Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What's the simplest way of blocking a thread until a file has been unlocked and is accessible for reading and renaming? For example, is there a WaitOnFile() somewhere in the .NET Framework?

I have a service that uses a FileSystemWatcher to look for files that are to be transmitted to an FTP site, but the file created event fires before the other process has finished writing the file.

The ideal solution would have a timeout period so the thread doesn't hang forever before giving up.

Edit: After trying out some of the solutions below, I ended up changing the system so that all files wrote to Path.GetTempFileName(), then performed a File.Move() to the final location. As soon as the FileSystemWatcher event fired, the file was already complete.

share|improve this question
3  
Since the release of .NET 4.0, is there a better way to solve this problem? –  Jason Nov 22 '10 at 20:48
    

14 Answers 14

up vote 21 down vote accepted

This was the answer I gave on a related question:

    /// <summary>
    /// Blocks until the file is not locked any more.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="fullPath"></param>
    bool WaitForFile(string fullPath)
    {
        int numTries = 0;
        while (true)
        {
            ++numTries;
            try
            {
                // Attempt to open the file exclusively.
                using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(fullPath,
                    FileMode.Open, FileAccess.ReadWrite, 
                    FileShare.None, 100))
                {
                    fs.ReadByte();

                    // If we got this far the file is ready
                    break;
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Log.LogWarning(
                   "WaitForFile {0} failed to get an exclusive lock: {1}", 
                    fullPath, ex.ToString());

                if (numTries > 10)
                {
                    Log.LogWarning(
                        "WaitForFile {0} giving up after 10 tries", 
                        fullPath);
                    return false;
                }

                // Wait for the lock to be released
                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(500);
            }
        }

        Log.LogTrace("WaitForFile {0} returning true after {1} tries",
            fullPath, numTries);
        return true;
    }
share|improve this answer
4  
I find this ugly but the only possible solution –  knoopx Apr 29 '09 at 9:31
3  
Is this really going to work in the general case? if you open the file in a using() clause, the file is closed and unlocked when the using scope ends. If there is a second process using the same strategy as this (retry repeatedly), then after exit of WaitForFile(), there is a race condition regarding whether the file will be openable or not. No? –  Cheeso Jun 13 '09 at 21:11
    
Are you talking about 2 threads in the same app calling WaitForFile on the same file? Hmm, not sure, since I mostly use this to wait for other processes to let go of the file. I've had this code in production for a long time and it has worked well for me. Should be pretty simple to write a an app to test your theory. –  Eric Z Beard Jun 15 '09 at 19:40
39  
Bad idea! While the concept is right, a better solution will be to return the FileStream instead of a bool. If the file is locked again before the user got a chance to get his lock on the file - he will get an exception even if the function returned "false" –  Nissim Feb 23 '10 at 9:26
1  
where is Fero's method ? –  vbp Jul 14 '14 at 20:10

Starting from Eric's answer, I included some improvements to make the code far more compact and reusable. Hope it's useful.

FileStream WaitForFile (string fullPath, FileMode mode, FileAccess access, FileShare share)
{
    for (int numTries = 0; numTries < 10; numTries++) {
        try {
            FileStream fs = new FileStream (fullPath, mode, access, share);

            fs.ReadByte ();
            fs.Seek (0, SeekOrigin.Begin);

            return fs;
        }
        catch (IOException) {
            Thread.Sleep (50);
        }
    }

    return null;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Sorry, what is wrong with this answer? The code worked great for me. Just drop me a message and I'll try and improve it. –  mafu May 24 '11 at 9:02
2  
I've come from the future to say that this code still works like a charm. Thanks. –  OnoSendai Dec 2 '13 at 16:31

I threw together a helper class for these sorts of things. It will work if you have control over everything that would access the file. If you're expecting contention from a bunch of other things, then this is pretty worthless.

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Threading;

/// <summary>
/// This is a wrapper aroung a FileStream.  While it is not a Stream itself, it can be cast to
/// one (keep in mind that this might throw an exception).
/// </summary>
public class SafeFileStream: IDisposable
{
    #region Private Members
    private Mutex m_mutex;
    private Stream m_stream;
    private string m_path;
    private FileMode m_fileMode;
    private FileAccess m_fileAccess;
    private FileShare m_fileShare;
    #endregion//Private Members

    #region Constructors
    public SafeFileStream(string path, FileMode mode, FileAccess access, FileShare share)
    {
    	m_mutex = new Mutex(false, String.Format("Global\\{0}", path.Replace('\\', '/')));
    	m_path = path;
    	m_fileMode = mode;
    	m_fileAccess = access;
    	m_fileShare = share;
    }
    #endregion//Constructors

    #region Properties
    public Stream UnderlyingStream
    {
    	get
    	{
    		if (!IsOpen)
    			throw new InvalidOperationException("The underlying stream does not exist - try opening this stream.");
    		return m_stream;
    	}
    }

    public bool IsOpen
    {
    	get { return m_stream != null; }
    }
    #endregion//Properties

