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How can i give composite primary key in Rails without any gem?

My first table in migration file:

class CreateUsers < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    create_table :users do |t|
      t.string :userid
      t.string :name
      t.string :address
      t.timestamps
    end
  end

  def self.down
    drop_table :users
  end
end

My second table in migration file:

class CreateProjects < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    create_table :projects do |t|
      t.string :title
      t.string :description
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
  def self.down
    drop_table :projects
  end
end

In my schema file:

ActiveRecord::Schema.define(:version => 20110222044146) do
  create_table "projects", :force => true do |t|
    t.string   "title"
    t.string   "description"
    t.datetime "created_at"
    t.datetime "updated_at"
  end

  create_table "users", :force => true do |t|
    t.string   "userid"
    t.string   "name"
    t.string   "address"
    t.datetime "created_at"
    t.datetime "updated_at"
  end
end

Now I want to create a table called User_has_project in which I will refer to User and Project that means will have 2 foreign keys. So I tried like this:

class CreateUser_has_projects < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    create_table :user_has_projects do |t|
      t.references :User
      t.references :Project
      t.boolean :status
      t.timestamps
    end
  end

  def self.down
    drop_table :users
  end
end

Now how can I set combination of user_id and project_id as a primary key in user_has_projects?

share|improve this question
    
Also, your last migration file has some nasty errors in it, namely that your down action will drop the users table instead of the one you want to drop. –  Dan Cheail Feb 22 '11 at 5:18
    
@Dan: It was auto generated by scaffold command. I'm new to rails so I don't no whether to keep it or delete it or update it. You can give a suggestion. –  Harry Joy Feb 22 '11 at 5:25
    
I'd delete it, and use what I've suggested below. In Rails, model names can only be CamelCased - they can't have underscores. –  Dan Cheail Feb 22 '11 at 5:36
    
@Dan: okay I'll follow your instructions. –  Harry Joy Feb 22 '11 at 6:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It looks like you're trying to specify a many-many relationship between Users and Projects, with an additional field on the relationship itself.

The way you're currently doing isn't the Rails way of doing things - especially with the concept of a composite primary key.

The Rails/ActiveRecord way of doing this sort of relationship modelling is to have a third model that describes the relationship between User and Project. For the sake of example, I'm going to call it an Assignment. All you need to do is re-name your user_has_projects table to assignments like so:

class CreateAssignments < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    create_table :assignments do |t|
      t.references :user
      t.references :project
      t.boolean :status
      t.timestamps
    end
  end

  def self.down
    drop_table :assignments
  end
end

And then, in your model files:

# app/models/user.rb
class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :assignments
  has_many :projects, :through => :assignments
end

# app/models/assignment.rb
class Assignment < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :project
end

# app/models/project.rb
class Project < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :assignments
  has_many :users, :through => :assignments
end

You can read more about this here: http://guides.rubyonrails.org/association_basics.html#the-has_many-through-association

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