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I have a utility function that will shuffle the elements of any Vector, but which generates generic warnings about using raw types.

static public void shuffle(Random r,Vector v)
   {    int sz = v.size();
        for(int pass = 0;pass<4;pass++)
        {   for(int i=0;i<sz;i++)
            { int j=nextInt(r,sz);
              Object ii = v.elementAt(i);
              v.setElementAt(v.elementAt(j),i);
              v.setElementAt(ii,j);
            }
        }
  }

there seems to be no way to quiet the warnings other than by suppressing them. Changing the method signature to Vector<Object> restricts the callers Vector<Object>. Changing to Vector<?> makes the setElementAt uncompilable.

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4  
critique: it would be better to use List: 1. Vector is an older collection, updated to use the favored List interface 2. Coding to the interface, rather than the class is more flexible –  akf Feb 21 '11 at 22:39
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As pointed out already, you can do this with generics like so:

public static <T> void privateShuffle(Random r, Vector<T> v) {
    int sz = v.size();
    for (int pass = 0; pass < 4; pass++) {
        for (int i = 0; i < sz; i++) {
            int j=nextInt(r,sz);
            T ii = v.elementAt(i);
            v.setElementAt(v.elementAt(j), i);
            v.setElementAt(ii, j);
        }
    }
}

However, since you're writing a utility method I'd prefer the ? wildcard syntax - it's a lot cleaner to look at. As you've already noted, you can't use the following header directly on that method, but I'd be tempted to do something like the following:

public static void shuffle(Random r, Vector<?> v) {
    privateShuffle(r, v);
}

private static <T> void privateShuffle(Random r, Vector<T> v) {
    int sz = v.size();
    for (int pass = 0; pass < 4; pass++) {
        for (int i = 0; i < sz; i++) {
            int j=nextInt(r,sz);
            T ii = v.elementAt(i);
            v.setElementAt(v.elementAt(j), i);
            v.setElementAt(ii, j);
        }
    }
}

Yes, it's an extra method, but that way you get to expose the "clean API" look of the unbounded wildcard whilst still maintaining the type safety (this is how a lot of the Java API methods work.)

As a side note, I'd also re-iterate that unless you're doing this for legacy reasons, Vector is generally considered an obsolete collection these days and a much better choice would be to use a list (and code to the list interface.)

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Thanks. that static <T> syntax is the magic I was looking for. –  ddyer Feb 23 '11 at 4:09
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First you should note that you're reinventing the wheel.

Collections.shuffle(yourVector, yourRandom);

does the trick :-)


To make your method generic for all types of Vectors, this is the way to write it:

static public <T> void shuffle(Random r, Vector<T> v) {
    int sz = v.size();
    for (int pass = 0; pass < 4; pass++) {
        for (int i = 0; i < sz; i++) {
            int j = nextInt(r, sz);
            T ii = v.elementAt(i);
            v.setElementAt(v.elementAt(j), i);
            v.setElementAt(ii, j);
        }
    }
},
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It is worth noting that Collections.shuffle results in a uniform distribution over all permutations (assuming Random to be perfectly random), but the home-grown method does not. –  meriton Feb 21 '11 at 22:44
    
actually, this code has been around so long that collections is reinventing my wheel. but I"m just upgrading the neighborhood to use generics. –  ddyer Feb 21 '11 at 22:47
    
Hehe, ok. If it's legacy code and you can't remove your shuffle routine, and you want a "good shuffle" I still suggest you just implement it as a wrapper call to Collections.shuffle. –  aioobe Feb 21 '11 at 22:50
    
Making it a wrapper is a good idea in this particular case. I'm interested in the general case. A similar wart is that you can't write Vector<String>[] = new Vector[2]; without a warning to suppress. –  ddyer Feb 21 '11 at 23:09
    
Ah, yes. The trick there is to do a class StringVector extends Vector<String> and do Vector<String>[] = new StringVector[2] iirc. –  aioobe Feb 22 '11 at 12:08
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You could use the supresswarning annotation

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")

edit: why doesn't the vector < T > work for you? It should? :)

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4  
that's what I would prefer to avoid. –  ddyer Feb 21 '11 at 22:35
    
The <?> attempt results in a The method setElementAt(capture#3-of ?, int) in the type Vector<capture#3-of ?> is not applicable for the arguments (capture#4-of ?, int) –  aioobe Feb 21 '11 at 22:38
    
yeah, forgot that you can't pass anything into a ? generic type, just get. –  KTrum Feb 21 '11 at 22:43
1  
That's not really avoiding the warning, it's just ignoring it! –  berry120 Feb 22 '11 at 1:57
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