    #region Functions
    /// <summary>
    /// Opens the stream when it is not locked.  If the file is locked, then
    /// </summary>
    public void Open()
    {
    	if (m_stream != null)
    		throw new InvalidOperationException(SafeFileResources.FileOpenExceptionMessage);
    	m_mutex.WaitOne();
    	m_stream = File.Open(m_path, m_fileMode, m_fileAccess, m_fileShare);
    }

    public bool TryOpen(TimeSpan span)
    {
    	if (m_stream != null)
    		throw new InvalidOperationException(SafeFileResources.FileOpenExceptionMessage);
    	if (m_mutex.WaitOne(span))
    	{
    		m_stream = File.Open(m_path, m_fileMode, m_fileAccess, m_fileShare);
    		return true;
    	}
    	else
    		return false;
    }

    public void Close()
    {
    	if (m_stream != null)
    	{
    		m_stream.Close();
    		m_stream = null;
    		m_mutex.ReleaseMutex();
    	}
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
    	Close();
    	GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    public static explicit operator Stream(SafeFileStream sfs)
    {
    	return sfs.UnderlyingStream;
    }
    #endregion//Functions
}

It works using a named mutex. Those wishing to access the file attempt to acquire control of the named mutex, which shares the name of the file (with the '\'s turned into '/'s). You can either use Open(), which will stall until the mutex is accessible or you can use TryOpen(TimeSpan), which tries to acquire the mutex for the given duration and returns false if it cannot acquire within the time span. This should most likely be used inside a using block, to ensure that locks are released properly, and the stream (if open) will be properly disposed when this object is disposed.

I did a quick test with ~20 things to do various reads/writes of the file and saw no corruption. Obviously it's not very advanced, but it should work for the majority of simple cases.

share|improve this answer
    
Great solution... thanks! –  Nissim Feb 23 '10 at 9:40

Here is a generic code to do this, independant from the file operation itself. This is an example on how to use it:

WrapSharingViolations(() => File.Delete(myFile));

or

WrapSharingViolations(() => File.Copy(mySourceFile, myDestFile));

You can also define the retry count, and the wait time between retries.

NOTE: Unfortunately, the underlying Win32 error (ERROR_SHARING_VIOLATION) is not exposed with .NET, so I have added a small hack function (IsSharingViolation) based on reflection mechanisms to check this.

    /// <summary>
    /// Wraps sharing violations that could occur on a file IO operation.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="action">The action to execute. May not be null.</param>
    public static void WrapSharingViolations(WrapSharingViolationsCallback action)
    {
        WrapSharingViolations(action, null, 10, 100);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Wraps sharing violations that could occur on a file IO operation.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="action">The action to execute. May not be null.</param>
    /// <param name="exceptionsCallback">The exceptions callback. May be null.</param>
    /// <param name="retryCount">The retry count.</param>
    /// <param name="waitTime">The wait time in milliseconds.</param>
    public static void WrapSharingViolations(WrapSharingViolationsCallback action, WrapSharingViolationsExceptionsCallback exceptionsCallback, int retryCount, int waitTime)
    {
        if (action == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("action");

        for (int i = 0; i < retryCount; i++)
        {
            try
            {
                action();
                return;
            }
            catch (IOException ioe)
            {
                if ((IsSharingViolation(ioe)) && (i < (retryCount - 1)))
                {
                    bool wait = true;
                    if (exceptionsCallback != null)
                    {
                        wait = exceptionsCallback(ioe, i, retryCount, waitTime);
                    }
                    if (wait)
                    {
                        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(waitTime);
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    throw;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Defines a sharing violation wrapper delegate.
    /// </summary>
    public delegate void WrapSharingViolationsCallback();

    /// <summary>
    /// Defines a sharing violation wrapper delegate for handling exception.
    /// </summary>
    public delegate bool WrapSharingViolationsExceptionsCallback(IOException ioe, int retry, int retryCount, int waitTime);

    /// <summary>
    /// Determines whether the specified exception is a sharing violation exception.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="exception">The exception. May not be null.</param>
    /// <returns>
    ///     <c>true</c> if the specified exception is a sharing violation exception; otherwise, <c>false</c>.
    /// </returns>
    public static bool IsSharingViolation(IOException exception)
    {
        if (exception == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("exception");

        int hr = GetHResult(exception, 0);
        return (hr == -2147024864); // 0x80070020 ERROR_SHARING_VIOLATION

    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the HRESULT of the specified exception.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="exception">The exception to test. May not be null.</param>
    /// <param name="defaultValue">The default value in case of an error.</param>
    /// <returns>The HRESULT value.</returns>
    public static int GetHResult(IOException exception, int defaultValue)
    {
        if (exception == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("exception");

        try
        {
            const string name = "HResult";
            PropertyInfo pi = exception.GetType().GetProperty(name, BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance); // CLR2
            if (pi == null)
            {
                pi = exception.GetType().GetProperty(name, BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance); // CLR4
            }
            if (pi != null)
                return (int)pi.GetValue(exception, null);
        }
        catch
        {
        }
        return defaultValue;
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
They could really have provided a SharingViolationException. In fact, they still can, backwards-compatibly, as long as it descends from IOException. And they really, really should. –  romkyns May 23 '11 at 17:50
1  
Marshal.GetHRForException msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Steven T. Cramer Jul 3 '13 at 15:34

For this particular application directly observing the file will inevitably lead to a hard to trace bug, especially when the file size increases. Here are two different strategies that will work.

