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I dont really understand what the last while loop is doing, can someone explain it?

void reverse(char *str) { 
    char * end = str; 
    char tmp; 

    if (str) {
        while (*end) { 
            ++end;
        }
        --end; 
        while (str < end) {
            tmp = *str; 
            *str++ = *end;
            *end-- = tmp;
        }
    }
}

Can someone walk me through the example "hello"?

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2  
Have you tried drawing this out on paper? Try writing out h e l l o \0 on a piece of paper and walk through where str and end point and what tmp contains at each step through the code. Is there a specific piece of the code that you find confusing? –  James McNellis Feb 22 '11 at 0:29
1  
its swapping characters from each end, moving towards the middle... –  Mitch Wheat Feb 22 '11 at 0:30
    
Nice to see a solution that doesn't invoke strlen() –  marshall.ward Feb 22 '11 at 0:40
    
How about stepping through the code in a debugger. –  Commodore63 Feb 22 '11 at 3:50
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What's basically happening in that innermost while loop is that in each iteration, the characters pointed to by str and end get swapped, str gets incremented to point to the next character, and end is decremented to point to the previous one.

Using "hello" as an example:

v   v
hello
 v v 
oellh
  v
olleh

And then the loop ends, as str = end.

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The basic idea behind this code is to work in two passes:

  1. In the first pass, we end up with a pointer to the last character to the string.
  2. In the second pass, we turn the string around, assisted by the knowledge of where the string ends.

This first pass is given by the following logic:

char *end = str;
while (*end) { 
    ++end;
}
--end; 

This while loop begins with the end pointer pointing at the start of the string. It then continuously advances the end pointer forward one step until the loop condition *end no longer evaluates to true. Because C strings are null-terminated, the loop condition will evaluate to true as long as the end pointer points somewhere in the middle of the string rather than at the null terminator at the end of the string. Thus, when this loop ends, the end pointer will have walked all the way to the end of the string and stopped at the null terminator. We then execute --end to back up the pointer one step. At this point, the end pointer points to the very last character in the string. Here's an example with "Hello:"

 H e l l o
 ^       ^
 |       |
str     end

Now that we have this end pointer, we actually run the logic to reverse the string. This is given by this code:

while (str < end) {
    tmp = *str; 
    *str++ = *end;
    *end-- = tmp;
}

The idea behind this code is that until the start and end pointers of the string have crossed over one another, we swap the values they point at, then march the two pointers inward toward one another. If we rewrite this to the equivalent by slightly more verbose

while (str < end) {
    tmp = *str; 
    *str = *end;
    *end = tmp;

    ++str;
    --end;
}

Then it may be a bit easier to see how this works. The first three lines of this modified loop exchange the values pointed at by the start and end pointers, and the next two lines move the pointers inward. Here's an example:

 H e l l o
 ^       ^
 |       |
str     end

 o e l l H
   ^   ^
   |   |
  str end

 o l l e H
     ^
     |
  str end

At this point, the two pointers meet, and we have correctly reversed the string.

Note that there's an unusual edge case we have to take into account here, and that's what happens when the string is the empty string. If this happens, then the first loop will behave a bit weirdly. In particular, this code:

char *end = str;
while (*end) { 
    ++end;
}
--end; 

Will never execute the body of the loop, because the end pointer will start off pointing to the null terminator. The loop therefore does nothing, and we end up backing up end one step before the string starts! This is an invalid pointer, and dereferencing it will have undefined results. But fortunately, in this case, nothing happens, because the loop to reverse the string has this condition:

while (str < end)

This is immediately false if end is one step before the string starts, so nothing happens.

Hope this helps!

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+1 for the most detailed explanation. –  Stephen Canon Feb 22 '11 at 0:38
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The first while finds the last character; so, after it, end will point to it.

The second while swaps the character pointed by str with the one pointed by end, and moves str onward of 1 character and end backward of 1 character. This way, the characters are swapped going from the extern of the string to the inside.

The look ends when end starts to point to a character before str, which means that we reached the center of the string and all the characters have been already swapped.

"Hello" example:

S   E            S   E
V   V            V   V
Hello  >>swap>>  oellH

>>pointer increment/decrement>>

 S E              S E
 V V              V V
oellH  >>swap>>  olleH

>>pointer increment/decrement>>
it would result in

  E                
  S                
  V                
olleH

but now str is no longer before end, so the loop terminates
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Ok, what it does is this.

void reverse(char *str) { 
    char * end = str;  // copy the pointer 
    char tmp; 

    if (str) {
        // Now step through the string until you get to the last character.
        // which will be the null terminator \0
        while (*end) { 
            ++end;
        }
        // One step back, and we're pointing at the last actual character.
        --end; 
        // Now.  Move the start at either end and work your way inwards until
        // they meet in the middle.
        while (str < end) {
            // take copy of left character into tmp
            tmp = *str; 
            // copy right character into left position and move left pointer right
            *str++ = *end;
            // copy tmp character into right position and move right pointer left
            *end-- = tmp;
        }
    }
}
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#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
main()
{
  int i=0,lenght,j;
  char str[100],st[100];
  printf("\nEnter a string");
  scanf("%s",str);
  lenght=strlen(str);
  for(i=0,j=(lenght-1);str[i]!='\0',j>=0;i++,j--)
   {
      st[j]=str[i];
   }
  st[i]='\0';
  printf("\nThe reversed string is %s\n",st);
 }
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