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I have a set of three numbers and I want to store multiple copies of this set in an array. for example, If I was doing it in C it would be something like:

struct tParams
{
    int    v;
    double A;
    double n;
};

static struct tParams Params[] = 
{
    { 4230, 1.477404177730177e-04, 1.9565},
    { 3680, 1.920339268755614e-04, 1.925 },
    { 3450, 2.894751026819746e-04, 1.875 },
    { 3295, 4.349905111115636e-04, 1.825 },
    //...
};

How would I go about this in Java?

Thanks

EDIT To clarify, these values will be hard coded and only referenced. If I use a ListArray of classes, it looks like I need to add each object from within a method.

I'm building a class with methods that preform mathematical operations. Some of these methods use the data I am hard coding to get coefficients. In C, the structs are defined within the main mathOperations class, but not in a method.

share|improve this question
    
Any time you would have used a struct in C, use a class in Java. You are more than welcome to have data-only classes with no methods. It's common practice to make them immutable or private though. So instead of tParams.v, it's much more common to do tParams.getV(). –  corsiKa Feb 22 '11 at 2:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think this is the most literal translation of your C code:

  class tParam {
    int    v;
    double A;
    double n;

    private tParam(int v, double A, double n) {
        this.v = v;
        this.A = A;
        this.n = n;
    }
}

tParam[] params = {
    new tParam(4230, 1.477404177730177e-04, 1.9565),
    new tParam(3680, 1.920339268755614e-04, 1.925),
    new tParam(3450, 2.894751026819746e-04, 1.875),
    new tParam(3295, 4.349905111115636e-04, 1.825)
};

It has the advantage of not using all those setters which are redundant for your case since they're 'set once' as you say. Also, given that the data is a static list, there's no point using a List class - the array is fine.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that looks like exactly what I needed! I had a feeling I just wasn't explaining it well enough. I'll try it out tomorrow. –  Matt Feb 22 '11 at 5:48

Depends on just what you're trying to do.

In general, you probably want to use a class in Java where you would have used a struct in c. Something like this would be the most standard way to do it:

public class Params {

    private Integer v;
    private Double a;
    private Double n;

    public Params(int V, double A, double N){
        this.v=V;
        this.a=A;
        this.n=N;
    }
    public Integer getV() {
        return v;
    }
    public void setV(Integer v) {
        this.v = v;
    }
    public Double getA() {
        return a;
    }
    public void setA(Double a) {
        this.a = a;
    }
    public Double getN() {
        return n;
    }
    public void setN(Double n) {
        this.n = n;
    }

}

The short variable names are generally considered poor practice in Javaland for variables with class scope. While it would be possible to do this without the getters and setters by just making the class variables public, that's generally (though by no means universally), considered poor practice as well. For a simple class like this with no behavior, I'd probably just make everything public.

share|improve this answer

One option is using a class. I don't think having getters and setters is necessary if you are using it for something simple.

public class TParams {
    public int v;
    public double A;
    public double n;
}

If performance is important, I would consider using parallel arrays of primitives. This will be faster because you will avoid the overhead associated with object creation. This is especially true if you are swapping values in and out of the arrays frequently. Google recommends considering this technique if you are doing Android programming. You could wrap the whole thing into a class, looking something like this depending on your needs:

public class TParamsList {
    double[] a
    double[] n;
    int[] v;

    public TParamsList(int size) {
        a = new double[size];
        n = new double[size];
        v = new int[size];
    }

    public void setValue(int slot, int v, double a, double n) {
        a[slot] = a;
        n[slot] = n;
        v[slot] = a;
    }

    public int getV(int slot) {
        return v[slot];
    }

    public int getA(int slot) {
        return a[slot];
    }

    public int getN(int slot) {
        return n[slot];
    }

}
share|improve this answer

Instead of your struct, you could have a class:

public class TParams
{

   private int v;
   private double A;
   private double n;

   public TParams(int v, double A, double n)
   {
      this.v = v;
      this.A = A;
      this.n = n;
   }

   // Getters + Setters
}

Then you can have a list of instances of your class, like this:

ArrayList<TParams> tParamsList = new ArrayList<TParams>();
tParamsList.add(new TParams(4230, 1.477404177730177e-04, 1.9565));
etc.

EDIT

You should be able to do it this way:

TParams tParamsArray[] = { tParams_1, tParams_2, tParams_3 }; //Where tParams_xx are all instances of your TParams class
tParamsList.addAll(Arrays.asList(tParamsArray));
share|improve this answer
    
I was thinking about using a class, but I didn't know the best way to initialize the each item. Is there any way add multiple entries at a time? Like .add({v,a,n}, {v,a,n]...etc)? –  Matt Feb 22 '11 at 2:43
    
@Matt: See my edit! It should work! –  Amokrane Chentir Feb 22 '11 at 2:48
    
Thanks, but after trying it, I'm not sure if this is what I'm looking for. The data I have I need to enter into my code and it will never be changed, just referenced. I'm not sure if I'm explaining this right... Basically the my app will find the "TParams" with the closest v and use the A and N values associated with it. each array of "TParams" will be hard coded by me. –  Matt Feb 22 '11 at 2:58
    
@Matt: What if you just use an external file (CSV format) to store your hard-coded data and write a method that loads your data from this file? I think it is better, because you won't have to modify your code if "someday" one of your values changes! –  Amokrane Chentir Feb 22 '11 at 3:05

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