  • Ftp two files but only watch one. For example send the files important.txt and important.finish. Only watch for the finish file but process the txt.
  • FTP one file but rename it when done. For example send important.wait and have the sender rename it to important.txt when finished.

Good luck!

share|improve this answer

One of the techniques I used some time back was to write my own function. Basically catch the exception and retry using a timer which you can fire for a specified duration. If there is a better way, please share.

share|improve this answer

From MSDN:

The OnCreated event is raised as soon as a file is created. If a file is being copied or transferred into a watched directory, the OnCreated event will be raised immediately, followed by one or more OnChanged events.

Your FileSystemWatcher could be modified so that it doesn't do its read/rename during the "OnCreated" event, but rather:

  1. Spanws a thread that polls the file status until it is not locked (using a FileInfo object)
  2. Calls back into the service to process the file as soon as it determines the file is no longer locked and is ready to go
share|improve this answer
1  
Spawning the thread of the filesystemwatcher can lead the underlying buffer to overflow, thus missing a lot of changed files. A better approach will be to create a consumer/producer queue. –  Nissim Feb 23 '10 at 9:29

I don't know what you're using to determine the file's lock status, but something like this should do it.

while (true)
{
    try {
        stream = File.Open( fileName, fileMode );
        break;
    }
    catch( FileIOException ) {

        // check whether it's a lock problem

        Thread.Sleep( 100 );
    }
}
share|improve this answer

In most cases simple approach like @harpo suggested will work. You can develop more sophisticated code using this approach:

  • Find all opened handles for selected file using SystemHandleInformation\SystemProcessInformation
  • Subclass WaitHandle class to gain access to it's internal handle
  • Pass found handles wrapped in subclassed WaitHandle to WaitHandle.WaitAny method
share|improve this answer

Ad to transfer process trigger file SameNameASTrasferedFile.trg that is created after file transmission is completed.

Then setup FileSystemWatcher that will fire event only on *.trg file.

share|improve this answer

I do it the same way as Gulzar, just keep trying with a loop.

In fact I don't even bother with the file system watcher. Polling a network drive for new files once a minute is cheap.

share|improve this answer
    
It may be cheap but once a minute is too long for lots of applications. Real time monitoring is essential sometimes. Instead of you having to implement something that will be listening for Filesystem messages in C#(not the most convenient language for these things) you use FSW. –  ThunderGr Nov 7 '13 at 7:11

Simply use the Changed event with the NotifyFilter NotifyFilters.LastWrite:

var watcher = new FileSystemWatcher {
      Path = @"c:\temp\test",
      Filter = "*.xml",
      NotifyFilter = NotifyFilters.LastWrite
};
watcher.Changed += watcher_Changed; 
watcher.EnableRaisingEvents = true;
share|improve this answer
1  
FileSystemWatcher doesn't only notify when a file is done being written to. It will often notify you several times for a "single" logical write, and if you try to open the file after receiving the first notification you will get an exception. –  Ross May 1 '13 at 7:18

I ran into a similar issue when adding an outlook attachment. "Using" saved the day.

string fileName = MessagingBLL.BuildPropertyAttachmentFileName(currProp);

                //create a temporary file to send as the attachment
                string pathString = Path.Combine(Path.GetTempPath(), fileName);

                //dirty trick to make sure locks are released on the file.
                using (System.IO.File.Create(pathString)) { }

                mailItem.Subject = MessagingBLL.PropertyAttachmentSubject;
                mailItem.Attachments.Add(pathString, Outlook.OlAttachmentType.olByValue, Type.Missing, Type.Missing);
share|improve this answer

How about this as an option:

private void WaitOnFile(string fileName)
{
    FileInfo fileInfo = new FileInfo(fileName);
    for (long size = -1; size != fileInfo.Length; fileInfo.Refresh())
    {
        size = fileInfo.Length;
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000);
    }
}

Of course if the filesize is preallocated on the create you'd get a false positive.

share|improve this answer
1  
If the process writing to the file pauses for more than a second, or buffers in memory for more than a second, then you will get another false positive. I don't think this is a good solution under any circumstance. –  C. Lawrence Wenham Jul 23 '09 at 13:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.