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I was wondering which of the following would execute faster, just out of curiosity. The language is Java.

int num = -500;
int num2 = 0;

while( Math.abs(num) > num2 )
    num2 ++;

or

int num = -500;
int num2 = 0;
num = Math.abs(num);

while( num > num2 )
    num2 ++;

Essentially I am wondering whether 'Math.abs' is called for every iteration of the while loop, or is there some code optimization going on in the background?

Thanks!

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5  
Have you tried putting a timer around the code to see which one is faster? That's where I would start. In most cases these end up being premature optimization. –  CoolBeans Feb 22 '11 at 5:43
    
I can't see the first example being slower, but I'm curious if the compiler can detect that Math.abs is a pure function and optimize it out with some simple static analysis. –  ide Feb 22 '11 at 5:46
    
See stackoverflow.com/questions/771092/… –  paxdiablo Feb 22 '11 at 5:47
    
The 2nd loop is easier to optimize but both don't tell much what you try to do. The 1st one will be slower w/o any optimizations, the worse part is harder to predict branch prediction not the abs itself. –  bestsss Feb 22 '11 at 6:00
    
Second one is more friendly - for humans especially when debugging. –  Jayan Feb 22 '11 at 7:00

7 Answers 7

Yes, Math.abs(num) is called for each iteration, because Java can never tell or guess, that a return value only depends on the parameter.

For Java, the method is "equal" to Math.random().

So the first example uses more CPU time.

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In theory, the HotSpot JIT compiler could tell that the abs method call will always return the same thing, and "hoist" it out of the loop. Some optimizing compilers do that kind of thing ... though I don't know about HotSpot. –  Stephen C Feb 22 '11 at 6:47
    
@Stephen C , abs doesn't work for Integer.MIN_VALUE, so it's practically not optimizable. –  bestsss Feb 22 '11 at 6:59
    
@bestsss - why would that make any difference? The JIT compiler doesn't care whether a method returns the "right" answer according to the method's requirements. It just needs to ensure that the compiled code gives "right" answer according to the JVM spec of how the bytcodes should be executed. –  Stephen C Feb 22 '11 at 7:33
    
@Stephen C, the good thing of abs is that the result is >= (not for real), so the branch prediction is easy or it can be omitted. However it's not always >=0, so it can not be optimized away. JVM spec doesn't help the optimization part (it's just a spec.) There can be intrinsic but the fact the function returns negative result for some inputs doesn't help much. Unrelated: it's a pity hotspot doesn't help AtomicMarkableReference w/ address mask in the lower bits. –  bestsss Feb 22 '11 at 8:53
1  
@bestsss - we are not talking about optimizations of how abs is calculated. We are talking about the optimization where the evaluation of the abs(num) sub-expression gets moved out of the loop. –  Stephen C Feb 22 '11 at 9:42

Math.abs() is what is called a pure function, so a really good compiler could theoretically optimize it out. There are functional programming languages specifically designed to do just that, but in Java it would be difficult.

Not only is the second one likely to be compiled into faster code, it's generally accepted as better style, as it makes more clear what actually changes in the loop and what doesn't.

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3  
+1 - especially for noting the style issue. –  Stephen C Feb 22 '11 at 6:48
    
except abs doesn't work for Integer.MIN_VALUE (i.e.) abs(Integer.MIN_VALUE)==Integer.MIN_VALUE, people often forger that not numbers fit the boundaries. –  bestsss Feb 22 '11 at 7:00
    
@bestsss, true, but that doesn't keep the function from being pure. If the input is MIN_VALUE, the output is always the same. –  Karl Bielefeldt Feb 22 '11 at 7:10
    
yes but the most useful optimization for i.e >= doesn't hold true, so while it's still a pure one, it doesn't allow any easy optimization (unless the argument is a constant which is a trivial case) –  bestsss Feb 22 '11 at 7:20

Out of curiosity, I executed an unscientific benchmark that returned the following results:

For comparability:

  • Number of warmups ([1]): 1000
  • Number of iterations ([1]): 1500
  • Number of removed outliers ([1]): 300
  • Error bars showing an CI with 95% propability [1] for each solution and scale level

Host Information:

  • Java Version: 1.6.0_21
  • Java Vendor: Sun Microsystems Inc.
  • Java VM Arguments: -Xmx1024m; -Dfile.encoding=Cp1252
  • OS Architecture: amd64
  • OS Name: Windows 7
  • OS Version: 6.1
  • Available cores: 2
  • Free memory available to JVM (bytes): 122182232
  • Maximum memory (bytes): 954466304
  • Total memory in use (bytes): 124125184
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The second one has to do the absolute value function every pass of the while loop. Of course, this is only true if Java no longer optimizes to store the results of operations like this, and I believe this is the case. Java hasn't had that optimization for a while, it now relies on the JIT.

