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I'm looking for a good approach for efficiently dividing an image into small regions, processing each region separately, and then re-assembling the results from each process into a single processed image. Matlab had a tool for this called blkproc (replaced by blockproc in newer versions of Matlab).

In an ideal world, the function or class would support overlap between the divisions in the input matrix too. In the Matlab help, blkproc is defined as:

B = blkproc(A,[m n],[mborder nborder],fun,...)

  • A is your input matrix,
  • [m n] is the block size
  • [mborder, nborder] is the size of your border region (optional)
  • fun is a function to apply to each block

I have kluged together an approach, but it strikes me as clumsy and I bet there's a much better way. At the risk of my own embarrassment, here's my code:


import numpy as np

def segmented_process(M, blk_size=(16,16), overlap=(0,0), fun=None):
    rows = []
    for i in range(0, M.shape[0], blk_size[0]):
        cols = []
        for j in range(0, M.shape[1], blk_size[1]):
            cols.append(fun(M[i:i+blk_size[0], j:j+blk_size[1]]))
        rows.append(np.concatenate(cols, axis=1))
    return np.concatenate(rows, axis=0)

R = np.random.rand(128,128)
passthrough = lambda(x):x
Rprime = segmented_process(R, blk_size=(16,16), 
                           overlap=(0,0), 
                           fun=passthrough)

np.all(R==Rprime)
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5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Here are some examples of a different (loop free) way to work with blocks:

import numpy as np
from numpy.lib.stride_tricks import as_strided as ast

A= np.arange(36).reshape(6, 6)
print A
#[[ 0  1  2  3  4  5]
# [ 6  7  8  9 10 11]
# ...
# [30 31 32 33 34 35]]

# 2x2 block view
B= ast(A, shape= (3, 3, 2, 2), strides= (48, 8, 24, 4))
print B[1, 1]
#[[14 15]
# [20 21]]

# for preserving original shape
B[:, :]= np.dot(B[:, :], np.array([[0, 1], [1, 0]]))
print A
#[[ 1  0  3  2  5  4]
# [ 7  6  9  8 11 10]
# ...
# [31 30 33 32 35 34]]
print B[1, 1]
#[[15 14]
# [21 20]]

# for reducing shape, processing in 3D is enough
C= B.reshape(3, 3, -1)
print C.sum(-1)
#[[ 14  22  30]
# [ 62  70  78]
# [110 118 126]]

So just trying to simply copy the matlab functionality to numpy is not all ways the best way to proceed. Sometimes a 'off the hat' thinking is needed.

Caveat:
In general, implementations based on stride tricks may (but does not necessary need to) suffer some performance penalties. So be prepared to all ways measure your performance. In any case it's wise to first check if the needed functionality (or similar enough, in order to easily adapt for) has all ready been implemented in numpy or scipy.

Update:
Please note that there is no real magic involved here with the strides, so I'll provide a simple function to get a block_view of any suitable 2D numpy-array. So here we go:

from numpy.lib.stride_tricks import as_strided as ast

def block_view(A, block= (3, 3)):
    """Provide a 2D block view to 2D array. No error checking made.
    Therefore meaningful (as implemented) only for blocks strictly
    compatible with the shape of A."""
    # simple shape and strides computations may seem at first strange
    # unless one is able to recognize the 'tuple additions' involved ;-)
    shape= (A.shape[0]/ block[0], A.shape[1]/ block[1])+ block
    strides= (block[0]* A.strides[0], block[1]* A.strides[1])+ A.strides
    return ast(A, shape= shape, strides= strides)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    from numpy import arange
    A= arange(144).reshape(12, 12)
    print block_view(A)[0, 0]
    #[[ 0  1  2]
    # [12 13 14]
    # [24 25 26]]
    print block_view(A, (2, 6))[0, 0]
    #[[ 0  1  2  3  4  5]
    # [12 13 14 15 16 17]]
    print block_view(A, (3, 12))[0, 0]
    #[[ 0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11]
    # [12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23]
    # [24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35]]
share|improve this answer
    
This is a neat trick and I learned something about the numpy internal structure but it looks extremely difficult to generalize to arbitrary sized matrices. –  Carl F. Feb 23 '11 at 1:24
    
@Carl F.: What you mean by arbitrary sized matrices? If you are working with 2D arrays, and need to divide them to any compatible blocks, the strides and shapes calculations are trivial. You may ask more related to this aspect. Anyway I'll suggest you to give stride tricks a chance, it may pay back in the long run. Thanks –  eat Feb 23 '11 at 9:15
    
I'd like a function that can take any block size as input and I don't see how to compute the values for the strides. Can you provide an algorithm for computing them based on block size? compute_strides(16,16) versus compute_strides(2,2)? I read through the docs but found them a tough to follow. To be honest, I'm closer to the physics than the computer science these days. –  Carl F. Feb 24 '11 at 14:51
    
@Carl F: I have updated my answer. Do you find it more useful, for your purposes, now? Thanks –  eat Feb 26 '11 at 18:40
    
I'm planning to compare the two answers at some point and vote for the fastest. I just got distracted by other work. –  Carl F. Mar 2 '11 at 2:14

Process by slices/views. Concatenation is very expensive.

for x in xrange(0, 160, 16):
    for y in xrange(0, 160, 16):
        view = A[x:x+16, y:y+16]
        view[:,:] = fun(view)
share|improve this answer
    
This definately helps with my performance issues. I'll have to adapt it slightly for general sized matrices. Also, I suspect I could use some itertools to make it a single for loop. Then maybe it would support parallelization. –  Carl F. Feb 23 '11 at 1:25
    
