

module Enumerable
  def my_with_index
    Enumerator.new do |yielder|
      i = 0
      self.each do |e|
        yielder.yield e, i
        i += 1
      end
    end
  end

  def my_each_with_index
    self.my_with_index.each do |e, i|
      yield e, i
    end
  end
end

[:foo, :bar, :baz].my_each_with_index do |e,i|
  puts "#{i}: #{e}"
end
#=>0: foo
#=>1: bar
#=>2: baz

Let's now extend to something not already implemented in corelib :), such as cyclically assigning value from a given array to each enumerable element (say, for colouring table rows):

module Enumerable
  def with_cycle values
    Enumerator.new do |yielder|
      self.each do |e|
        v = values.shift
        yielder.yield e, v
        values.push v
      end
    end
  end
end

p (1..10).with_cycle([:red, :green, :blue]).to_a # works with any Enumerable, such as Range
#=>[[1, :red], [2, :green], [3, :blue], [4, :red], [5, :green], [6, :blue], [7, :red], [8, :green], [9, :blue], [10, :red]]

The whole point is that these methods return Enumerator, which you then combine with usual Enumerable methods, such as select, map, inject etc.

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As it happens, that's the same as (1..10).zip([:red, :green, :blue].cycle), but it's still a good example nonetheless. +1 from me! –  Jörg W Mittag Feb 22 '11 at 2:09
    
@Joerg: This answer currently has +0 and -0 votes. Was that a metaphorical +1? (As far as I can tell, you haven't earned the electorate badge, so you can't be out of votes) –  Andrew Grimm Feb 22 '11 at 2:35
    
@Joerg: Not sure that it's completely the same (although in this case gives the same result, of course): zip unwinds the enumerable and always returns an array. Try something like large_file.lines.zip([:r,:g,:b].cycle) as opposed to large_file.lines.with_cycle([:r,:g,:b]) for comparison. –  Mladen Jablanović Feb 22 '11 at 8:16
    
I'll probably try doing the same without the yield method as a control, before accepting this as an answer. –  Andrew Grimm Feb 22 '11 at 22:25
    
I'd offer a bounty, it would be a pity if you get no other answers. –  Mladen Jablanović Feb 22 '11 at 22:53

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