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Im trying to to create a simple 4 function calculator using a jump table without switch case or if/else statements. I understand I can create the jump table via function pointers but I am kindda blanking out. I've started with the addition and subtraction part of the program but am trying to grasp the design/strategy to use. I am also getting an error when putting the method in the array, so far this is what i have:

public class Calculator {

          public abstract class Functor{

            abstract double Compute(double op1, double op2);
            }

     class Addition extends Functor
    {

        public double Compute(double op1, double op2){ return op1 + op2;}
    }

    class Subtraction extends Functor
    {

        public double Compute(double op1, double op2){ return op1 - op2;}
    }



    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Functor add = new Addition();     // Problem here
        Functor sub = new Subtraction();  // and here



    }
}

any help or ideas for the step in the right direction is greatly appreciated! thanks in advance!

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every time this comes around, I really want to return to Scala! –  nanda Feb 22 '11 at 9:56
    
possible duplicate of What's the nearest substitute for a function pointer in Java? –  Raedwald Feb 25 '13 at 13:39
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

While that's decent (aside from not having constructors that work right) I'd do it different, using anonymous classes.

abstract class Functor {


    public abstract double compute(double a, double b);

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Functor add = new Functor() {
            // defining it here is essentially how you do a function pointer
            public double compute(double a, double b) { return a + b; }
        };

        Functor subtract = new Functor() {
            public double compute(double a, double b) { return a - b; }
        };

        System.out.println(add.compute(1.0,2.0));
        System.out.println(subtract.compute(1.0,2.0));

    }

}

Result:

C:\Documents and Settings\glowcoder\My Documents>java Functor
3.0
-1.0

C:\Documents and Settings\glowcoder\My Documents>
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Let's try this instead:

public enum Operation {
  PLUS("+") {
    double apply(double x, double y) { return x + y; }
  },
  MINUS("-") {
    double apply(double x, double y) { return x - y; }
  },
  TIMES("*") {
    double apply(double x, double y) { return x * y; }
  },
  DIVIDE("/") {
    double apply(double x, double y) { return x / y; }
  };
  private final String symbol;

  Operation(String symbol) {
    this.symbol = symbol; 
  }

  @Override public String toString() {
    return symbol; 
  }
  abstract double apply(double x, double y);
}

This will only work if you're using Java 5 or later, which has generics and enums. What this does is it gives you a static set of operations. You access them by typing Operation.PLUS or Operation.MINUS, etc.

To test it try this:

public static void main(String[] args) {
  double x = Double.parseDouble(args[0]);
  double y = Double.parseDouble(args[1]);

  for (Operation op : Operation.values())
    System.out.printf("%f %s %f = %f%n", x, op, y, op.apply(x, y));
}

For more information consult Effective Java, Second Edition by Joshua Bloch.

It's worth pointing out that Java has no notion of "function pointers". Rather you simple write an interface and write a class that implements that interface. The correct class to use is selected at runtime; hence, that is a "jump table" but it's hidden behind the semantics of object-oriented programming. This is known as polymorphism.

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While reading about java design patterns there should also be a way to do this using an abstract class with 4 interfaces (one for each operation). I believe this is called the strategy pattern....Am I understanding correctly? –  Java Beans Feb 22 '11 at 21:30
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You don't have any constructors to pass in any arguments to your sub-classes, I don't understand how you think opt1 and opt2 are going to be set without any constructors with those as parameters. This is not correct Java code right now.

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It is Java code. It appears all his classes do start with Capitals, and while he may have a bug (he never gets to his variables) it is most certainly Java code. –  corsiKa Feb 22 '11 at 4:58
    
what seems to be wrong with the constructors? –  Java Beans Feb 23 '11 at 0:31
    
they don't take any arguments –  Jarrod Roberson Feb 23 '11 at 0:58
    
oops, silly me...edit has been made, now going to go figure out the problem with initializing the concrete classes. –  Java Beans Feb 23 '11 at 1:23
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