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As a fun side-project for myself to help in learning yet another PHP MVC framework, I've been writing Reversi / Othello as a PHP & Ajax application, mostly straightforward stuff. I decided against using a multidimensional array for a number of reasons and instead have a linear array ( in this case 64 elements long ) and a couple methods to convert from the coordinates to integers.

So I was curious, is there any other, possibly faster algorithms for converting an integer to a coordinate point?

function int2coord($i){
    $x = (int)($i/8);
    $y = $i - ($x*8);      
    return array($x, $y);
}

//Not a surprise but this is .003 MS slower on average
function int2coord_2($i){
    $b = base_convert($i, 10, 8);
    $x =  (int) ($b != 0 ? $b/8 : 0); // could also be $b < 8 for condition
    $y = $b % 10;
    return array($x, $y);
}

And for posterity sake, the method I wrote for coord2int

function coord2int($x, $y){
   return ($x*8)+$y;
}

Update:
So in the land of the weird, the results were not what I was expecting but using a pre-computed lookup table has predominantly shown to be the fastest, guess trading memory for speed is always a winner?

  • There was a table with times here but I cut it due to styling issues with SO.
share|improve this question
    
Can you use the bit-shift operators to divide and multiply by 8? (<< 3 and >> 3) – Andrew Rollings Feb 3 '09 at 14:38
    
I haven't done much bit manipulation in PHP, but it does have all of the standard bit operators (AND,XOR,OR + shifting ) so its worth a try. – David Feb 3 '09 at 14:43
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I don't have the time to measure this myself right now, but I would suspect that a pre-computed lookup table would beat your solution in speed. The code would look something like this:

class Converter  {
    private $_table;

    function __construct() 
    {
        $this->_table = array();
        for ($i=0; $i<64; $i++) {
            $this->_table[$i] = array( (int)($i/8), (int)($i%8) ); 
        }
    }

    function int2coord( $i )
    {
        return $this->_table[$i];
    }
}

$conv = new Converter(); 
$coord = $conv->int2coord( 42 );

Of course, this does add a lot of over-head so in practice you would only bother to pre-compute all coordinates if you conversion code was called very often.

share|improve this answer
    
The pre-computed lookup table is so far the fastest in half the time of the other two. – David Feb 3 '09 at 15:28
    
I would have thought so, but nice to know! Thanks for measuring. – cg. Feb 3 '09 at 15:51
    
I was wondering whether the table would be faster than bitshifting or not. In pure assembly code the table should be faster, but there's always interesting overhead in compilers that you don't see until you do testing. Glad to see this is faster, though. – Adam Davis Feb 3 '09 at 16:39

Oh yes! This is a perfect example of binary:

function int2coord($i){
    $x = $i >> 3;
    $y = $i & 0x07;      
    return array($x, $y);
}

The reality is that a good compiler will find this optimization and use it, so it's not necessarily faster. Test and see if your compiler/interpreter does this.

It works because any binary division by 8 is the same as a right shift by 3 bits. Modern processors have barrel shifters that can do up to a 32 bit shift in one instruction.

The reverse is as easy:

function coord2int($x, $y){
   return ($x << 3)+$y;
}
share|improve this answer
    
It looks like any possible performance gains to be had with bit-shifting gets eaten by how high up in abstraction land PHP is. – David Feb 3 '09 at 16:47
    
Very interesting. Chances are good the array operations have been very highly optimized, but little attention has been paid to binary operators - they likely aren't used often in PHP applications. Wonder if this changes under a Zend optimizer... – Adam Davis Feb 3 '09 at 16:56
    
Does ZO actually...optimize? I swore it was mostly an extension for running obfuscated/encrypted php opcode. – David Feb 4 '09 at 15:12
    
Hm. Well, according to their latest marketing literature ZO no longer optimizes. They used to have only one product, and it did have performance enhancements, but it sounds like they've segmented it into several products, and only Zend Platform actually has performance improvements. – Adam Davis Feb 4 '09 at 15:24

I'm not in a position to measure right now, but you should be able to eke out some additional speed with this:

function int2coord($i){
  $y = $i%8;
  $x = (int)($i/8);
  return array($x, $y);
}

edit: ignore me -- Adam's bitshifting answer should be superior.

share|improve this answer
function int2coord_3($i){
    return array((int) ($i / 8), ($i % 8));
}

this is a little faster because there is no var declaration and affectation.

share|improve this answer
    
In the land of the weird, removing the extra var puts your code in the top three. – David Feb 3 '09 at 16:43

I think most of your performance is lost by returning array(...) at the end. Instead, I propose:
* define two functions, one for x and one for y
    or
* inline the bit arithmetic in code needing the calculation

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