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My introductory tutorial has suddenly become very advanced. I have no idea how this program works. Can you explain in plain language?

At the end it prints (((1 * 3) + 5) * 3), but I don't get it at all. I understand that findSequence gets passed 24, that triggers function find. I'm assuming that function find gets passed 1,"1" with the latter being assigned to history?? but I don`t understand why the second 1 is in quotation marks "1!, nor do I understand the use of quotation marks when it returns find(start etc.

function findSequence(goal) {
  function find(start, history) {
    if (start == goal)
      return history;
    else if (start > goal)
      return null;
    else
      return find(start + 5, "(" + history + " + 5)") ||
             find(start * 3, "(" + history + " * 3)");
  }
  return find(1, "1");
}

print(findSequence(24));
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up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have an "output" string (((1 * 3) + 5) * 3), a goal 24 and a first character 1. The 1 is the 1 in 1 * 3. This program will assemble a string containing a math expression, adding (), *3 and +5 to try to obtain the goal. The two parameters of the find function are the current total and the expression that will generate the total. Clearly the expression is a string. The find compares the current total to the goal, and if it's equal then the expression is correct and it returns it, if the current total is > of the goal then he failed and return null. Otherwhise he add some operations to the expression. He tries two "ways", one multiplying * 3 the current result, the other adding +5 to the current result. It's recursive on a tree (so each time he will bifurcate in two recursive calls). null || something == something, so the branch that will find a response will return his response, the other branch will return null and the "winning" response will be passed back.

Let's say the goal is 11.

  • find(1, "1")
    1. compares 1 with 11 and calls: (2.) find(1 + 5, "(" + "1" + " + 5)") (so find(6, "(1 + 5)") and (3.) find(1 * 3, "(" + "1" + " * 3)") (so find(3, "(1 * 3)")
    2. compares 6 with 11 and calls (4.) find (6 + 5, "(" + "(1 + 5)" + " + 5)") (so finds(11, "((1 + 5) + 5)") and (5.) find (6 * 3, "(" + "(1 + 5)" + " * 3)" (so find(18, "((1 + 5) * 3)"
    3. compares 3 with 11 and calls (6.) find (3 + 5, "(" + "(1 * 3)" + " + 5)") (so finds(8, "((1 * 3) + 5)") and (7.) find (3 * 3, "(" + "(1 * 3)" + " * 3)" (so find(8, "((1 + 3) * 3)"
    4. compares 11 with 11. The numbers are equal. So he returns "((1 + 5) + 5)" (the history). 5, 6, 7 will at a certain point go "overboard" and surpass the 11, so they'll return null. null || null == null, "((1 + 5) + 5)" || null == "((1 + 5) + 5)", so the history will win against the nulls and it will be returned.

To make it even clearer, try these versions:

function findSequence(goal) {
  function find(start, history) {
    if (start == goal)
      return history;
    else if (start > goal)
      return null;
    else {
      var ret = find(start + 5, "(" + history + " + 5)");

      if (ret == null)
         ret = find(start * 3, "(" + history + " * 3)");

      return ret;
    }
  }

  return find(1, "1");
}

print(findSequence(24));

And this, where instead of an expression you'll get only as tring of + and *

function findSequence(goal) {
  function find(start, history) {
    if (start == goal)
      return history;
    else if (start > goal)
      return null;
    else {
      var ret = find(start + 5, history + "+");

      if (ret == null)
         ret = find(start * 3, history + "*");

      return ret;
     }
  }

  return find(1, "1");
}

print(findSequence(24));

And be aware that, as an example, it's quite complex because it used closures (locally defined functions).

share|improve this answer
    
I was looking for more of a step by step guide through the code. Your answer, although Im sure correct, doesnt unfortunately clarify anything for me :(( – mjmitche Feb 22 '11 at 6:42
    
thanks for trying, but your answer is still beyond me (Im a newbie doing what I thought was a beginners tutorial). start = current total? history =expression? in return find(1,"1") why is the latter in quotation marks? can you explain how all the strings and numbers and quotation marks interact in return find(start + 5, "(" + history + " + 5)") etc..thank you if you can help more. – mjmitche Feb 22 '11 at 6:53
1  
Let me comprehend... are you trying to study javascript as your first language?... Are you using a debugger, like firebug? put a breakpoint on the if (start == goal) and go line by line. It's the best way to learn. – xanatos Feb 22 '11 at 7:00
    
thank you. very complicated. I will study it. in the 2nd, 3rd and 4th step above, you write, for example, "compares 1 with 11 and calls: (2)" and then "compares 6 with 11 and calls (4)" and then "...calls (6). Why do these calls keep jumping by 2? – mjmitche Feb 22 '11 at 7:04
    
Because the editor hates me :-) Each find can spawn 0 or two find. So the find at 1. will call the find at 2 and 3. The one at 2 will call the find at 4 and 5. It's a tree-like structure. At some point one find doesn't call the other finds and begins to "roll-back" – xanatos Feb 22 '11 at 7:09

Try this tutorial out

http://nicksjavascript.blogspot.com

its made for beginners

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