This approach is definitely the easiest to understand and provides substantial improvements (2-4x), but it got smoked by the shape and stride method. The other approach demonstrated an order of magnitude improvement for small image regions! –  Carl F. Mar 2 '11 at 3:09

I took both inputs, as well as my original approach and compared the results. As @eat correctly points out, the results depend on the nature of your input data. Surprisingly, concatenate beats view processing in a few instances. Each method has a sweet-spot. Here is my benchmark code:

import numpy as np
from itertools import product

def segment_and_concatenate(M, fun=None, blk_size=(16,16), overlap=(0,0)):
    # truncate M to a multiple of blk_size
    M = M[:M.shape[0]-M.shape[0]%blk_size[0], 
          :M.shape[1]-M.shape[1]%blk_size[1]]
    rows = []
    for i in range(0, M.shape[0], blk_size[0]):
        cols = []
        for j in range(0, M.shape[1], blk_size[1]):
            max_ndx = (min(i+blk_size[0], M.shape[0]),
                       min(j+blk_size[1], M.shape[1]))
            cols.append(fun(M[i:max_ndx[0], j:max_ndx[1]]))
        rows.append(np.concatenate(cols, axis=1))
    return np.concatenate(rows, axis=0)


from numpy.lib.stride_tricks import as_strided
def block_view(A, block= (3, 3)):
    """Provide a 2D block view to 2D array. No error checking made.
    Therefore meaningful (as implemented) only for blocks strictly
    compatible with the shape of A."""
    # simple shape and strides computations may seem at first strange
    # unless one is able to recognize the 'tuple additions' involved ;-)
    shape= (A.shape[0]/ block[0], A.shape[1]/ block[1])+ block
    strides= (block[0]* A.strides[0], block[1]* A.strides[1])+ A.strides
    return as_strided(A, shape= shape, strides= strides)

def segmented_stride(M, fun, blk_size=(3,3), overlap=(0,0)):
    # This is some complex function of blk_size and M.shape
    stride = blk_size
    output = np.zeros(M.shape)

    B = block_view(M, block=blk_size)
    O = block_view(output, block=blk_size)

    for b,o in zip(B, O):
        o[:,:] = fun(b);

    return output

def view_process(M, fun=None, blk_size=(16,16), overlap=None):
    # truncate M to a multiple of blk_size
    from itertools import product
    output = np.zeros(M.shape)

    dz = np.asarray(blk_size)
    shape = M.shape - (np.mod(np.asarray(M.shape), 
                          blk_size))
    for indices in product(*[range(0, stop, step) 
                        for stop,step in zip(shape, blk_size)]):
        # Don't overrun the end of the array.
        #max_ndx = np.min((np.asarray(indices) + dz, M.shape), axis=0)
        #slices = [slice(s, s + f, None) for s,f in zip(indices, dz)]
        output[indices[0]:indices[0]+dz[0], 
               indices[1]:indices[1]+dz[1]][:,:] = fun(M[indices[0]:indices[0]+dz[0], 
               indices[1]:indices[1]+dz[1]])

    return output

if __name__ == "__main__":
    R = np.random.rand(128,128)
    squareit = lambda(x):x*2

    from timeit import timeit
    t ={}
    kn = np.array(list(product((8,16,64,128), 
                               (128, 512, 2048, 4096))  ) )

    methods = ("segment_and_concatenate", 
               "view_process", 
               "segmented_stride")    
    t = np.zeros((kn.shape[0], len(methods)))

    for i, (k, N) in enumerate(kn):
        for j, method in enumerate(methods):
            t[i,j] = timeit("""Rprime = %s(R, blk_size=(%d,%d), 
                          overlap = (0,0), 
                          fun = squareit)""" % (method, k, k),
                   setup="""
from segmented_processing import %s
import numpy as np
R = np.random.rand(%d,%d)
squareit = lambda(x):x**2""" % (method, N, N),
number=5
)
        print "k =", k, "N =", N #, "time:", t[i]
        print ("    Speed up (view vs. concat, stride vs. concat): %0.4f, %0.4f" % (
                       t[i][0]/t[i][1], 
                       t[i][0]/t[i][2]))

And here are the results:

A comparison of three methods for processing large matrices in a block-wise fashion in numpy Note that the segmented stride method wins by 3-4x for small block sizes. Only at large block sizes (128 x 128) and very large matrices (2048 x 2048 and larger) does the view processing approach win, and then only by a small percentage. Based on the bake-off, it looks like @eat gets the check-mark! Thanks to both of you for good examples!

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Nice benchmark! I think it demonstrates very well some of the difficulties one will face when trying to make general purpose code. Actually it's highly nontrivial problem to produce code which always performs optimal way. Thanks –  eat Mar 2 '11 at 8:21

Bit late to the game, but this would do overlapping blocks. I haven't done it here, but you could easily adapt for step sizes for shifting the window, I think:

from numpy.lib.stride_tricks import as_strided
def rolling_block(A, block=(3, 3)):
    shape = (A.shape[0] - block[0] + 1, A.shape[1] - block[1] + 1) + block
    strides = (A.strides[0], A.strides[1]) + A.strides
    return as_strided(A, shape=shape, strides=strides)
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Even later in the game. There is a Swiss Image processing package called Bob available at: https://www.idiap.ch/software/bob/docs/releases/last/sphinx/html/index.html It has a python command bob.ip.block described at: https://www.idiap.ch/software/bob/docs/releases/last/sphinx/html/ip/generated/bob.ip.block.html#bob.ip.block which appears to do everything the Matlab command 'blockproc' does. I have not tested it.

There's also an interesting command bob.ip.DCTFeatures which incorporates the 'block' capabilities to extract or modify DCT coefficients of an image.

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