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This might sound naive, but...

class Widget
{
    public int Foo { get; set; }
}

That's cool, and saves some boilerplate against using a backing field, but at that point, isn't it equivalent to simply:

class Widget
{
    public int Foo;
}

Seems like it's little more than a public field, though I suppose it looks different under the hood. From a design point, though, what's the advantage of using a property if it doesn't aid encapsulation?

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1  
This is also a question Jon Skeet answered in Why Properties Matter. The entire thing is quite good, but the part that stuck with me was A property communicates the idea of "I will make a value available to you, or accept a value from you." It's not an implementation concept, it's an interface concept. A field, on the other hand, communicates the implementation - it says "this type represents a value in this very specific way". –  R0MANARMY Feb 27 '11 at 2:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Because it gives you the potential to add encapsulated logic later without changing the metadata of the class.

Using properties is considered a best practice - automatically implemented properties were designed to take away the tediousness of writing properties to encourage developers to adhere to this best practice

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I guess that's reason enough. Is changing metadata a Big Deal in .NET? –  Cheezmeister Feb 22 '11 at 4:02
    
It is if you are using reflection and other things that are dependent of the metadata. –  Andrew Hare Feb 22 '11 at 4:04
9  
It's a Big Deal on any platform where someone else might be using your code. Having a property vs. a public field makes a difference in how other code accesses the value. At a minimum, it requires recompilation (as opposed to simply dropping in a new binary). It can require rebuilding of proxy classes and so on. If you're certain that nobody else will use your class (including on another team within your company), then it's probably not an issue. But otherwise, you should stick with the best practice. –  ThatBlairGuy Feb 22 '11 at 4:06
    
Ah, got it. I guess I am rather spoiled by all this hobbyist coding that no one else needs to cringe at :) –  Cheezmeister Feb 22 '11 at 4:29

In addition to the other good answers posted so far:

  • it is easy to quickly create a private-setter-public-getter property, which is an arguably better practice than a public readonly field for making an immutable data type.
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Probably the most clear reason to choose an autoproperty over a variable. –  BinaryTox1n Feb 22 '11 at 4:01
  1. properties allow you to add encapsulation to your class
  2. properties allow your access to be polymorphic (inheritors can modify access if the property is virtual) if you so choose.
  3. auto-properties are nice when you're dealing with simple get/set operations. if you do more complicated operations inside your get / set, then you can't use the auto-property.

also, reflection doesn't work differently on properties than it does on variables though, you're working with a MemberInfo (FieldInfo, PropertyInfo, or MethodInfo whichever way you choose).

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1  
+1 I didn't know properties could be virtual! –  Cheezmeister Feb 22 '11 at 5:24
  1. Some sort of standards any programmer may be required to follow for whatever reason
  2. Reflection works differently on properties than on variables
  3. You can't databind against a variable
  4. You have to rebuild all code that used the variable if you ever decide to change it to a property
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From msdn:

Properties combine aspects of both fields and methods. To the user of an object, a property appears to be a field, accessing the property requires the same syntax.

You can do something like this:

public class Date
{
private int month = 7;  // Backing store

public int Month
{
    get
    {
        return month;
    }
    set
    {
        if ((value > 0) && (value < 13))
        {
            month = value;
        }
    }
}
}

Simply put properties are a lot more versatile.

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The question was about auto properties. –  notfed Aug 15 '14 at 20:42

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