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I can color keywords in emacs using the following lisp code in .emacs:

(add-hook 'c-mode-common-hook
          (lambda () (font-lock-add-keywords nil
           '(("\\<\\(bla[a-zA-Z1-9_]*\\)" 1 font-lock-warning-face t)))))

This code color all keywords that start with "bla". Example: blaTest123_test

However when I try to add @ (the 'at' symbol) instead of "bla", it doesn't seem to work. I don't think @ is a special character for regular expressions.

Do you know how I can get emacs to highlight keywords starting with the @ symbol?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your problem is the \< in your regexp, which

matches the empty string, but only at the beginning of a word. `\<' matches at the beginning of the buffer (or string) only if a word-constituent character follows.

and @ is not a word-constituent character.

See: M-: (info "(elisp) Regexp Backslash") RET

This unrestricted pattern will colour any @:

(font-lock-add-keywords nil
  '(("@" 0 font-lock-warning-face t)))

And this will do something like what you want, by requiring either BOL or some white space immediately beforehand.

(font-lock-add-keywords nil
  '(("\\(?:^\\|\\s-\\)\\(@[a-zA-Z1-9_]*\\)" 1 font-lock-warning-face t)))
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect, thank you, worked like a charm! –  Lex Feb 22 '11 at 7:59
    
btw, I just noticed that you specified [1-9] rather than [0-9]. I imagine you want to allow zeros as well? –  phils Feb 22 '11 at 12:58
    
Another great catch, thanks –  Lex Feb 22 '11 at 14:10
    
Also, a better approach for this particular case would be to add a syntax-table entry for that particular symbol. Make it "punctuation" and font-lock will automatically set the punctuation font-face on the symbol. –  Cheeso Feb 27 '11 at 19:44

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