So to answer your question, the first one is faster.

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Wrong way around ... –  Stephen C Feb 22 '11 at 6:49
    
Oops, my bad. Well everything I said except flip when I said first and second. –  Ross Hays Feb 23 '11 at 23:01
class AbsTest {

   public static void main(String[] args) {
       int num = -2000000000;
       int num2 = 0;



       long then = System.currentTimeMillis();
       while( Math.abs(num) > num2 )
           num2 ++;

       long then2 = System.currentTimeMillis();
       num = Math.abs(num);
       num2 = 0;

       while( num > num2 )
           num2 ++;

       long now = System.currentTimeMillis();
       System.out.println(then2 - then); // first time
       System.out.println(now - then2); // second time

   }

}

result:

C:\Documents and Settings\glowcoder\My Documents>java AbsTest
2953
1828

C:\Documents and Settings\glowcoder\My Documents>
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1  
That's not a good microbenchmark. –  Joachim Sauer Feb 22 '11 at 5:56
    
not sounding arrogant but that's yet another "how not to write microbenchmarks". the 1st and the 2nd loop is dead code under any optimizations. –  bestsss Feb 22 '11 at 5:56

Hey Inventor i think it is worthless to have comparison between these two as it depends upon your compiler implementation. As

  1. if your compiler performs optimization then you find that most probably both code will take same running time.

  2. if it doesn't perform that then obviously the second one is faster.

So i think you should not be worry about these kind of things.

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Java Code

package test;

public class SpeedTest 
{
    public void first()
    {
        int num = -500;
        int num2 = 0;

        while( Math.abs(num) > num2 )
            num2 ++;
    }

    public void second()
    {
        int num = -500;
        int num2 = 0;
        num = Math.abs(num);

        while( num > num2 )
            num2 ++;
    }
}

Byte Code

Compiled from "SpeedTest.java"
public class test.SpeedTest extends java.lang.Object{
public test.SpeedTest();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #8; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   return

public void first();
  Code:
   0:   sipush  -500
   3:   istore_1
   4:   iconst_0
   5:   istore_2
   6:   goto    12
   9:   iinc    2, 1
   12:  iload_1
   13:  invokestatic    #15; //Method java/lang/Math.abs:(I)I
   16:  iload_2
   17:  if_icmpgt       9
   20:  return

public void second();
  Code:
   0:   sipush  -500
   3:   istore_1
   4:   iconst_0
   5:   istore_2
   6:   iload_1
   7:   invokestatic    #15; //Method java/lang/Math.abs:(I)I
   10:  istore_1
   11:  goto    17
   14:  iinc    2, 1
   17:  iload_1
   18:  iload_2
   19:  if_icmpgt       14
   22:  return
}

From the above both of them are essentially taking ~20 instruction. If you are very picky then the first one is fast.

The reason for difference is that you are calculating and storing the result in the second approach. Which you need to popup again while comparing. While in the first case you are directly comparing the register value just after the Math.abs. And hence two extra instruction.


Update

As pointed out by @ide and @bestsss:

The number of instructions in the bytecode doesn't really correlate with the number of times they're actually called. Plus there's HotSpot to spice things up further (like dead code optimization).

As in this example the Math.abs() is called upon a fixed value of -500. So it is possible for HotSpot JVM to optimize it.

See the below comments for more details.

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1  
The number of instructions in the bytecode doesn't really correlate with the number of times they're actually called. Plus there's HotSpot to spice things up further. –  ide Feb 22 '11 at 5:48
    
+1 for showing the bytecode. -1 for not pointing out that the first method is only fewer instructions if the loop doesn't iterate more than once. –  Karl Bielefeldt Feb 22 '11 at 6:00
    
byte code length doesn't tell much, dead code is optimized away when possible too. Byte code comparing is like comparing the color of the car and deciding the red one must be faster. –  bestsss Feb 22 '11 at 6:02
    
@ide & @bestsss: HotSpot optimization point just skipped from my mind. Updating my answer to reflect that :(. –  Favonius Feb 22 '11 at 6:24
    
@ Karl Bielefeldt: Thanks for pointing out. But since values are hardcoded and there is a loop so i left it out. –  Favonius Feb 22 '11 at 6:27

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