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int *intialize(void) 
{
    int value[64];

    for ( int i = 0; i < 64 ; i++)
    {
        value[i] = i;

       return value;   
    }

}  

int main( )
{
    int * p;

    p = intialize();
    p[32] = 100;
    printf("%d", p[32]);

    return 0;
}

Above is the sample code that was asked to me in an interview. Though I failed to find error and obviously rejected, I am curious to know what is exactly wrong with this code.

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2  
Before we go any further, what did you think was wrong with it? –  Jeff Mercado Feb 21 '11 at 23:00
    
I guess , is there is anything wrong with memory ? may be malloc? –  samprat Feb 21 '11 at 23:02
    
Hint: stack.... –  Jim Buck Feb 21 '11 at 23:03
3  
@samprat - No, you are returning the reference of a local variable. –  Mahesh Feb 21 '11 at 23:03
1  
Maybe malloc? I can't see malloc in there. Can you? –  David Heffernan Feb 21 '11 at 23:06
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2 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted
int value[64];  

for ( int i = 0; i < 64 ; i++)  
{
    value[i] = i;  
}
return value;

value is defined in the local scope of initialize() and also, if you could assume that was valid, you return the memory location on the first iteration, hence making the contents of value[] garbage after value[0].

When you define a variable in the local scope, the variable ceases to exist when the function reaches termination. Returning a pointer to a local variable invokes Undefined Behaviour cause you access (and use) memory you should not.

Undefined Behaviour mate ;)


If you want to make it correct you should do something like :

int  * result = malloc(sizeof(int)* 64);  
if(!result)
    return 0;

for ( int i = 0; i < 64 ; i++)  
{
    result[i] = i;  
}
return result;

And also check in your main() if initialize() returns 0 or not (AKA if malloc() succeeded or Failed) and if the return value was not 0 make sure you free() the memory.

int main( )
{
    int * p;

    p = intialize();
    if(p)
    {
         p[32] = 100;
         printf("%d", p[32]);
         free(p);
    }
    return 0;
}

You could also have the free() outside the if clause, cause doing a free(0) is safe.

share|improve this answer
    
I think thats the solution of the problem. Let me check it . I will keep u guys informed.Thanks again to all the folks for such a quick response –  samprat Feb 21 '11 at 23:19
    
On a sidenote : In C you should not cast the result of malloc(). More : c-faq.com/malloc/mallocnocast.html –  Muggen Feb 21 '11 at 23:26
    
Thanks a lot , The program works fine. I have concept about malloc but i just scummed to apply it. –  samprat Feb 21 '11 at 23:27
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'intialize' is a typo (though it is a consistent typo, so will compile).

Did I get it right?

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1  
Also, the code is self-modifying. Everytime I refresh, it's changed :-( –  Snips Feb 21 '11 at 23:12
    
I read this and almost +1ed it for imploring the OP to write "initialise". Then I saw the typo you were actually correcting and felt disappointed. –  James Greenhalgh Feb 22 '11 at 0:08
    
hehe, the OP may be American, so I had to let that pass ;-) –  Snips Feb 22 '11 at 15:39
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